#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student at RKC – Vernon W

Here’s presenting another gem of our #dilo -a day in the life of RKC student series. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions and give feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning.

There is no better way to learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student! Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am an entrepreneur in charge of a couple of SMEs in the Caribbean. I had to delay embarking on the ‘MBA journey’ as for many years I would work up to 16 hours/day. But alas, MBA was always one of by 2020 ‘Things to do’ so I embarked on the journey mainly because of this reason. A plan must be executed.

Which programme did you choose and why?

MBA Leadership & Sustainability.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

Prior to MBA, I read widely on many subject areas, so that helped me while studying. Unfortunately, notwithstanding all my good plans at the beginning of each module, most times I would get started late. In reality, I must run two companies first – then study. I try to put in 3 hours, 3 times per week. Sometimes I get in as much as a full day – usually because I was behind and had to catch up.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

I study better at quiet times such as evenings and weekends would work best for me. This means I have to spend a lot of time planning ahead to reduce competing personal and business priorities. Most of the time when I settle down to study, I made sure I have little or no distractions.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?  

Usually, I use less than the recommended time. If the recommended time for preparation is say, 2 weeks, I have to get it done in half the time. This means reading all the recommended material and external material. As I said, I really try to read widely.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Travelling and Communication  

How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

Little or none at all. Prior to MBA I advised my associates that I did not wish to travel much until MBA is completed and so far so good. I do not do a lot of local travelling.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

For my business, I use a suitable app communicate with multiple people in different time zones. I simply added Zurich to the list. Not much trouble there and the time stamp on the study portal helps.

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

A full day of work and then some studies. Some days I get in up to say 1 hour during the work day (his happens say once or twice weekly). During this time, I participate in the learning forum. The forum is a healthy place to learn other perspectives so I go back to read other students’ posts whenever I miss them. These are very important – similar to being in a physical class room.

At the end of the day, I try to put in more time before heading home, and if unsuccessful, try to make up before heading off to sleep.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

Yes. I do not think I am a poster student for giving advice to students on this topic as I am working daily to improve my own scheduling. I think my present mode is at about 70% and based on grades thus far it is clear to me that all I have to do is get some more time in. Students (and myself) could:

1. Schedule time away from work as is required. In the end, an MBA is an investment and ‘time’ is money.

2. If possible, have discourse (outside of the forum) with someone on the subject area – including via video conferencing. Great if its another student. This is also good for long-term collaboration and networking.

3. If you were pursuing MBA in a physical lecture setting, travel time, traffic and other factors would have ensured more time is spend pursuing MBA – even if some are wasted on transportation. So, while studying online result in less CO2, be careful it does not necessarily also result in less time studying.

Enjoy the benefits of this mode of study, but remember, its an investment of time and money and the returns can make a big difference in your life (and your family’s).

I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and answers to any questions you may have.

Newest programmes by Robert Kennedy College (RKC) – All you need to know about Bachelor’s in Business Administration

A bachelor’s programme is a stepping stone in the field of specialisation in which one wants to build their career. Bachelor’s degree is a degree awarded by a college or university in the subject of choice upon completion of undergraduate studies.

A bachelor’s degree enables you to gain advanced knowledge of the subject, learn new ideas, enhance employability skills, boost earning potential and provide networking opportunities. Obtaining a bachelor’s is usually the first step towards achieving a higher academic degree like a master’s or doctorate.

 A bachelor’s degree is usually the first step towards achieving a higher academic degree

While a bachelor’s degree can be pursued soon after finishing high school, it has become increasingly common for people to undertake a programme later in life as well.

Traditionally one had to go to a university to study bachelor’s degree. But in the modern context, earning a bachelor’s degree online has become much easier.

RKC has pioneered business and legal education online for over 24 years, allowing thousands of professionals from every continent to achieve new heights in their lives and careers. Today you can benefit from our latest bachelor’s in business administration programmes.

Robert Kennedy College offers the following two bachelors programme in business administration:

  1. Diploma in Business administration
  2. BA (Hons) Business Administration

Diploma in Business Administration

The diploma programme offers fundamental knowledge and understanding of business administration and management. This programme is suitable for someone looking to advance their career in any industry, equipped with advanced business intellect to help improve businesses and their operations.

Five reasons to study Diploma in Business Administration:

  1. The Diploma is delivered in partnership with the University of Cumbria, rated in the top 10 in the UK for developing business leaders and ranks 14th overall in the Top 50 universities for business.
  2. The course can be studied entirely online to graduate in just nine months. 
  3. Enhance your employability with strong problem-solving aptitude, practical business knowledge and skills and applied leadership.
  4. No traditional examination system, but one learns through real-life case studies, essays and assignments.
  5. Gain entry to the next step in your career: study Bachelor’s BA (Hons) in Business Administration.
 The course can be studied entirely online to graduate in just nine months

The programme consists of the following six Level 5 modules. Each module is worth 20 credits:

Organisational Behaviour

Services Marketing

Culture and International Business Systems

Corporate Social Responsibility in Practice

Global Economics 

Operations Management

BA (Hons) in Business Administration

BA (Hons) in Business Administration is a bachelor’s degree programme offered by the University of Cumbria, UK, ranked 8th in the world (Times higher education impact rankings). The programme is provided exclusively to the RKC’s diploma graduates who have gained a solid foundational knowledge of business subjects.

University of Cumbria, UK

The programme is delivered online and can be completed in as little as 12 months.

The bachelor’s programme consists of four modules. The Level 6 modules total 120 credits, including a 40 credits independent business project:

Business Psychology (20 credits)

International Marketing (20 credits)

Global Business (20 credits)

International Human Resource Management (20 credits)

Business Independent Project (40 credits)

Upon successful completion, an internationally recognised British Honours degree is awarded by the University of Cumbria.

 Upon successful completion, an internationally recognised British Honours degree is awarded by the University of Cumbria.

The bachelor’s programme serves as a solid base to launch and spearhead a career in business. Apply online today and become part of a professional network of business students. Chat live on WhatsApp with our education advisors to learn more about the admission procedure, eligibility requirements, fee structure, payment plan and upcoming intakes.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Andy Wertheim

This series has fast become one of our most appreciated blog posts. This “day in the life of” series focuses on the challenges and rewards our students derive from doing an online master’s degree with us, and we have been blessed with students who were more than happy to volunteer their time and share their experiences.

There is no better way to learn than from those who came before and see if what worked for them will work for you. It will help you become a better student and, hopefully, help you make an informed decision.

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am Andy Wertheim, a Robert Kennedy College and University of Cumbria MBA student.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I planned to allocate a certain number of hours per week on fixed evenings and the occasional weekend, but it didn’t work out that way. I’m definitely a “deadlines” person, so the regular modular structure of the course helped keep things ticking along nicely, with draft essays and other assignments keeping me focused on making good progress. It became more of a challenge with the dissertation as there was a) a hiatus after finishing the last essay and then being allowed to start the dissertation, so I completely lost momentum, and, b) there were no intermediate milestones/deadlines to keep me ticking along. As a result, I had to be much more disciplined and ended up taking blocks of time off work to complete the dissertation. I clearly needed to get up a head of steam and tackle sections in a block rather than do a little often with stop-start not working for me.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

As mentioned above, longer blocks of time suited me best rather than a particular time of day. That said because I was also doing a full-time job and other activities, I was mostly restricted to evenings and weekends.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

Unknown, sorry – I didn’t keep a log.

Travelling and Communication

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

Work travel tends to be occasional long-haul flights for me, which helped as I could download relevant reading and could then take notes, etc., on the flight. Most of my study time, however, was spent at home.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors, given the time differences?

The forums were okay, but this is the biggest issue with remote courses, in my experience. You simply don’t get the same level of interaction, shared learning and general camaraderie / shared experience as you do with face-to-face learning. This was particularly noticeable with the excellent week-long sustainability residential in Cumbria, especially when juxtaposed against the comparative isolation (even loneliness) of the dissertation. The benefits of remote learning definitely outweigh the restrictions, however.

My advice

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

Lots of evening reading during the modules, completing the interim assignments and then a bigger burst of effort in 2-3 day blocks for the final assessment submissions. The dissertation was a whole new ball game with longer blocks of time needed to really focus on getting the job done.

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

I can only suggest people find their own rhythm – if you’re very disciplined, then a little often may work for you, but I’m not like that, so had to adapt to fit my own way of working within the wider context of work and MBA deadlines.


We at Robert Kennedy College are here to support you through the entire process and encourage you to get in touch with our team of Education Advisors and chat with them Live on WhatsApp if you have any questions about our programmes, fee structure, the application process, or details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

If you have already made up your mind and are ready to apply, then just click here.

All you need to know about Robert Kennedy College

The first thing anyone interested in enrolling for higher education in a college or University does is to check its legitimacy. And no surprises here, this is one of the top questions our education advisors get asked all the time – Tell me more about the college and partnership with British universities. 

So, here is everything you need to know about RKC!

Number one of Number one: Who are we? An Introduction

Robert Kennedy College is a private educational institution based in Zürich, Switzerland. The College is a pioneer in Swiss quality online education offering rigorous but flexible learning programmes, through enhanced state of the art online e-learning technology that has been developed in-house entirely.

Exclusive Partnerships

The Robert Kennedy College online master’s and bachelor’s programmes are offered in an exclusive partnership with the University of Cumbria, the University of Salford, and York St John University

Student focused teaching

RKC’s online learning community greatly values and invests in each of its student. Here you get an opportunity to be a part of a prestigious international community of over 5000 students from 130 different countries and some world-class faculty. Chat with our education advisor to get your customized study plan.

World-class faculty

As a student at RKC, you will learn from some of best professors in the education field. 

RKC’s dean Dr. iur. David Costa is one of the founders of Robert Kennedy College. In his current capacity as Dean of Faculty, he oversees the faculty review process and several of the college’s academic programmes. He lectures at Robert Kennedy College in Contracts Law, Transnational Business Law, Investment Law and Money Management, and is a frequent guest on business TV channels such as CNBC Europe and Bloomberg Television. 

Our instructors are graduates from some of the best universities worldwide. Other key faculty members are Prof. David Duffil, Dr. Radu Negoescu, Dr. Alistair Benson and, Emeritus Prof. Gabriel Jacobs.

Unique course plan with one-week residency

Our programmes combine best of both worlds by offering Swiss quality education online via OnlineCampus with one-week residencies. The one-week residency represents a unique opportunity for students to work in groups, focus on case studies and get a head start for their dissertation. Residency offers a great opportunity to interact with fellow students and professors and learn from professional experiences of students from all over the world. Chat with our education advisor to get your customized study plan. 

Worldwide recognition

One of the best advantages of studying master’s at RKC is that at the end of the programme, an internationally recognised full-time British degree is awarded by the University. 

The University of Cumbria, University of Salford and York St John University are fully recognised by the British Government and duly listed on the United Kingdom’s Department for Education list of recognised UK awarding institutions. You can verify their official University status directly at the UK Government Website.

Flexible payment plans

At RKC we understand the importance of work-study-life balance. This is why we offer flexible payment plan where you can pay fees in interest free instalments. Check out the sample payment plan here.

With the above information, RKC ticks all boxes from the ideal online programme institution list. Go ahead and download our course catalogue and start your application online now.

Happy New Year! Now, it is time for Resolutions!

Let me start by wishing all our readers a Happy and Prosperous New Year, 2023!

And now that we are into the New Year, like many others, I look back at 2022 and see what I could have done better. Once I figure out what could have been done better, I try to put them into resolutions to be improved upon.

The truth is, I am not a big fan of resolutions. They have hardly ever worked for me, and when I fail, it makes me feel bad. But, on the other hand, the times I have succeeded, man, did it feel good. Success begets success, and when I succeed in achieving a resolution, it just makes me want to push myself to accomplish another.

But there are some resolutions I tend to make almost every year, and they fail every time! Sometimes, I don’t even get off the starting block.

So, this is what I have learnt about choosing New Year resolutions and making them work.

1. Choose something achievable

No one likes to fail; if you fail, it will demotivate you and could result in failing other goals. However, if you succeed, you could use the success to work towards achieving your other goals. So, the first and most crucial step is to choose achievable New Year resolutions – goals you have been delaying. If you are worried that this is not ambitious enough, think of these “lesser resolutions” as a stepping stone to achieving your greater goals.

2. Be specific

Most of us just set broad goals to achieve as our New Year resolution. You want to lose weight – set a target; want to go to the gym regularly – how many times a week?; want to save more money – set a monthly/weekly budget. You get the idea. And this leads to my next point.

3. Break it up

Sometimes, a goal might seem too far to achieve. Let’s say your New Year resolution is to lose 20 kilos. Just looking at that number can be demotivating. So, break it up into achievable monthly targets of 2 kilos, and then in 10 months, you will reach your goal. Once you break up your goals, don’t look at the bigger target; focus on the lesser, more achievable goal.

4. Keep track and pat yourself on the back

Keep track of your progress as you work towards your goals, and pat yourself on the back when you achieve milestones. Achieving milestones will keep you motivated and help you achieve your goals.

5. Don’t give up

Failure is part of life; every failure is a learning experience. Cliché, I know, but it is a fact. Everybody fails, but that doesn’t mean you give up; start over tomorrow. It’s not like all your hard work will be wiped out with a single failure or multiple failures – pick up from your last success.

6. You are not alone

As for help. If you are struggling to achieve a goal, don’t be too proud to ask for help from friends or family. My friend and I joined a gym last year, and we pushed each other to go regularly to the gym. I have never been as regular to a gym, and I credit my friend for making me regularly go to the gym last year. Granted, he did almost all the pushing, but I like to think that pushing me to be regular pushed him to go to the gym.


Have I missed any points you feel can help someone stick to their resolutions? Let us know in the comments below.

If your resolution is to do a master’s degree or learn something new, then explore the number of specialised master’s degree programmes offered by Robert Kennedy College through exclusive partnerships with top British universities. Or, if you have already made up your mind, click here to apply.

Be Merry this Holiday Season

The most beautiful time of the year is here! It’s merry and bright with the town’s festivities, decorations, hustle, and bustle. It is almost the end of the year, and everyone wants to enjoy some time off, relax, take break from studies and work, and spend time with their families, friends, neighbours, and colleagues. Seems like all jovial and merry time to me! However, are holidays always like that?

Photo Credit: Canva.com

Well, the demands of the holiday season – shopping, cooking elaborate festive menus with exotic dishes (thanks to social media..), baking, cleaning, entertaining, and making the season its festive best (and the list is exhaustive…phew!) – can prove to be an overwhelming time.

One of my friends told me she was planning to bake 12 cakes, one for each of her neighbours with whom she is a good friend. Her husband suggested buying cakes instead, but she wanted to give a personal touch to her gift. Wow! I am sure after baking 12 cakes, she has become a professional baker. On top of this, she had a “Secret Santa” gift exchange at work, and her kids had to do a gift exchange at their school. Well, online shopping helped her save a lot of time, but one can never wholly escape visiting the stores physically. 

Photo credit: Canva.com

I experience the same mixed feelings of excitement and pressure around festive times. While I love decorating my house, I get stressed about getting the best colour-coordinated decorations and, of course, not to mention matching Holiday sweaters for all my family. I love entertaining my friends and family at my house, but the whole process of planning, preparation and execution exhaust me.

It is advised not to get carried away with anxiety about holiday preparations. It is better to prioritise what is essential for you, keeping in view the traditions. 

Photo credit: Canva.com

Here are some helpful tips you can follow to keep stress at bay and enjoy the festivities:

  1. Plan ahead – Start your preparations in advance to stay ahead in the game. Plan, prepare and stock food for cooking and baking, and start shopping weeks in advance to avoid the last-minute rush. You will be better able to enjoy time with family and friends.
  2. Ask for help – Please know that you are not in this alone. Other family members, friends and colleagues would love to give a helping hand, assist you with getting groceries, driving around, wrapping presents, or decorating.
  3. Be organized – The key to stress-free holidays is to be super-organized. Make lists of tasks and set reminders to keep you on track.
  4. Set holiday budget – I know we are still reeling under the effect of Covid-19, and inflation is at an all-time high. We all want to make the season as festive as possible, don’t we? Under these trying times, set strict financial budgets for holiday shopping and stick to them. Think of innovative ideas to save some $$ like buying when discounts are on, buying collective gifts, organising potluck instead of doing all cooking etc.
  5. Don’t forget to breathe and exercise – Take a deep breath whenever you feel overwhelmed. With all the merry drinks and sugary cakes you will be eating, exercising will help keep those extra calories at bay. Also, exercising is relaxing and boosts new energy.
Photo credit: Canva.com

There is a lot of cultural pressure around the holidays, especially now that social media forces us to compare ourselves with the idealised notions of the holidays. I would suggest, earmark a day and some of your budget, to volunteer at a food bank, volunteer a day at a retirement home taking gifts for the elderly, or donate to a charity. Knowing that you brought smile to someone’s face and made a difference in their lives, will immensely lift your spirit (holiday spirit)! Be mindful and emphatic towards those who are struggling this holiday season.

Ultimately, it is all about sharing, giving, loving, and spending time with our loved ones – the essence of the holiday season. 

On this note, I wish all our readers Happy Holidays! Be merry, and do not worry 🙂

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Naomi Osei-Asemani

Continuing with our popular blog series that answers some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get asked frequently by students looking to join one of our online programmes, we asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

Let’s learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student!

An Introduction

Photo credit: canva.com

Who are you, really?

My name is Naomi Osei-Asemani. Professionally I work as an educationist. I am a CEO of an international school in Ghana, West Africa (Peculiar International School). I have 140 staff working under me. Personally, I love kids and anything that has to do with them, especially their upbringing and education. My school has 1,400 students ranging from ages 1-19. I am very passionate about this job; thus, I sacrifice all my life and finances for it. I also love taking care of the youth and directing them, so they don’t derail from their missions in life. I, therefore, have about five (5) students I am taking care of/sponsoring at various universities in my country Ghana. I have also given scholarships to more than twenty (20) children to attend school (basic school), some of whom I feed as well. I also like taking care of old people, and in that area, I have four elderly people (two are 85 years old) I feed and ensure their safety.

Getting back into education

Photo credit: canva.com

Your story of getting back to do a Master’s degree

What was the driving force behind your enrolling for an online degree? Who inspired you? What motivated you?

In the first place, it has been my desire for a long time to become a PhD holder one day in my life. Secondly, the industry I am in is challenging; the mode of delivering education worldwide keeps changing, and therefore, I needed and still need to upgrade myself to meet global challenges. Finally, my school runs the Cambridge IGCSE and A Level, and there is, therefore, the need to recruit staff with high qualifications and those qualified to deliver the curriculum. I, therefore, need to highly educate myself so that I don’t fall short of the knowledge and skill required to direct the affairs of the staff. Self-motivation is a global challenge that comes with human resources.

What were the thoughts/situations/people/challenges holding you back from starting (if any)? How did you overcome them?

Family issues. How will I manage schooling with my tasking job? HOW DID I OVERCOME IT? I resorted to doing all my studies at night when all the family members and my staff had retired to their beds. I did this continuously for two years.

What surprised you the most when you started your studies?

I realized that I could work and attain a master’s degree using only the night to study. I thought I could do that because I worked so hard during the day and cared for my family after work. But I could pull through even though it was a bit tough.

Do you feel there are unique challenges women face when deciding to get back into education?

Yes, women face issues with their husbands, childcare and the fact that society generally doesn’t expect higher education from women. My friends think a bachelor’s degree should be enough since I own a business. To the society around me: “what else are you looking for in life”? Also, challenges with workplace issues, especially when women are working for other employers. The challenges are lack of funds to sponsor oneself to school, tight work schedules, and traffic to get back home.

Getting the degree

Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

The work to get the degree – what did you learn, how did you balance, what would you do differently

Which programme did you do? Why?

I did MA in Leading Innovation and Change (MALIC) – This programme has been discontinued, and has reincarnated as a 100% online MBA programme in Leading Innovation and Change. I chose this course because,

  1. I needed to learn more about leadership because I needed to become a better leader than I was.
  2. I was attracted to the innovation part because of the changing trends in education delivery and changes in technology.
  3. Climate change is happening all around us.

I thought this course would help me acquire the requisite knowledge to combat these issues.

What is the single most important thing you learned during the programme?

One most important thing I learnt is that, culture is like an iceberg; what we see happening in the organization is just the tip of the iceberg. The bigger part of organizational culture is very much embedded in the attitudes and behaviours of people, and changing the culture is not as easy as we think.

Michael Watkins sees Culture as a form of protection that has evolved from situational pressures. With this, we know that culture evolves, so as the people grow in the organization, the culture also grows with them. I have therefore been deliberate with the kind of culture my organization is building because I have become aware of how difficult it is to change the culture we build.

How did you balance work and studies?

I work during the day and study during the night.

Any particular challenges to being a woman and studying online, or do you think all students face the same ones?

The challenge of having to balance my responsibilities as a wife, a mother, a career woman, a CEO and a philanthropist (well, I think some other women also go through the same). Also, I did not have any physical classmates to even talk to when I faced any challenge: this aspect was very challenging.

Life post degree

What changed, if anything?

What’s new in your life since graduating / starting your studies? Any visible impact already?

Having finished my studies, I have acquired new knowledge, skills and abilities to change what is not working in my workplace. To bring new innovations and deliberately introduce organizational activities that I know can become deeply embedded in our culture.

Anything you are doing differently now because of the things you learned?

I have introduced online studies for my students and parents, which has helped during the Covid-19 crisis. I have also been able to open another school which is totally different from the schools operating in the area, and even from the current one I am operating, it is an innovation. This school will open in three months’ time. It is a combination of the Montessori and Froebel systems of education. The packaging and delivery methods are different. I am also rolling out a new system where parents can call teachers to come to their homes to help their children.

Do you feel that getting a Master’s degree or doing other online programmes can reduce gender discrimination in the workplace?

Of course, yes. Having a Master’s degree has made me bolder and more knowledgeable. My appetite for research has also increased.

Advice for other women

Photo credit: canva.com

Or other students, really.

Imagine you could send a message back in time to your pre-degree self: what would it be?

Eiiii!! Naomi, everything is possible. Don’t think of your tight schedule in your office, the needs of your staff or the number of students under you. Don’t even think your husband or your three children would be hindrances. Remember, Naomi, that with God on your side and with determination and hard work, you can make it. Also, know that you can do everything through Christ who strengthens you, so go all out and venture into any area in life you want to.

Imagine you could send an object back in time to your pre-degree self: what would it be?

A picture to motivate me.

Closing thoughts

Anything else you would like to add that could help with the goal of increasing women’s participation/access to a Master’s degree?

I want all women to know that there is nothing impossible if you are determined to do it. In the face of all the challenges we see, we can still do whatever we want to do, be whatever we want to be and get wherever we want to get. Step out to take your Master’s degree, do the RKC online degree from your home, and remember to work more during the night when everyone is asleep. Listen, the sky is no longer the limit; the moon has now won the challenge. So aspire to be better. God bless you.


If you have been thinking about getting your master’s degree, and proving to yourself and others that you CAN do it, now would be a good time to take the plunge. Have a look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything that could help.

I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for more similar blogs. You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and the discounts we might offer.

Advance your career with a master’s degree in the modern job market. Here are FIVE reasons you should study for a master’s in 2023!

Today’s job market is highly competitive and challenging. To prove your metal, one has to exhibit why you outshine in the crowd of thousands of job applicants. Higher education has increasingly become necessary for anyone seeking career advancement. And in today’s dynamic environment, just a bachelor’s degree may not suffice to get the top jobs. A master’s degree in your specialization will help expand your knowledge base and experience required to make your next career move or get the promotion.

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

The benefit of a master’s degree to you in 2023

Everyone has their reasons to pursue a master’s programme. Here are some popular ones:

1. Shield against recession and job cuts

Once you equip yourself with master’s degree knowledge and skills, you level yourself above the rest of the employees. The employer will choose the employees who are better qualified and experienced should the situation of job cuts arises. One can better their chances of sustaining their jobs and ensure job security by creating value for the company.

One can better their chances of sustaining their jobs and ensure job security by creating value for the company.

2. Building a vast professional network

While studying for a master’s, one of the benefits is that you get to interact with like-minded professionals. One gets to know people from different cultures, intellects, and business acumen from across the world. The connections you make are made from the standpoint of mutual learning and growth, which usually are impossible to make at the workplace due to competition and professional jealousy. These connections last forever. 

3. Potential of earning a higher salary package

Depending on your field – a master’s degree usually means the potential of earning a higher compensation package. Being a master’s degree graduate, you can negotiate your pay package on your terms. Employers recognise the value you bring to the table and are willing to offer compensation dollars ($$) accordingly.

4. Better probability of promotions

Having a master’s degree betters your chances for that promotion at work by raising your bar to the top candidates running in the competition. So, if you are aware of any arising opportunity for promotions at your workplace in 2023, start your application for a master’s degree now.

5. Advanced knowledge

You maybe are the head of the department running the show for the company in sales, finance, supply chain, marketing, commercial law or artificial intelligence. One feels the need for new ideas to run a business efficiently and increase profitability by implementing new/better business processes. Beyond a point, one needs to learn management and leadership skills to be a better manager and effective leader. Such knowledge can be acquired by furthering your horizon with a master’s degree.

I can extend another reason for you to start a master’s programme in 2023 with the special fee promotion. You can now join a master’s programme with a deposit of just 500 CHF. Also, benefit from discounts up to 2,100 CHF. You can connect with our education advisors on WhatsApp for a live chat to learn about the application process for intakes starting in January 2023.

What is your reason for starting a master’s in 2023? Share in the comment section below, and get started with the next steps now!

Does music help you study better? FOUR points to consider to see if it works for you!

As a kid in the 90s, I remember several adults (parents and educators mainly) going on and on about how listening to music while studying, especially western classical, will make a child smarter or help them learn subjects quicker. They said a scientific study called the Mozart effect had proven this as fact.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Hearing this had a significant impact on me at that time. I remember forcing my parents to take me to the music store to buy CDs and cassette tapes (yes, I know, it was a long time ago) of classical music, mainly Mozart and Beethoven. Now, this is music that I don’t enjoy (even though I tried really hard to like it), and I forced myself to listen to it while studying. As you can imagine, the results were not great, which was the end of that experiment. Man, did my parents lay into me for wasting money on those CDs.

But I also know many people who listen to music when they work/study, and it seems to work for them.

However, as far as the Mozart effect is concerned, since the initial study, there have been several others, and the findings have been mixed. In general, listening to music you love tends to put you in a good mood, and a positive frame of mind can, in turn, positively impact your work.

Our results on the effects of listening to Mozart’s Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major K. 448 on spatial–temporal task performance have generated much interest but several misconceptions, many of which are reflected in attempts to replicate the research. The comments by Chabris and Steele et al. echo the most common of these: that listening to Mozart enhances intelligence. We made no such claim. The effect is limited to spatial–temporal tasks involving mental imagery and temporal ordering.

Frances H. Rauscher, PhD, Co-author of the study “Music and spatial task performance”.

I love listening to my kind of music when I drive, especially on long-distance trips, and music helps me enjoy the drive and reduces the stress and fatigue I might feel otherwise. So, I can attest that music can positively impact your frame of mind and help you study better.

Here are four points you should consider when you experiment with music and see if it can positively impact your study/work.

(1) The choice of music

There is no point in listening to music you don’t like. You will be irritated and distracted if you try and force yourself to listen to music you are not interested in, which will reduce your efficiency. So, listen to music you like; it will hopefully put you in a happy frame of mind and should translate to an improved learning/working experience.

(2) Listen to music with no lyrics

I, like most people, tend to sing along with the songs I like, which can get very distracting, especially when I am trying to read and study or when I am trying to formulate sentences when writing a paper. When I am singing along with a song, that is where my focus is – on the lyrics and trying to keep pace with the beat. My focus will not be on what I am reading or writing. However, when I am doing something physical such as working out or even driving, singing along usually enhances my experience of the activity. The lyrics might even motivate me to push harder for a better result.

So, listen to music that is appropriate to the work that you are doing. When researching or writing, I usually have soft music (without lyrics) playing in the background and on repeat to not distract me from work; it is something that I enjoy and works for me. When I drive, cook, clean, or work out, it is rock, hip-hop and a bit of metal at a loud but not distracting volume, and this type of music works for me in this situation.

(3) Experiment

Don’t be afraid to experiment to find out what kind of music works for you while studying or doing a particular job. Not all music will work to give you the push you are looking for at a given time. So, mix things around and see what works for you. You might find that sometimes you just need peace and quiet to focus on a job and get it done correctly and efficiently.

(4) Limit the time

I have found that when I listen to music for too long, especially when studying, writing or researching, the effect of the boost I get from it reduces after a while and can even get a little distracting. So, I use music as a boost, something to push my focus beyond my usual. I usually start my work without music, as I am typically fresh when I start, and when I feel my focus begin to drift, I play music and recentre myself. I play something a little upbeat when I feel sluggish (usually after lunch). Music being played depends on my state of mind and need not always be on.


These are a few points that I have found work for me. Hopefully, it will work for you as well. Do you listen to music when you study? Does it help you learn better? Comment below!

If you are looking to start studying again and are looking to join a 100% online master’s degree programme, then consider joining our globally recognised master’s degree programmes. Look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might offer.

Education Leadership – It’s all about learning

Education serves as the foundation block of human society. It is a dynamic process, and education can be received from a variety of institutions all over the world. Education has seen numerous changes through the centuries and is an ever-evolving field constantly facing new challenges. Educational institutions aim at providing structured learning to develop knowledge and skills along with the holistic balance for overall growth, enabling the individual to lead a successful life. Various institutions operate to provide age-appropriate education to kids and adults.

Who is an education leader?

A leader in education is one that other educators look up to for guidance, direction, and example. An educational leader serves as a guide in an organizational setting. They operate either as sole leaders or as a team of education administrators. An education leader plays a pivotal role in determining the reputation and climate of the school. Learning communities function and thrive under the direction and vision of their leader.

What common traits make a successful (and influential) leader?

Unlike management leaders, the challenges that education leaders face are unique and diverse. There is no other industry with such constant learning as the education industry.

“Leadership is the capacity to translate vision into reality”

Education leader creates opportunities, supports processes and empowers educators. Here are some of the typical traits found in an inspirational, educational leader:

  1. An education leader is a lifelong learner
  2. An innovator, has vision and is a planner
  3. Expert in utilizing data and resources
  4. Leads by example
  5. They create collaborative, inclusive learning environments
  6. High emotional quotient and critical decision maker
  7. Has a positive and can-do attitude
  8. Excellent communicator and problem solver
  9. Empowers educators and promotes the development of leadership skills 
  10. Pivotal in community building and transpiring the values, philosophy, and ethos of the educational institution through the community

The list above is not exhaustive. 21st-century leaders operate in complex environments and are expected to be active facilitators of change.

“Change is an opportunity to do something amazing”

Education leaders must possess an in-depth understanding and knowledge of the communities’ learning requirements. In a heavily media-saturated society, the dynamism and rapidly changing education requirements are unpredictable. Still, education leaders are responsible for preparing learners for the future. Effective leaders tend to develop learning strategies focusing on the future while analyzing current education trends.

What leadership models are valid in education?

While various leadership models are adapted from the business world to the educational, theories and models regarding the role and function of education leaders have been reformed and remodelled to echo the change over time.

Here are a few of the leadership models applicable to the education sector:

Transactional leadership

Transactional leadership centres around rewards and punishments and these are made very clear from the beginning with straightforward job descriptions and expectations. The leader allocates work, and the subordinate is solely responsible for it.

Transformational leadership

This form of leadership allows dreams to take shape. A transformational leader develops a vision and implements it while taking care of their employees and giving them ample opportunity to succeed.

Servant Leadership

The servant leader puts the interest and needs of others first. The leader would share power, delegate, improve, and work for the benefit of the less privileged.

Laissez-faire Leadership

This leader’s involvement in decision-making is minimal because they allow people to make their own decisions. For this leadership style to be successful, the employees must have integrity and be self-driven.

Take a look at our list of 100% online master’s degree programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.