#DILO – (A day in the life of) a master’s student

The vast majority (if not all) of our students are working and leading remarkably busy professional lives. Some are motivated and have already decided to undertake a master’s, while others contemplate the unknowns of an online programme. In my experience, two things affect their decision the most.  

First – finances, and second, being able to strike the perfect work, study, and life balance. While I cannot completely help you with the finances (partially yes – check out the discount offers currently being offered on our online MBA, MSc, and LL.M programmes), I thought what I could do to help was to bring some facts to light about the other unknowns – what does a typical day in the life of an online master’s student look like? 

I asked a few of our students from different walks of life, occupations, and personal situations to answer a few questions on their study tactics and strategies, plans and reality, and so on. I thank each one of the respondents for taking the time to share their experiences and give valuable advice to you – possibly future students. In our ‘a typical day in the life of a master’s student’ blog series, we bring to you one of our real students or alumni sharing the insights.  

Today, we’re looking at one of our students journey, a busy professional being a CEO of an International NGO, who got only busier during and after Covid.  

An Introduction 

Which programme did you choose and why? 

MBA Leading Innovation and Change, because the “Aid industry” needs to innovate and change and I needed to learn so I could play a small part in that.

The Study Plan  

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week? 

Given my intense work schedule I chose to do the program over two years committing to 25 hours per week of study during the time actively enrolled in a module plus pre-reading between modules. It all went well for the first module and then I had to take a few years off due to a serious medical situation.

Since restarting It will took me two years to complete the remaining 3 modules and the dissertation. Time commitment on modules 25 hours per week average was close, albeit closer to 40 hours a week closer to deadlines.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?) 

Well, for me it was evenings and weekend, sometimes late evenings as late as 3am. I eventually understood that the studies cannot be done effectively in an hour or two at a time. It definitely needed longer periods of intense study.

How much time did you devote for each assignment? 

I took the 300 hours recommended very seriously in my planning (25 jours per week per module) In the end, I probably averaged 350-400 per module. There is so much reading to do and lots of great rabbit holes 🙂

Travelling and Communication 

Did you travel for work? How did travelling impact your ability to study? 

Immensely! My job involves me being all over the world 6 months out of 12 and this heavily impacted one module. I planned the best I could, but it was a huge challenge and in the end I had to get board permission to back off on some work commitments to ensure I succeed in my studies. Fortunately, my board is very understanding, I don’t think everyone would have that privilege. In the end, Covid slowed travel, but at the same time increased my workload very heavily.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences? 

I was so disappointed with the switch to an on-line residency because of Covid. Other than that, online interaction was fine and time differences were not a major issue for me.

A typical day as a master’s student 

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you? 

There was no typical day for me, intense travel schedules and work responsibilities made that extremely difficult. Some weeks I could not get more than a few hours and in other weeks I studied 60 to 70 hours.

Any advice? 

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies. 

Do not undertake this lightly. Be realistic in your planning, consider your work loads and travel schedules and make sure you build a realistic study plan around them. It takes huge discipline, you have to make it a priority and in doing so consider your family situation too. I am thankful that my wife understands how important this is to me and continues to support me throughout.

All right folks, this was a sneak peek of a typical day as a master’s student. I hope you find it insightful and informative and that it gives you an idea of what to expect when you enrol for our master’s programmes. Watch this space as we have many more interesting insights coming up! 

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student at RKC – Vernon W

Here’s presenting another gem of our #dilo -a day in the life of RKC student series. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions and give feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning.

There is no better way to learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student! Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am an entrepreneur in charge of a couple of SMEs in the Caribbean. I had to delay embarking on the ‘MBA journey’ as for many years I would work up to 16 hours/day. But alas, MBA was always one of by 2020 ‘Things to do’ so I embarked on the journey mainly because of this reason. A plan must be executed.

Which programme did you choose and why?

MBA Leadership & Sustainability.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

Prior to MBA, I read widely on many subject areas, so that helped me while studying. Unfortunately, notwithstanding all my good plans at the beginning of each module, most times I would get started late. In reality, I must run two companies first – then study. I try to put in 3 hours, 3 times per week. Sometimes I get in as much as a full day – usually because I was behind and had to catch up.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

I study better at quiet times such as evenings and weekends would work best for me. This means I have to spend a lot of time planning ahead to reduce competing personal and business priorities. Most of the time when I settle down to study, I made sure I have little or no distractions.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?  

Usually, I use less than the recommended time. If the recommended time for preparation is say, 2 weeks, I have to get it done in half the time. This means reading all the recommended material and external material. As I said, I really try to read widely.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Travelling and Communication  

How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

Little or none at all. Prior to MBA I advised my associates that I did not wish to travel much until MBA is completed and so far so good. I do not do a lot of local travelling.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

For my business, I use a suitable app communicate with multiple people in different time zones. I simply added Zurich to the list. Not much trouble there and the time stamp on the study portal helps.

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

A full day of work and then some studies. Some days I get in up to say 1 hour during the work day (his happens say once or twice weekly). During this time, I participate in the learning forum. The forum is a healthy place to learn other perspectives so I go back to read other students’ posts whenever I miss them. These are very important – similar to being in a physical class room.

At the end of the day, I try to put in more time before heading home, and if unsuccessful, try to make up before heading off to sleep.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

Yes. I do not think I am a poster student for giving advice to students on this topic as I am working daily to improve my own scheduling. I think my present mode is at about 70% and based on grades thus far it is clear to me that all I have to do is get some more time in. Students (and myself) could:

1. Schedule time away from work as is required. In the end, an MBA is an investment and ‘time’ is money.

2. If possible, have discourse (outside of the forum) with someone on the subject area – including via video conferencing. Great if its another student. This is also good for long-term collaboration and networking.

3. If you were pursuing MBA in a physical lecture setting, travel time, traffic and other factors would have ensured more time is spend pursuing MBA – even if some are wasted on transportation. So, while studying online result in less CO2, be careful it does not necessarily also result in less time studying.

Enjoy the benefits of this mode of study, but remember, its an investment of time and money and the returns can make a big difference in your life (and your family’s).

I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and answers to any questions you may have.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Andy Wertheim

This series has fast become one of our most appreciated blog posts. This “day in the life of” series focuses on the challenges and rewards our students derive from doing an online master’s degree with us, and we have been blessed with students who were more than happy to volunteer their time and share their experiences.

There is no better way to learn than from those who came before and see if what worked for them will work for you. It will help you become a better student and, hopefully, help you make an informed decision.

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am Andy Wertheim, a Robert Kennedy College and University of Cumbria MBA student.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I planned to allocate a certain number of hours per week on fixed evenings and the occasional weekend, but it didn’t work out that way. I’m definitely a “deadlines” person, so the regular modular structure of the course helped keep things ticking along nicely, with draft essays and other assignments keeping me focused on making good progress. It became more of a challenge with the dissertation as there was a) a hiatus after finishing the last essay and then being allowed to start the dissertation, so I completely lost momentum, and, b) there were no intermediate milestones/deadlines to keep me ticking along. As a result, I had to be much more disciplined and ended up taking blocks of time off work to complete the dissertation. I clearly needed to get up a head of steam and tackle sections in a block rather than do a little often with stop-start not working for me.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

As mentioned above, longer blocks of time suited me best rather than a particular time of day. That said because I was also doing a full-time job and other activities, I was mostly restricted to evenings and weekends.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

Unknown, sorry – I didn’t keep a log.

Travelling and Communication

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

Work travel tends to be occasional long-haul flights for me, which helped as I could download relevant reading and could then take notes, etc., on the flight. Most of my study time, however, was spent at home.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors, given the time differences?

The forums were okay, but this is the biggest issue with remote courses, in my experience. You simply don’t get the same level of interaction, shared learning and general camaraderie / shared experience as you do with face-to-face learning. This was particularly noticeable with the excellent week-long sustainability residential in Cumbria, especially when juxtaposed against the comparative isolation (even loneliness) of the dissertation. The benefits of remote learning definitely outweigh the restrictions, however.

My advice

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

Lots of evening reading during the modules, completing the interim assignments and then a bigger burst of effort in 2-3 day blocks for the final assessment submissions. The dissertation was a whole new ball game with longer blocks of time needed to really focus on getting the job done.

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

I can only suggest people find their own rhythm – if you’re very disciplined, then a little often may work for you, but I’m not like that, so had to adapt to fit my own way of working within the wider context of work and MBA deadlines.


We at Robert Kennedy College are here to support you through the entire process and encourage you to get in touch with our team of Education Advisors and chat with them Live on WhatsApp if you have any questions about our programmes, fee structure, the application process, or details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

If you have already made up your mind and are ready to apply, then just click here.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Naomi Osei-Asemani

Continuing with our popular blog series that answers some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get asked frequently by students looking to join one of our online programmes, we asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

Let’s learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student!

An Introduction

Photo credit: canva.com

Who are you, really?

My name is Naomi Osei-Asemani. Professionally I work as an educationist. I am a CEO of an international school in Ghana, West Africa (Peculiar International School). I have 140 staff working under me. Personally, I love kids and anything that has to do with them, especially their upbringing and education. My school has 1,400 students ranging from ages 1-19. I am very passionate about this job; thus, I sacrifice all my life and finances for it. I also love taking care of the youth and directing them, so they don’t derail from their missions in life. I, therefore, have about five (5) students I am taking care of/sponsoring at various universities in my country Ghana. I have also given scholarships to more than twenty (20) children to attend school (basic school), some of whom I feed as well. I also like taking care of old people, and in that area, I have four elderly people (two are 85 years old) I feed and ensure their safety.

Getting back into education

Photo credit: canva.com

Your story of getting back to do a Master’s degree

What was the driving force behind your enrolling for an online degree? Who inspired you? What motivated you?

In the first place, it has been my desire for a long time to become a PhD holder one day in my life. Secondly, the industry I am in is challenging; the mode of delivering education worldwide keeps changing, and therefore, I needed and still need to upgrade myself to meet global challenges. Finally, my school runs the Cambridge IGCSE and A Level, and there is, therefore, the need to recruit staff with high qualifications and those qualified to deliver the curriculum. I, therefore, need to highly educate myself so that I don’t fall short of the knowledge and skill required to direct the affairs of the staff. Self-motivation is a global challenge that comes with human resources.

What were the thoughts/situations/people/challenges holding you back from starting (if any)? How did you overcome them?

Family issues. How will I manage schooling with my tasking job? HOW DID I OVERCOME IT? I resorted to doing all my studies at night when all the family members and my staff had retired to their beds. I did this continuously for two years.

What surprised you the most when you started your studies?

I realized that I could work and attain a master’s degree using only the night to study. I thought I could do that because I worked so hard during the day and cared for my family after work. But I could pull through even though it was a bit tough.

Do you feel there are unique challenges women face when deciding to get back into education?

Yes, women face issues with their husbands, childcare and the fact that society generally doesn’t expect higher education from women. My friends think a bachelor’s degree should be enough since I own a business. To the society around me: “what else are you looking for in life”? Also, challenges with workplace issues, especially when women are working for other employers. The challenges are lack of funds to sponsor oneself to school, tight work schedules, and traffic to get back home.

Getting the degree

Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

The work to get the degree – what did you learn, how did you balance, what would you do differently

Which programme did you do? Why?

I did MA in Leading Innovation and Change (MALIC) – This programme has been discontinued, and has reincarnated as a 100% online MBA programme in Leading Innovation and Change. I chose this course because,

  1. I needed to learn more about leadership because I needed to become a better leader than I was.
  2. I was attracted to the innovation part because of the changing trends in education delivery and changes in technology.
  3. Climate change is happening all around us.

I thought this course would help me acquire the requisite knowledge to combat these issues.

What is the single most important thing you learned during the programme?

One most important thing I learnt is that, culture is like an iceberg; what we see happening in the organization is just the tip of the iceberg. The bigger part of organizational culture is very much embedded in the attitudes and behaviours of people, and changing the culture is not as easy as we think.

Michael Watkins sees Culture as a form of protection that has evolved from situational pressures. With this, we know that culture evolves, so as the people grow in the organization, the culture also grows with them. I have therefore been deliberate with the kind of culture my organization is building because I have become aware of how difficult it is to change the culture we build.

How did you balance work and studies?

I work during the day and study during the night.

Any particular challenges to being a woman and studying online, or do you think all students face the same ones?

The challenge of having to balance my responsibilities as a wife, a mother, a career woman, a CEO and a philanthropist (well, I think some other women also go through the same). Also, I did not have any physical classmates to even talk to when I faced any challenge: this aspect was very challenging.

Life post degree

What changed, if anything?

What’s new in your life since graduating / starting your studies? Any visible impact already?

Having finished my studies, I have acquired new knowledge, skills and abilities to change what is not working in my workplace. To bring new innovations and deliberately introduce organizational activities that I know can become deeply embedded in our culture.

Anything you are doing differently now because of the things you learned?

I have introduced online studies for my students and parents, which has helped during the Covid-19 crisis. I have also been able to open another school which is totally different from the schools operating in the area, and even from the current one I am operating, it is an innovation. This school will open in three months’ time. It is a combination of the Montessori and Froebel systems of education. The packaging and delivery methods are different. I am also rolling out a new system where parents can call teachers to come to their homes to help their children.

Do you feel that getting a Master’s degree or doing other online programmes can reduce gender discrimination in the workplace?

Of course, yes. Having a Master’s degree has made me bolder and more knowledgeable. My appetite for research has also increased.

Advice for other women

Photo credit: canva.com

Or other students, really.

Imagine you could send a message back in time to your pre-degree self: what would it be?

Eiiii!! Naomi, everything is possible. Don’t think of your tight schedule in your office, the needs of your staff or the number of students under you. Don’t even think your husband or your three children would be hindrances. Remember, Naomi, that with God on your side and with determination and hard work, you can make it. Also, know that you can do everything through Christ who strengthens you, so go all out and venture into any area in life you want to.

Imagine you could send an object back in time to your pre-degree self: what would it be?

A picture to motivate me.

Closing thoughts

Anything else you would like to add that could help with the goal of increasing women’s participation/access to a Master’s degree?

I want all women to know that there is nothing impossible if you are determined to do it. In the face of all the challenges we see, we can still do whatever we want to do, be whatever we want to be and get wherever we want to get. Step out to take your Master’s degree, do the RKC online degree from your home, and remember to work more during the night when everyone is asleep. Listen, the sky is no longer the limit; the moon has now won the challenge. So aspire to be better. God bless you.


If you have been thinking about getting your master’s degree, and proving to yourself and others that you CAN do it, now would be a good time to take the plunge. Have a look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything that could help.

I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for more similar blogs. You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and the discounts we might offer.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a RKC’s master’s student

As a former Education advisor, if I had to pick one of the most frequently asked questions by prospective students, it would be “How many hours do I need to study?”  

The vast majority (if not all) of our students are working and leading hectic professional lives. Some are motivated and have already decided to undertake a master’s, while others contemplate the unknowns of an online programme. In my experience, two things affect their decision the most.   

First – finances, and second, being able to strike the perfect work, study, and life balance. While I cannot completely help you with the finances (partially yes – check out the discount offers currently being offered on our online MBA, MSc, and LL.M programmes), I thought what I could do to help was to bring some facts to light about the other unknowns – what does a typical day in the life of an online master’s student look like?  

Today, we’re looking at overview of one of RKC’s student typical day who is taking MBA Learsership and Management, offered in exclusive partnership with York St. John University.

An Introduction  

Which programme did you choose and why?  

I am studying MBA Leadership and Management. I chose it because I am a finance professional but work with the Operations unit which oversees the running of the office. And leadership and Management skills are required be able to manage people.

The Study Plan   

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?  

The course is conducted online. I mostly study on weekends and sometimes week days in the office when everyone has left. I usually listen to lectures and make my own notes from them. In total, I put in more than 10 hours a week, as I also have to do research and listen to the videos over and over, alongwith reading relevant text books.

 What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

On weekends I would study early mornings and also late evenings. On weekdays, I preferred studying late evenings after work in the office when everyone would leave. I usually stay back for at least 2 hours.

In total, I put in more than 10 hours a week

How much time did you devote for each assignment?  

Quite some time you need to do proper research and also understand your subject matter for you to be able to get a pass mark. So I had to drop out some social commitments and devote more time to my studies.

Travelling and Communication  

Did you travel for work? How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

I am studying online so travelling did not impact me.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

There was a module that required a group interaction and my fellow students lived in two different time zones. But we were able to agree on a time that we could meet. Time differences did not affect my interaction with my professors as they always responded to me in time and they could be reached whenever need be.

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

A typical day for me starts early at about 5:30am on weekends with me going to our OnlineCampus listening to videos and reading the online materials. On week days it also starts at 5:30am and getting ready for work. I usually work till 6:00pm and after I finish, would study for 2 hours, sometimes more in the office.

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

The best advice I can give to students is

1. Find a time in the day for up to 2 hours that you can concentrate on just your studies

2. Reduce social activities especially if you are working and studying at the same time

3. Try to ask a lot of questions to your professor if you don’t understand the instructions given for an assignment. I had to retake a module because I misunderstood the instruction.

4. Find a fellow student within the course you are doing, with who you can discuss few topics for better understanding.

5. Learn to submit assignment 2-3 days before the deadline. You might get unexpected internet challenge uploading your assignment at the last minute and miss the deadline by few minutes which will make you get a capped mark.

 

Guochang used reading tools, as Acrobat for reading, Zotero for note…

All right, so this was a sneak peek of a typical day in  life as a master’s student. I hope you find it insightful and informative and that it gives you an idea of what to expect when you enrol for our master’s programmes. Watch this space as we have many more interesting insights always! 

#DILO (A day in the life of) a Robert Kennedy College master’s student

Here’s another gem of our #dilo (a day in the life of) series featuring our students. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions and give feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning.

Learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student! Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am an ambitious 40 (soon to be 41) year old woman, juggling a very demanding job while trying to maintain a healthy lifestyle and continually developing myself on a professional level.

Which programme did you choose and why?

MBA Coaching, Mentoring and Leadership. I manage the HR function of a law firm, and I thought this programme would give me added skills which I can use in my current role.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I tried to watch all the videos and do as much reading as I possibly could during the first three weeks. I always aimed to start writing by week 4. A great piece of advice I got was, “Just start by writing sentences. The more you read, the more you’ll be able to articulate your ideas”. I found the advice to be very true and a good strategy. I would say I dedicated an average of 20 hours a week approximately.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

I would stay a couple of extra hours in the evening at work and dedicate that time to my studies. I found that to be easier than coming home and starting again. On the weekends, I would typically dedicate mornings to studying.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?  

I honestly cannot quantify that. One particular assignment required a lot more time than others, as it required a lot of practice. So I would say that I dedicated as much time as I could depending on the requirements for each module.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Travelling and Communication  

How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

My work does not require me to travel, so it was a matter of ensuring that any holidays would be planned in a way that they would not interfere with my studies.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

The online platform makes this pretty easy. Professors are usually quick in replying. I think the residency in York was an essential part of this programme because it made the whole experience real. You realise that most people are struggling with the same issues as you, and keeping in contact with several peers (mainly via Whatsapp) has provided a great support network, especially during dissertation!

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

Go out for a run first thing in the morning before getting ready for work (currently back in the office 3 days a week). Deal with everything the day throws at me. At the end of the working day, I either spend an extra couple of hours at the office to dedicate to my studies or go home. I would summarise it as busy; however, now that I am in the final stages of this programme, I can honestly say that I would do it all over again. Looking back, I can say that the past two years have gone by very quickly, and all the effort was well worth it.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

Always give yourself sufficient time to write your assignments, and don’t leave them until the last minute. Read, read and read, as that is the only way you’ll be able to write. If you have a block on some days, that’s fine, pick up the next day, and if you don’t know what to write, it means you haven’t read enough.


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been considering doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and answers to any questions you may have.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Patrick Kyamanywa

Have you been asking yourself – What is the best way to study online? Should you do an online programme? How to better manage time when learning online?

Photo by Emily Morter on Unsplash.

These are all questions that we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get regularly asked by students looking to join one of our online programmes. Undertaking to do an online master’s degree programme will be an additional commitment to your time and finances, and it is wise to get information beforehand.

Through this continuing series of blog posts, some of our past and current students have shared their experiences, thoughts and opinions and given their feedback on handling some of these choices and situations. This series has fast become one of our most appreciated blog posts. This “day in the life of” series focuses on the challenges and rewards our students derive from doing an online master’s degree with us, and we have been blessed with students who were more than happy to volunteer their time and share their experiences.

Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision!

An Introduction

Photo by Rock Staar on Unsplash.

Who are you?

I am Patrick Kyamanywa, a professor of surgery and medical educator heading a health sciences university campus of Kampala International University. I am an active researcher in the fields of human resources for health and injury epidemiology, and socially I am a family man with a large extended family under my care.

Which programme did you choose and why?

I chose the MBALIC. Having been in educational leadership for over 10 years, I found that many higher educational institutions were lagging behind just because of poor leadership. In addition, I was seeking to position myself for even higher leadership opportunities. Therefore, I found it necessary to find and pursue formal leadership training to cement my competencies.

The Study Plan

Plan how you are going to study. Photo by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

Taking on a demanding program while still serving as a full-time head of an educational institution was a brave move I had to make, although it was not the first time I was doing so. I enrolled for and successfully completed a PCAP at York St. John in 2009, and with this experience, I believed it would still be possible. What has always worked for me is starting my day early when the rest of the world still sleeps. So, for this MBALIC program, I set aside three hours every morning (4am to 7am) and occasionally added an hour or two after work (8pm to 10pm), depending on how the day had treated me. Discipline and consistency paid off, and I am happy that I achieved distinction grades in 3 of the 4 taught modules.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

As mentioned above, I am most efficient in the early mornings, and this enables me to produce a piece of work in half the time I would take if I did the same task during working hours.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

I always started the assignments early in the module. This allowed me to identify and archive relevant resources early enough, and after the first assignment, I had a template to work with. I knew what the expectations of the program were in terms of depth of literature review, quality of critical analysis and arguments required. With this, I was able, at some point, to have two overlapping modules.

Travelling and Communication

Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash.

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

Travelling often allowed me more private time. Being away from family and office demands afforded me extra hours during the day, depending on the mission demands, and so I was able to read and write more.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors, given the time differences?

The 24/7 forums and the ability to email colleagues and professors personally made it possible to keep in touch on all manner of issues.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online master’s student look like for you?

A typical day would start at 4am with 3 hours dedicated to study. I would usually go through the typical working day and then try to find another 2 hours at the end of the day. I tried to fit all office work within the 8am to 6pm working day. I also endeavoured to keep up with my 30 minutes to 45 minutes workout sessions at least three days a week. The workout sessions helped relieve the stress.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies?

My honest advice is to carve out protected study time that one can reliably and consistently devote to the program. The second is the need to start early and dig deep with every module and assignment and to ensure that one collaborates with peers and regularly engages in forum discussions.


We at Robert Kennedy College are here to support you through the entire process and encourage you to get in touch with our team of Education Advisors and chat with them Live on WhatsApp if you have any questions about our programmes, fee structure, the application process, or details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

If you have already made up your mind and are ready to apply, then just click here.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a RKC’s master’s student – Tomislava

Through the #DILO series of blog posts, we have been bringing you insights into the life of our master’s students, sharing their thoughts and opinions, ups and downs, and key learning points during their online studies. The whole idea behind this series is to make you aware of the realities of online studies and aid you in decision making.   

This week we take a look  at a day in the life of one of our master’s degree student, Tomislava. Here are a few insights and some words of wisdom that Tomislava has to share from her own experience:  

There is no better way to learn than from those who came before and see if what worked for them. It will help you become a better student and, hopefully, help you make an informed decision.

Tomislava is a mother of 3 kids and works as an assistant in emergency team at WHO

An Introduction

Who are you?

My name is Tomislava B and I am a mother of 3 kids, 8, 15 and 17. I work at WHO and as a assistant in emergency team who today are fighting the Covid-19 by supplying to the countries in need several essential items like Oxygen, masks, etc. and sending off different vaccines, medicine to be used in solidarity trials in testing and, so much more.

Which programme did you choose and why?

University of Cumbria’s MBA International Healthcare Management programme. I have been offered a job in WHO and I thought it would be good to learn on the subject.

The Study Plan

Photo by Jessica Lewis on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I worked in the evenings. I would block minimum 3 hours, reading a lot and getting all information by searching on the subject that I was studying. I did not have any experience, so it was all very new to me . I read every message and comments by students. That helped me a lot. Also asking a lot of questions.😀.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

I used to study in the evenings during the week and part of the day in the weekend. But mainly evenings for there were no distractions at that time of the day..

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

Once I would start a topic, I worked on it from the first day without leaving it in the middle. The time was precious, and working and studying at the same time was a great challenge. I also used my lunch time at work for looking what was taught and took few notes. I would do brainstorming by marking on the paper anything that will be useful for my writing.

Travelling and Communication

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

If travelling, I used to take all with me. All my books were online and when I was not travelling, I used my electronics notes. For anything that would come in my thoughts, I would pen it down.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

Evening time worked the best for me. We also formed a WhatsApp group and we could discuss any questions there. Also it was nice to hear different experiences and feedback.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online master’s student look like for you?

Getting up for the day, with books all over the place.😀. But, not a mess, as I arranged piles of books by unit and by subject in a very organised manner. I made a pile with different notes by period as to were I was in the writing. It was like building up something slowly but surely the final work was visible. Or like a song strophes by strophes 🎶 .

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Yes! One has to be very organised and never put anything down for tomorrow. Imagine you are making a wall and you have given yourself a goal to do let’s say half a meter. And you are ready but some other staff comes with more interesting things to do like to go out for a drink with a friend. And you say ok I will do it tomorrow. Tomorrow comes and what is going on? You have not started! You have to do everything that you were going to do yesterday and all that has been added today. You will find it very hard and will not be able to manage the way you would have done, if you had done a little part from yesterday and the part for today. It will demotivate you and tomorrow you will doubt etc.

So stay on track and do little by little but every day . Read everything and comments given by professor and by classmates is something not to be ignored! You will see that any question you have, you will find an answer in the precious discussions.


We at Robert Kennedy College are here to support you through the entire process and encourage you to get in touch with our team of Education Advisors and chat with them Live on WhatsApp if you have any questions about our programmes, fee structure, the application process, or details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

If you have already made up your mind and are ready to apply, then just click here.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Peter Spratling

This series has fast become one of our most appreciated blog posts. This “day in the life of” series focuses on the challenges and rewards our students derive from doing an online master’s degree with us, and we have been blessed with students who were more than happy to volunteer their time and share their experiences.

There is no better way to learn than from those who came before and see if what worked for them. It will help you become a better student and, hopefully, help you make an informed decision.

An Introduction

Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash.

Who are you?

I am Peter Spratling, a Robert Kennedy College (RKC) and University of Salford (UoS) MSc student.

Which programme did you choose and why?

MSc in Human Resource Management and Development alumni to support me in a Head of (International) School position.

The Study Plan

Photo by Jessica Lewis on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I planned to have time during my last year of headship at my last international school as things were established and running well. Then COVID-19 happened! I can’t count the hours, and there are many late nights as I have a 5-year-old daughter, and she’s important too 🙂

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

Late nights as I have a 5-year-old daughter, and she’s important too 🙂 Weekends too. I feel guilty sometimes escaping from swimming etc.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

It’s really hard to answer this, but every night reading material, discounting some, using other sources, moving from using books to recent, or more recent Google Scholar articles (thanks to Dr. H :))

Travelling and Communication

Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash.

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

I have not travelled, except for personal reasons, to the UK to see my parents.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

Easily using the UoS/RKC blogs and forums. The professors have been absolutely great. Supportive, understanding, and appropriately challenging at times 🙂 That includes Dr. Costa as Principal.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online master’s student look like for you?

Long but enjoyable and rewarding. Starts at 06:00 am and ends at midnight. That’s partly due to my role as a dad and headteacher.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Yes. The tutors, the professors, doctors, and librarians are all there to help us. They are approachable, as I found at times of stress, particularly during COVID-19, they made all the difference. Use Google Scholar or similar, Dr. Susan Harwood does a great workshop on this. Start early and get involved with the forums, they will help you in your essay writing.


We at Robert Kennedy College are here to support you through the entire process and encourage you to get in touch with our team of Education Advisors and chat with them Live on WhatsApp if you have any questions about our programmes, fee structure, the application process, or details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

If you have already made up your mind and are ready to apply, then just click here.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Khuong Ho Thi Uyen

Continuing with our popular blog series that answers some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get asked frequently by students looking to join one of our online programmes, we asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

Let’s learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student!

An Introduction

Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash.

Who are you?

My name is Khuong Ho Thi Uyen, a Robert Kennedy College and University of Cumbria MBA student.

Which programme did you choose and why?

I am working in the healthcare industry – medical devices as a leader. Therefore, specialized knowledge is needed. That was why I chose the International Healthcare Management course.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

Before the module, I just planned to dedicate the two days of the weekend so that I could save four days per month for learning. However, the reality was messy! My classmates were active in the class forum discussion right after the professor posted the learning theory for each objective and the critical discussion areas. Many responses and comments from classmates were posted every day, including the individual analysis of the learning theory plus sharing their work experiences, all creating a proactive class forum. Therefore, I had to change my plan and re-arrange my life and include every night after work and any free time, if possible, to keep up with the class momentum.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

Early mornings, in the evenings after work, and at weekends.

Make sure you are ready with a schedule to maximise your study time. Photo by Aron Visuals on Unsplash.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

Usually, at the beginning of each new module, I read through the overall module components, obtained an outlook on how many units per module and, which topic per unit, what was the assignment requirement to think about during the module time. Looking for an assignment topic was important and required more time consumed. Coming to the module’s assignment, I devoted at least a month to completing it.

Travelling and Communication

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

In fact, travelling had a positive impact on my studies. I utilized the waiting time at the airport and the flight time while in the aeroplane to read books, paper, and cases and think about that. Travel helped me refresh my knowledge and gave me the time to consider the subject from different angles, which enabled me to come up with more new ideas and deeply understand the discussion objective.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

It did not matter if we were in a different time zone from each other. We were able to connect directly in the class discussion forums. There was a window for you to leave any message you would like to ask the professor; you were also able to recognize who was online at the same time you were online so that you could connect them via module forum or by email easily as each classmate and professor also had an email which was told to us. Thanks to technology, I experienced that my classmates were prompt in their responses despite being in different time zones. Besides, at the beginning of each module, there was an introduction session, and via that, we set up another class group chat like on WhatsApp.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online master’s student look like for you?

It becomes a routine and feels normal to me!

Any advice?

Photo by Medienstürmer on Unsplash.

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

  1. Order recommended books for each module: Whether you plan to purchase a hardcopy or soft copy book, you should well plan this. Make sure you have the book ready with you before the module’s starting time so that you can refer to the books. This will facilitate your learning.
  2. Prepare your finances to pay for school fees on time and to purchase online books (if required).
  3. Time dedicated to the study is significant. You should plan it in advance and follow it strictly. With a scheduled study plan, you will know what to expect.
  4. All of your classmate’s comments and discussions in each module forum will add value to your learnings.
  5. Please do not hesitate to ask or comment or share. The more you ask, comment, and share, the more you are valued by the professor and your classmates.
  6. Read more: including recommended books, papers, and discussions. These are valuable sources for your study. 

Thank you, and enjoy your learning!


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.