#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Peter Spratling

This series has fast become one of our most appreciated blog posts. This “day in the life of” series focuses on the challenges and rewards our students derive from doing an online master’s degree with us, and we have been blessed with students who were more than happy to volunteer their time and share their experiences.

There is no better way to learn than from those who came before and see if what worked for them. It will help you become a better student and, hopefully, help you make an informed decision.

An Introduction

Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash.

Who are you?

I am Peter Spratling, a Robert Kennedy College (RKC) and University of Salford (UoS) MSc student.

Which programme did you choose and why?

MSc in Human Resource Management and Development alumni to support me in a Head of (International) School position.

The Study Plan

Photo by Jessica Lewis on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I planned to have time during my last year of headship at my last international school as things were established and running well. Then COVID-19 happened! I can’t count the hours, and there are many late nights as I have a 5-year-old daughter, and she’s important too 🙂

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

Late nights as I have a 5-year-old daughter, and she’s important too 🙂 Weekends too. I feel guilty sometimes escaping from swimming etc.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

It’s really hard to answer this, but every night reading material, discounting some, using other sources, moving from using books to recent, or more recent Google Scholar articles (thanks to Dr. H :))

Travelling and Communication

Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash.

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

I have not travelled, except for personal reasons, to the UK to see my parents.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

Easily using the UoS/RKC blogs and forums. The professors have been absolutely great. Supportive, understanding, and appropriately challenging at times 🙂 That includes Dr. Costa as Principal.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online master’s student look like for you?

Long but enjoyable and rewarding. Starts at 06:00 am and ends at midnight. That’s partly due to my role as a dad and headteacher.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Yes. The tutors, the professors, doctors, and librarians are all there to help us. They are approachable, as I found at times of stress, particularly during COVID-19, they made all the difference. Use Google Scholar or similar, Dr. Susan Harwood does a great workshop on this. Start early and get involved with the forums, they will help you in your essay writing.


We at Robert Kennedy College are here to support you through the entire process and encourage you to get in touch with our team of Education Advisors and chat with them Live on WhatsApp if you have any questions about our programmes, fee structure, the application process, or details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

If you have already made up your mind and are ready to apply, then just click here.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Khuong Ho Thi Uyen

Continuing with our popular blog series that answers some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get asked frequently by students looking to join one of our online programmes, we asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

Let’s learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student!

An Introduction

Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash.

Who are you?

My name is Khuong Ho Thi Uyen, a Robert Kennedy College and University of Cumbria MBA student.

Which programme did you choose and why?

I am working in the healthcare industry – medical devices as a leader. Therefore, specialized knowledge is needed. That was why I chose the International Healthcare Management course.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

Before the module, I just planned to dedicate the two days of the weekend so that I could save four days per month for learning. However, the reality was messy! My classmates were active in the class forum discussion right after the professor posted the learning theory for each objective and the critical discussion areas. Many responses and comments from classmates were posted every day, including the individual analysis of the learning theory plus sharing their work experiences, all creating a proactive class forum. Therefore, I had to change my plan and re-arrange my life and include every night after work and any free time, if possible, to keep up with the class momentum.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

Early mornings, in the evenings after work, and at weekends.

Make sure you are ready with a schedule to maximise your study time. Photo by Aron Visuals on Unsplash.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

Usually, at the beginning of each new module, I read through the overall module components, obtained an outlook on how many units per module and, which topic per unit, what was the assignment requirement to think about during the module time. Looking for an assignment topic was important and required more time consumed. Coming to the module’s assignment, I devoted at least a month to completing it.

Travelling and Communication

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

In fact, travelling had a positive impact on my studies. I utilized the waiting time at the airport and the flight time while in the aeroplane to read books, paper, and cases and think about that. Travel helped me refresh my knowledge and gave me the time to consider the subject from different angles, which enabled me to come up with more new ideas and deeply understand the discussion objective.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

It did not matter if we were in a different time zone from each other. We were able to connect directly in the class discussion forums. There was a window for you to leave any message you would like to ask the professor; you were also able to recognize who was online at the same time you were online so that you could connect them via module forum or by email easily as each classmate and professor also had an email which was told to us. Thanks to technology, I experienced that my classmates were prompt in their responses despite being in different time zones. Besides, at the beginning of each module, there was an introduction session, and via that, we set up another class group chat like on WhatsApp.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online master’s student look like for you?

It becomes a routine and feels normal to me!

Any advice?

Photo by Medienstürmer on Unsplash.

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

  1. Order recommended books for each module: Whether you plan to purchase a hardcopy or soft copy book, you should well plan this. Make sure you have the book ready with you before the module’s starting time so that you can refer to the books. This will facilitate your learning.
  2. Prepare your finances to pay for school fees on time and to purchase online books (if required).
  3. Time dedicated to the study is significant. You should plan it in advance and follow it strictly. With a scheduled study plan, you will know what to expect.
  4. All of your classmate’s comments and discussions in each module forum will add value to your learnings.
  5. Please do not hesitate to ask or comment or share. The more you ask, comment, and share, the more you are valued by the professor and your classmates.
  6. Read more: including recommended books, papers, and discussions. These are valuable sources for your study. 

Thank you, and enjoy your learning!


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

5 ways to develop Self-Discipline!

Over the years, I have developed a lot of bad habits. It is not difficult to develop bad habits, and I have collected them since my university days.

I have worked hard to get rid of some of these habits and have failed more often than not, and it has been my experience that the single biggest reason for my failures has been the lack of self-discipline.

Photo by Brett Jordan on Unsplash.

So, I figured the first thing I had to do was work on my self-discipline. Of course, developing self-discipline will benefit all aspects of your life, not just helping in kicking your bad habits. I imagined my self-discipline to be that aspect of my willpower that blocked temptation from removing logic from my mind.

My thinking was simple. Why am I tempted to do something that is not beneficial to me? The answer – is because I enjoyed doing it. I had experienced that thing that tempted me many times before, and I wanted to experience it again. I needed a shield that blocked the temptation with logic and reason.

The following are five tips that I followed to help me develop my self-discipline. Hopefully, it will help you get started as well. 

1. Give yourself a purpose

Figure out why you are doing what you are doing! Photo by Austin Chan on Unsplash.

The worst habit I developed during my university days was smoking cigarettes. Over the years, I tried several times to kick this habit, and I succeeded many times. Try as I might, I just could not kick the habit.

When my wife and I decided to have our first child, I decided to quit smoking, not for my health but the health of my child. And that was the purpose I needed to quit smoking finally. Every time I felt the need to smoke, I thought about my purpose and stopped myself.

Find your purpose, and it will give you the reason and strength to persevere.

2. Information to drive the purpose

Following up on the previous point, once you have your purpose, it might not be enough. For the mind to accept the purpose, there have to be reasons. So do your research on what you intend to achieve and back up your purpose with facts. For example, when I decided to quit smoking cigarettes, the purpose or reason for me to quit smoking was my child, but I also backed it up with facts on the benefits of quitting smoking cigarettes. On how smoking had a detrimental effect on not only my health but also the health of my family.

3. Make it a habit

Once you have achieved the self-discipline required to achieve your goal, you must constantly work on maintaining this self-discipline. It is very easy to lose focus once you have achieved your goals, and then you will lose all the hard work and effort you put into developing the self-discipline required to achieve your goals. And then you will have to start all over again to achieve the same goal. So, once you have reached your goal, maintain the self-discipline required. Develop it into a habit.

4. Teamwork

Teamwork works. Photo by Hannah Busing on Unsplash.

My wife and a group of her friends wake up very early in the morning and go for a long fast walk. They all do this six days a week (weather and health permitting). She can do this because of the strength, motivation, and competition she can get from her friends. They wear smartwatches that track the group activity and can push each other to achieve their goals. When she started, she was alone and did not have the drive to get up every day in the wee hours of the morning to go for a walk, and she used to give up constantly. But now, because of this group, it is possible.

So, don’t live on an island with a population of one, and take the support from friends, colleagues and mentors when possible.

5. Reward yourself

It is essential to acknowledge your victories, even if no one else does. So, celebrate it, pat yourself on the back and maybe even reward yourself when you achieve a milestone in developing your self-discipline.


Hopefully, these five tips will help you develop your self-discipline and achieve your goals. If you have any other tips that might help our readers improve their self-discipline, please share them here.   

If you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree, and are ready to challenge yourself, look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

6 questions to ask before deciding to do an online Master’s Degree programme

Deciding whether to do a master’s degree is a tough decision, and in some cases, it might even be an inevitable decision.

It is a tough decision if you have been out of the school environment for a few years – getting back to school can be challenging. You might have a family of your own, and from experience, I know it is a significant financial and time commitment. Then there are the pressures and deadlines you have to meet at your job, and I am sure there are many other personal obstacles unique to the individual. And the decision becomes inevitable as it is one of the options available to help you continue to grow – as a person and in your career.

Photo by Joan Kwamboka on Unsplash.

So, when is the right time to do a master’s degree programme? I can’t answer that for you, but the following are six points to consider that might help you make an informed decision.

1. Passion for the subject

With so many distractions and commitments vying for your attention, if you choose to do a programme that you have little interest in studying, chances are, it will be pushed right to the bottom of the list of your priorities. You will end up taking very little away from the programme and might end up performing poorly in your evaluations and even failing the course.

Photo by Randalyn Hill on Unsplash.

I suggest you choose a subject you are passionate about, something you want to learn. Your interest will naturally result in you putting in the effort to learn and will result in better overall performance in your evaluations.

2. Relevance of the subject

For most working professionals, time is precious. So, there has to be a reason for every extra calicular thing you plan on doing. If you intend to do a master’s degree and are not passionate about the subject, then the next best option (or even the primary option) is choosing a programme that will benefit you professionally. Something that adds knowledge to what you are already doing professionally or, at the very least, helps your growth in your career.

3. Are you a self-starter?

Unlike an on-campus programme where you are physically present in class on a daily basis, guided every step of the way by a professor and closely interact with other students. In an online programme, you are in the driver’s seat; the onus is up to you to complete assignments on time, put time aside to study regularly, and take the initiative to do all you can to complete the programme successfully.  

But this does not mean you will not have any support. At least in the case of Robert Kennedy College, with our online campus and library, online forums, live classroom sessions, student care and last but not least, the online residency, you will have lots of support in completing the programme!

4. Accreditation and Recognition

If you are going to do an online master’s degree, then make sure the degree you earn has value. Find out:

  • Which university will award the degree?
  • What is the reputation of the university?
  • How is the university accredited?

These are just three questions to help you get started. Think of more relevant questions, and don’t be afraid to ask.

Want to know more about the universities we have an exclusive partnership with? Click here to learn more!

5. Is it all a façade?

You have to know what you are signing up for? Is the college just going to give you some online study material and then wash their hands off you? Ask:

  • Who are going to be your teachers?
  • Is there trial access you can have to get a feel of how the programme is run?
  • Can you talk with current students or alumni to get feedback?
  • How are the evaluations done?
  • What are the modules involved in the programme?

Again, these are just a few questions to help you get started.

At Robert Kennedy College, you can Chat Live on WhatsApp with our Education Advisors and ask all your questions, ask them about our programmes and our key faculty members, open a trial account to access our OnlineCampus or request to connect with our alumni.

6. Fees

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash.

Finally, the fees – is the programme something that you can financially handle? What are the payment terms? Does the company you are employed with have a sponsorship programme?


These points are just six simple tips to help you ask the right questions before joining an online master’s degree programme. Please share any other questions you deemed necessary to help you make an informed decision.

If you are ready to apply for one of our programmes, click here.

7 ways to better understand your Sleep Cycle

Photo by Alexander Possingham on Unsplash.

When I was growing up, sleeping was one of my favourite things to do. I used to sleep late but could just keep sleeping and wake up late. But as I grew older and with responsibility ever-increasing, sleeping late soon became a thing of the past. Unfortunately, I had gotten into the habit of sleeping late (something I still haven’t gotten over), resulting in less sleep than I liked.

Our regular readers might have noticed that we have covered “sleep” in several of our previous blogs, either on its own or as an essential part of another self-improvement blog. This is because almost every study highlights the importance of a healthy sleep cycle.

But what constitutes a healthy sleep cycle? The following are seven tips to help you identify what makes a healthy sleep cycle.

1.    There is no such thing as a “golden rule”

Do you really need eight hours of sleep? Photo by Mpho Mojapelo on Unsplash.

How often have we been advised “always to get at least 8 hours of sleep a day”? If I had a penny for every time someone told me that, I would at least have close to a pound by now. This golden rule has become so ingrained in our psyche that for most of us if we don’t get eight hours of sleep, we feel worn out the next day. The fact is, for most of us, the ideal daily requirement of sleep is between seven and nine hours, dependent on several factors such as fatigue levels, the time we go to sleep, etc.

Then there are those lucky few who, according to the National Institute of Health, have a unique gene that enables them to require only four to five hours of sleep daily for optimal and regular performance.

So, figure out what is your “golden rule”!

2.    Reduced sleep does not increase efficiency

For those of us who lead a busy life, it might seem that there are never enough hours in a day. We might try to make up for this by reducing the number of hours we get to sleep [because where else can you get the time? (I am being sarcastic here)], let’s say by reducing an hour of sleep from our ideal sleep cycle. Now, if we do this for an entire week, that is seven hours taken away from our ideal sleep cycle, and if we think this would not have an impact on us, we would be wrong. All you will achieve is increasing your fatigue levels and reducing your productivity.

3.    Bored vs Sleepy

Photo by Tony Tran on Unsplash.

Another way of identifying if you are getting adequate sleep per your ideal sleep cycle is by noticing if you are falling asleep at unexpected times during the day. Maybe in class or at a meeting, or even at the movies. If you are otherwise healthy and tend to fall asleep at unexpected times, you are not getting adequate sleep. It is not because you are lazy or bored. You can be bored as hell in a class and still be wide awake.

So, check your sleep cycle, maybe increase an hour to the cycle and see if there is an improvement.

4.    Identify your sleep cycle

No one said a sleep cycle must be continuous. Let’s say your ideal sleep cycle is 7 hours a day. If you can sleep the seven hours continuously, that is great, but if you can’t, consider breaking up the cycle, five hours at night and two hours midday. Experiment and find out what sleep cycle works for you.

5.    Older people need less sleep

False! While it is true that children and teenagers might require more sleep to cater to their growing bodies. Once you are an adult, your ideal sleep cycle will remain consistent. So, even if your sleep schedule moves around a bit during your life, your ideal sleep cycle length should stay the same.

6.    Temperature control

Photo by Markus Winkler on Unsplash.

I hate warm and cosy! I just can’t sleep when it is warm, and I just sweat buckets. I like my room cold (the exact opposite of my wife’s); usually, the temperature in my room is set to about sixteen degrees centigrade. And this is what I need to get a comfortable night’s sleep. Find out what works for you and what will help you achieve your ideal sleep cycle.

7.    Too much sleep

Just like getting too little sleep, getting too much sleep can also be detrimental to a person’s mental and physical health. According to a study listed in the National Library of Medicine, “In the general population, sleeping too much was associated with psychiatric diseases and higher body mass index (BMI)”.

So, stick to your ideal sleep cycle and don’t think you can make up for the loss of sleep by sleeping extra a couple of days a week.


Hopefully, these seven tips will help you manage your ideal sleep cycle better, thereby improving your quality of life and improving your work-life-study balance. If you have any other tips that might help our readers manage their sleep cycle better, please share them here.   

If you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree, and are ready to challenge yourself, look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

6 ways to manage your time better!

For some of us, there are never enough hours in a day. No matter what we do, we just don’t seem to be able to do all that we intend to do before the end of the day. We just end up overworking (what I mean by “work” here is not only related to our jobs but to all the tasks we need to get done during the day), taking away more from the “me” time.

Get more done by managing your time better. Photo by Kevin Ku on Unsplash.

But the fact is, for most of us, the main reason we don’t have enough time to complete everything we have to get done, is that we tend to simply over-think or don’t know how to make a plan and then stick to it or we simply procrastinate.

In fact, one of the reasons why more and more people are choosing to study online is because they don’t have the time to do a full-time or on-campus executive programme and an online programme help in managing time better by freeing up time.

The following are six ways to help you manage your time better. Hopefully, incorporating some of these tips in your life will not only help you manage your student life better but also improve your work-life balance.

(1) Try not to multitask!

Most of us think we are capable of multitasking. But the fact is 97.5% of us are incapable of multitasking, and when we hear this fact, most of us think we fall into that 2.5% capable of multitasking. So, let’s be realistic and assume we are incapable of multitasking and focusing on completing just one task at a time. You will find that your brain will be less tired when focusing on just one task, and you will be able to complete the task effectively and efficiently.

(2) Schedule Everything!

I have no idea how many times I have mentioned this point, but the key to managing time better is planning your day, your week, your month and broadly, even your year (wait, doesn’t this sound like part of a song?). People who use a calendar know how useful it can be to increase efficiency. The organiser/calendar is a tool that can be far more useful than reminding you of your next meeting. Create a calendar that contains every minutia of your daily activities for the week/month/quarter (however long you can go), from household chores to study/work deadlines. Then populate the calendar with your family’s schedule; this will give you a good idea of your schedule, inform you when to expect distractions from your family, and help you plan for it.

(3) Separate the logical from the creative

It is said that the human brain is divided into two halves – the creative side and the logical side. If we are engaged in a logic related activity, immediately shifting to a creative activity will cause us to stutter and stall. So, when you plan your day or week, make sure there is a clear divide between the two activities to give your brain the time to reorient itself. So, maybe logical mornings and creative afternoons?

(4) Stacking tasks

This point is a logical follow-up to the previous point. Stack similar tasks together. It sounds so logical and straightforward; if you have to do similar or continual tasks, then by stacking them together, you will increase your work efficiency and save time. Check your calendar and let me know how much stacking you have done?

(5) Just let go and be free

Photo by Samuel Regan-Asante on Unsplash.

It is never a good idea to revel in the glories of the past or wallow in the miseries of failure. If you have had success, celebrate it and then move on to your next assignment or challenge. If you have failed, then you have failed – analyse it, learn from it, and move on. Don’t get stuck in the past, you will just end up wasting time.

(6) Have a Goal

Goals give you something to work towards. How does this help you in managing time better? Well, all the other points I mentioned here will become moot if you don’t have anything you are working towards. All your planning, achievements and work ethics goes out of the window if you don’t have a goal you are working towards. So, if you don’t have a goal, then what is the point of even reading this blog? You have already achieved everything in life.


These points are just six simple tips to help you manage time better. I would appreciate it if you would share your tips on time management. What has worked best for you?

If you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree, and are ready to challenge yourself, look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Tahera Sultana

Continuing with our series of blogs that answer some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get asked frequently by students looking to join one of our online programmes. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

Let’s learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student!

Be disciplined and prepared to devote time and energy to the course.

Tahera Sultana

An Introduction

Photo by Vladislav Klapin on Unsplash.

Who are you?

Hi, my name is Tahera Sultana (it means pure). I am female, married with no children. I am also a Compliance Officer and have worked for different financial institutions for more than 20 years.

Which programme did you choose and why?

I am studying the Master of Laws (LLM) programme. I have been working in the compliance field for over twenty years, and I find more of my colleagues and subordinates are law graduates. I thought to myself, if I pursue a law degree, I could enhance my knowledge grow beyond being a Compliance Officer.

The Study Plan

Photo by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I am a full-time employee and a part-time student. Before starting a module, I will understand the module requirement that I am about to enrol. Each week, I print out all presentation material and listen to the recorded lecture; I make my notes and review the lecture a few times until I can digest the topic. I spent approximately one hour per week on lectures and 2-3 hours reading time for the required chapter in the module.

I spent most of the time working on my given assignment. The research process takes up to 10 hours. After reading the related material, I will start writing the paper. As I have done three modules so far in the programme, writing time takes up to 5-6 hours per 1,000 words. As a full-time employee, I work on my assignment in the evening and during the weekend. Assignment time is not an easy task for me, but a very fruitful experience. I enjoy writing on meaningful and interesting topics.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

I had no choice in choosing my study time. For me, after work is the most suitable time to study. If I had a choice, I would have chosen early mornings to do my studies. For the most part, weekends are not good for me because I work from Monday to Friday, from 9:00 am to 7:30 pm (normal office hours is 9 to 6, but in Hong Kong, we have unofficial long working hours). Over the weekend, I go hiking and spend time with my family. If I have to complete an assignment, I will work extra hours during the week to meet the deadline. I will also skip hiking and family time to achieve the goal.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

Every 1000 words will take me approximately 5-6 hours of writing time. I devote approximately 20 to 22 hours to each assignment (excluding research & reading material).

Travelling and Communication

The challenges of learning while travelling. Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash.

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

I find it very hard to study if I have to travel. I may skip one weeks’ lecture and catch up in the coming weeks, i.e., after my business travel. If I have to submit an assignment during my travel, I carry all my research material onto the aircraft and work during the flight. I remember, it was late Jan 2020, I had to fly from Hong Kong to London; I worked 10 hours on the flight. Fortunately, I had three hours of sleep during that trip.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

Interacting with peers and professors is no big deal in these modules. We have once or twice zoom / Blue Jean meetings in each module. I am not concerned about the time difference, as I am in Asia; 3:00 pm London/Swiss time is 9:00 pm Hong Kong time. That suits me, for I can join after office hours. However, when I am travelling, there will be a problem with the change in the time difference, and I might end up missing the meeting. At one time I remember I used my computer in the hotel during my business trip to interact with the whole class; I could not hear clearly what they were discussing due to hotel Wi-Fi.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

I find myself glad that there is an online course that I can take advantage of. I can still work as a full-time employee and study during my off-hours, although it is not an easy task when there is travelling involved. I take pride in my decision to gain a Master’s degree; I understand that hard work is needed, and I know this will help me progress and enhance to the next level.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Be disciplined and prepared to devote time and energy to the course. Know that all classmates are your partners, and the professors are very experienced and are there to help you succeed. I am glad that I made a good choice to achieve my Master’s degree.


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and for details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

Are you feeling Stuck in Life? Here are 4 tips to help you to start getting UNSTUCK.

What do you do when you find yourself stuck? Photo by Fernando Jorge on Unsplash.

Life can get complicated. At any given point, most of us will be juggling multiple roles simultaneously – father, son, husband, student, teacher, employee, employer, manager, subordinate, the list goes on. Managing all these roles effectively and efficiently can get stressful, and there may be times when we just get stuck.

The feeling of getting stuck is, at least in my opinion, a common and recurring aspect of life. It happens to everyone, and when it happens in one aspect of life, it can easily affect other aspects of life.

For example, let’s say you are facing a challenge at work that you cannot overcome no matter how much you put your mind to finding a solution. You are STUCK. Before you know it, or rather, without even being aware of it, this will slowly start affecting other aspects of your life. Let’s say you are also doing an online master’s degree programme and have a deadline to submit an assignment, but all you can think is how you are falling behind at work, and before you know it, that mindset of being stuck at work has now spread to your student life as well. And now this feeling of being stuck has been compounded and will start affecting more aspects of your life.

Hopefully, you will be able to nip this feeling of being stuck in the bud before it starts affecting something significant (again, in my opinion) like being a father, husband and son.

Like most things in life, there are a number of ways to get UNSTUCK and again, these are habits that you have to cultivate. Here are four easy ways to help you get started:

(1) Do not label: We just love to label everything, don’t we? Especially if it is something bad. Let’s say we haven’t achieved our targets at work for a couple of months; how many times have we cribbed, cried, and complained, saying it has been a bad couple of months or saying that we are going through bad times at work. When we label something as “bad”, we tend to write it off or give up. We move on, and there is no scope for improvement or learning from the mistakes committed.

Getting stuck labelling. Photo by Victor He on Unsplash.

Conversely, when we label something as good, we set that as the benchmark and limit our potential.

No matter how low we hit or how high we peak, there is always scope for learning, growing, and improving. So, don’t label anything as good or bad!

(2) Let go of baggage: As in the above point, your baggage can be good or bad. It is never a good idea to revel in the glories of the past or wallow in the miseries of failure. If you have had success, celebrate it – but only for a day, then move on to your next assignment or challenge. If you have failed, then you have failed – analyse it, learn from it, and move on – again, only for a day. Never let your wallowing in failure outstrip your celebration of success – find a balance. If you get stuck in the past, it will be difficult to get unstuck.

(3) Always have a goal: This is probably the most cliched and overused advice given in the history of advice. There is a reason for that – it is an important point and a point that works. Regardless of whether they are short term or long term, goals give you a direction, something to aim for (a destination) and a yardstick to measure your progress. As long as you have a goal or goals to work towards, there will be very little opportunity for your mind to wander, and you get stuck in inaction and demotivation. Having goals protect you.

Photo by Markus Winkler on Unsplash.

(4) Ask for help: If you find yourself getting stuck, maybe it is time for a change in perspective. We often tend not to see what is right in front of us, what is perhaps obvious to others, and unless we ask for help, no one will know we are struggling and stuck and therefore will not point the obvious out to us. Of course, there are many different people we could ask for help – from professionals to trusted friends/family or colleagues to your neighbouring know-it-all five-year-old. You have to identify what level of help you require and have the courage to seek it out.


These points are just four simple tips to help you get started on getting unstuck, and I would appreciate it if you shared with us what worked for you in getting unstuck.

If you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree, and are ready to challenge yourself, look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and for details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

Robert Kennedy College and York St John University Graduation – Class of 2021

For most of us, isolation has been a big part of the last couple of years. There are a lot of unique opportunities and experiences that we have missed out on because of the lockdowns and limited travel options. Because of COVID-19 protocols, many universities had suspended graduation ceremonies, resulting in many students missing out on the “cherry on the cake” and not being able to experience the graduation ceremony. 

Last week York St John University celebrated their students by conducting the graduation ceremony at York Minster. Thirty-four proud Robert Kennedy College students also attended the graduation ceremony to receive their degree certificates.

Group photo of RKC Class of 2021 Graduation @YorkStJohn, with a few friends from other colleges

The ceremony was a happy occasion for the graduating students who worked hard to earn their master’s degrees. They celebrated it with their fellow students, the faculty and their families. To celebrate the occasion the Mayor and Sheriff of York were also present.

RKC students can be seen getting the award at 45.17, 54.47 and 59.53

If you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree, and are ready to challenge yourself, look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

If you have already made up your mind, click here to apply.