DILO (A day in the life of) a RKC’s master’s student – Michael Watyoka

Through the #DILO series of blog posts, we have been bringing you insights into the life of our master’s students, sharing their thoughts and opinions, ups and downs, and key learning points during their online studies. The whole idea behind this series is to make you aware of the realities of online studies and aid you in decision making.   

This week we take a look  at a day in the life of one of our master’s degree student, Michael. Here are a few insights and some words of wisdom that Michael has to share from his own experience:  

There is no better way to learn than from those who came before and see if what worked for them. It will help you become a better student and, hopefully, help you make an informed decision.

An Introduction

Which programme did you choose and why?

University of Cumbria’s MBA Masters of Business Administration in Finance and sustainability.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I wanted to complete the programme in 12 months. Since l had limited financial resources coming from Africa – Zimbabwe to be precise, l choose to fully concentrate on my Master’s and take a break from work. So I was studying full-time. Since I had a 12 months period deadline set, I was studying more than 15 hours everyday so as that I finish the programme in my stipulated time.

Photo by Jessica Lewis on Unsplash.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

Keeping my target in mind of completing the programme in 12 months, l would study from 9 am until 8pm with some breaks in between. So l can’t say any particular time of the day – it was a big sacrifice.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

When l started every module, I would go straight to the final assessment question, then will start to approach it, so that I will be ready by the time of submission which is normally after 12 weeks

Travelling and Communication

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

I had less travelling so it didn’t impact so much.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

The time zone or difference had little impact since in Africa, there are seasons will be l hour ahead or the same time zone with Zurich.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online master’s student look like for you?

It was like a normal college day for me since I was reading or researching. l was always busy.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

I put planning as the first thing. Working hard and discipline are the key pillars of success. l was studying sometimes 3 modules per term or 2 modules including dissertation. If you want a 12 months program, you must be prepared to sacrifice.


We at Robert Kennedy College are here to support you through the entire process and encourage you to get in touch with our team of Education Advisors and chat with them Live on WhatsApp if you have any questions about our programmes, fee structure, the application process, or details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

If you have already made up your mind and are ready to apply, then just click here.

DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Peter Cross

Sometimes, the fear of the unknown is more of a hindrance in achieving your end goal. Once you are past this fear and are well informed, it is just a matter of planning your path. Similar is the plight of students who want to study of online but face the fear of the unknown, such as : What is the best way to study online? Should you do an online programme? How to better manage time when learning online? And so on. 

These are all questions that we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get regularly asked by students looking to join one of our online programmes. Undertaking to do an online master’s degree programme will be an additional commitment to your time and finances, and it is wise to get information beforehand.

Through this continuing series of blog posts, some of our past and current students have shared their experiences, thoughts and opinions and given their feedback on handling some of these choices and situations. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

This time we have an alumnus from the York St John University and Robert Kennedy College, MBA Leadership Innovation and Change programme, Peter Cross. 

An Introduction

Which Uni are you studying with?

York St John University

Which programme did you choose and why?

MBA Leadership Innovation and Change

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I studied minimum twelve hours per week. I work better under pressure.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

During the week i.e Monday to Friday I devoted my lunchtime and evenings towards studies. Over the weekend, I generally studied most afternoons and evenings.

Photo credit: Canva.com

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

I had a systematic approach to each assignment and had objectives for the end week but always took advantage of the full time allotted. 

Travelling and Communication

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

I commute to work by train. I utilized my time commuting to and from work by train and it really helped early on in my studies.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

The forums were very useful and after the residency, a few of us joined an informal WhatsApp group and became friends outside of the course which continues even now.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Peers were a wonderful source of support. Professors also responded very timely to questions, whilst being the best at stimulating discussion on module’s relevant topics.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

Maybe read research papers during commute by train and arrive to office at 9 am. At lunchtime, I leave my desk and go to my favorite reading place in the office. I continue work in afternoon and return to my favorite reading place latest by 6pm for 1-2 hours to read. Then I travel back to home and relax for the evening.

At weekends, I relax with family in the morning. I continued research for at least five hours on Saturday and Sunday during the afternoon and in evening at my favorite reading place at home. I would usually take some time out to be with family.

I was ruthless sticking to this routine, even when we had visitors.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Having an environment to read comfortably and uninterrupted is crucial. Find your favorite space at home and around work where you can consistently slip away to study and so that people around you get used to you not being available to them.

Give yourself an opportunity to get into a constructive routine and ensure you love going to your favorite study place, perhaps taking a coffee with you. It makes the difference when studying difficult topics.

Photo credit: Canva.com

A to the point and practical advice by our alumni – go grab a cup of coffee (or tea)! I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and provided that motivational boost to your academic plans. You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer and the application process.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student

Through the #DILO series of blog posts, we have been bringing you insights into the life of our master’s students, sharing their thoughts and opinions, ups and downs, and key learning points during their online studies. The whole idea behind this series is to make you aware of the realities of online studies and help you in making a decision.

This week, we look at a day in the life of one of our MSc Human Resource Management and Development student. Let’s hear about his experience studying for an online master’s degree programme.

An Introduction

Which university are you studying with?

University of Salford (UoS)

Which programme did you choose and why?

MSHRD – the field that I am currently working.

Who you are, really?

A proud RKC student 🙂

The Study Plan

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How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

It was very hard planning to study as I have my own business and children. I panned two hours a day/ 3 days a week for studies. This time was not enough for me. Realistically, I should have put at least 10 hours every week for studies and research.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

Evenings and weekends.

How much time did you devote for each assignment?

Each assignment took me the time allotted. Simply put, I started on the research as soon as I received the topic. and sometimes, it seemed as if the three weeks was not enough.

Travelling and Communication

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How did travelling impact your ability to study?

I did not have to travel a lot so it did not impact me.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

It was difficult. In my situation, there were two classes where I met two other ladies that lived not very far from my house, so it was easy to have study sessions. In dealing with professors, I usually emailed with questions and always got a prompt response back. Studying online is always a challenge as the face to face is never there.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

In the morning it starts with work and maybe during the day, if not busy at work, will work on research for my paper and then in the evenings, will spend a couple of hours with my reading and then on weekends will work on my paper.

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies

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Start from day one. Don’t procrastinate as 3 weeks goes by very fast. The material is a lot of go over and then you have the work to do. Keep in touch with your professor and ask any questions you have for clarifications as you work on your assignments. Reach out to peers, as they can be helpful as well. Usually peers will create a WhatsApp group, be a part of it..it makes it seem as if you are in a classroom…as it can be very noisy. A great program. Goodluck and I wish you well.


If you are considering getting your master’s degree, now would be an excellent time to take the plunge. Look at our programme list and see if we have anything that could help.

I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for more similar blogs. You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and the discounts we might offer.

DILO (A day in the life of) of RKC master’s student

Through the #DILO series of blog posts we have been bringing you insights into the life of our master’s students, sharing their thoughts and opinions, ups and downs, and key learning points during their online studies. The whole idea behind this series is to make you aware of realities of online studies, and help you in decision making.  

This week we take a look at a day in the life of one of our excited MBA student, on the way to complete the MBA programme. Let’s hear his experience studying for Master’s of Business Administration:

An Introduction 

Which Uni are you studying with? 

University of Cumbria

Which programme did you choose and why? 

I chose the MBA programme. I wanted the fluidity of the degree to be able to strategically move upward within organizations.

The Study Plan 

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week? 

I followed the recommended guideline. I had some classmates who did the mandatory modules first, then took the modules that were aligned with their profession, but that would have prolonged the completion of the program.

There was a mandatory two hours daily schedule, sometimes, three to four hours depending on the subject. I would suggest however, to read through the course requirement at the beginning of the course to get an understanding of the requirement.

Begin early to draft the final assessment for the module and make revisions as the material becomes clearer.

Prepare a study plan and pick a time of the day that works best for you

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?) 

Morning hours and weekends were more practicable for me.

How much time did you devote for each assignment? 

I would say it depends on the subject. Familiar subjects were easier and more interesting, those that were challenging got extra attention. Roughly 3-4 days per assignment, inclusive of research, rough draft and then final submission.

Travelling and Communication 

How did travelling impact your ability to study? 

Initially, travelling impacted study times. It required major adjustment to after-work schedule and infringement on family time. It eventually came down to prioritizing what was important at that particular time.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences? 

The interaction with the different time zones was tricky. One had to keep in mind the time differences and make the adjustments.

A typical day as a master’s student 

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you? 

Getting up a little earlier to put in extra time, when it is quiet in the morning. Listening to podcast on related materials during breaks and the long drive home.

Any advice? 

Take advantage of every opportunity. Make a structured daily schedule that includes two hours of daily studies. Break it up if necessary. Most importantly during overwhelming and difficult periods… take a break.. take a deep breath… and start again.

Have a core group of people in the program that you can interact with, share and exchange information.

If you have been dreaming of joining a master’s programme or have had this personal goal to gain a higher education, now is the time! Take the valuable advice from our current students, gain from their experience, add your own unique study strategies, and make your own success stories!

Chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, application process, and for information on discounts we might be offering at this time. 

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student

Through the #DILO series of blog posts, we have been bringing you insights into the life of our master’s students, sharing their thoughts and opinions, ups and downs, and key learning points during their online studies. The whole idea behind this series is to make you aware of the realities of online studies and help you in making a decision.

This week, we look at a day in the life of one of our MSc students and a Supply Chain Officer by profession. Let’s hear about his experience studying for an online master’s degree programme.

An Introduction

Which university are you studying with?

University of Salford (UoS)

Which programme did you choose and why?

MSc in Procurement, Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Having been in supply chain management for well over 20 years, I felt that acquiring advanced qualifications would enhance my unique capabilities in supply chain management. My overall goal is to offer consulting services independently as a consultant or contractor.

Who you are, really?

I am a Supply Chain Officer (Procurement). My brief involves acquiring goods, works, services, consulting and non-consulting services for a project funded by the World Bank in the energy sector.

The Study Plan

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How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

By allocating at least three hours daily for each unit in the morning and after a day’s work, spending weekends studying and sometimes reading up to midnight to catch up with the tutorial offered by UoS and RKC. By adhering to my study schedule, it worked for me.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

Early mornings and an hour or two in the evening. On Saturday, I spent the whole day studying and on Sundays, half a day.

How much time did you devote for each assignment?

I devoted at least a week to full-time revision, drafting, and finalising the assignment of the work schedule.

Travelling and Communication

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How did travelling impact your ability to study?

Much of it is positive. However, there was one episode in which I was negatively impacted when, on an overseas travel, I experienced network problems and, unlucky, fell unwell for a whole week during the final submission time.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

Ensuring I respond to all posts and participate actively when I have time. Every time after work, I went through all posts and submitted my posts to any forum discussions.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

Extremely busy for me. However, the programme was very flexible, which helped with my tight work schedule.

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies

Image credit: canva.com

One has to have an interest in the studies. This is quite self-motivating and gives one the impetus to keep studying despite the challenges of a busy work schedule.


If you are considering getting your master’s degree, now would be an excellent time to take the plunge. Look at our programme list and see if we have anything that could help.

I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for more similar blogs. You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and the discounts we might offer.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s degree student

Continuing with our popular blog series that answers some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get asked frequently by students looking to join one of our online programmes, we asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

Image credit: canva.com

Let’s learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student!

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am an honest and compassionate woman juggling FT work, school, and mother of two amazing children, a wife and a caregiver to elderly ill parents.

Which programme did you choose and why?

MBA Leading Innovation and Change. Without effective leadership, no organisational goal will be reached. Without the ability to innovate and properly manage the change initiatives, organisations flatline and lack growth opportunities.

The Study Plan

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How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I created a schedule for daily obligations and free time. I used my free time to study and read what I needed to learn. I typically spend 2-3 hours Monday to Thursday, 3-4hrs Friday and 5-8hrs Saturday and Sunday. Every second weekend I take a Saturday off and enjoy a day with my family and friends for sanity 🙂

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

If you work during the weekdays and have children, then the evening is best. It’s dependent on other obligations in your life. But you have to schedule it and make it a habit. It eventually becomes routine if you have some discipline and focus on the end goal of achieving the MBA.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

In any given week, my minimum time towards assignments and studies is 20hrs.

Travelling and Communication

Image credit: canva.com

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

When I travelled, I took my laptop and some books. Luckily, everything is online so that you can study on the go.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors, given the time differences?

I used email and Teams with my professors and WhatsApp with my peers. Sometimes the times were extremely early morning or late in the evening, but it’s worthwhile.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online master’s student look like for you?

Come home from work, go to the gym, enjoy some family time, and then lock myself in my office and study. Most of my free time is devoted to my studies as a student.

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies

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Create a weekly schedule with all commitments and plan your studies. Explain to friends and family you are immersed for a couple of years in the goal of achieving an MBA. Ask for support and help when you need it. I know it will be difficult sometimes, but I have the discipline to persevere. Don’t hesitate to ask your professors for advice when you need some. Don’t give up. It’s a learning experience, and it’s truly worthwhile. You meet some incredible people on this journey. But YOU MUST SCHEDULE YOUR TIME! Priorities must be set as to what’s most important to you.


If you have been thinking about getting your master’s degree, and proving to yourself and others that you CAN do it, now would be an excellent time to take the plunge. Have a look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything that could help.

I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for more similar blogs. You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and the discounts we might offer.

#DILO – A day in the life of an RKC master’s student – June H

As a former Education advisor, if I had to pick one of the most frequently asked questions by prospective students, it would be “How many hours do I need to study?”  

The vast majority (if not all) of our students are working and leading hectic professional lives. Some are motivated and have already decided to undertake a master’s, while others contemplate the unknowns of an online programme. In my experience, two things affect their decision the most.   

First – finances, and second, being able to strike the perfect work, study, and life balance. While I cannot completely help you with the finances (partially yes – check out the discount offers currently being offered on our online MBA, MSc, and LL.M programmes), I thought what I could do to help was to bring some facts to light about the other unknowns – what does a typical day in the life of an online master’s student look like?  

Today, we’re looking at June’s typical study days. June, an RKC & University of Cumbria’s graduate, offered us these answers:  

An Introduction  

Which programme did you choose and why?  

I chose MBA programme as it matched my work experience and that is what I wanted to do after graduation.

The Study Plan   

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?  

Each Monday morning I would check the requirements for the modules I was registered into. I would then plan my week accordingly. I put in about 20 hours a week for each module, plus some extra time when completing the assignments, mid-term or final. Each week I tried to respond on the discussion board by Wednesday and then would respond to others on the discussion in the latter part of the week. Of course, sometimes life gets in the way, and I would have to put in more time one week, to make up for the time I missed due to other obligations.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

I work best in the morning, so this is my preferred time when possible. To study in the evening I would often go to the local library for a quieter atmosphere that at home.

To study in the evening June would often go to the local library for a quieter atmosphere that at home.

How much time did you devote for each assignment?  

Probably more than I should have! It depended on the amount of research that was needed for each assignment. On an average about 20 – 30 hours for mid-terms and 40 – 60 hours for finals, with the exception of the residency with the final assignment after returning – I’m guessing I spent closer to 120 hours on that final assignment.

Travelling and Communication  

Did you travel for work? How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

Studying would become difficult due to disparate bandwidth availability. Having said that, it was often an opportunity on the plane or between flights to study during quiet times.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

The five hour time difference between Ontario Canada and Switzerland was bit of a problem, especially trying to get assignments in on time.

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

Since I work best in the morning, I would get my coffee and start by checking the discussion boards and making note of what I needed to give a response for. I mapped out my reading for the week, and so would spend my allotted time doing the reading and listening to webcasts. By Wednesday each week, I would put my contribution to the discussion board.

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

Make a schedule early on to get the mid-term and final assignments completed.

Create files on your computer to keep your modules, assignments, and research organised so that when you are completing your assignments you can easily find your materials. I noticed that many students did not participate in the discussion boards, and I think they missed a valuable part of the learning. And potentially we missed out on their experience and perspective that they may have shared with the rest of the class.

 

June advises to create files on your computer to keep the modules, assignments, and research organised

All right, so this was a sneak peek of a typical day in  life as a master’s student. I hope you find it insightful and informative and that it gives you an idea of what to expect when you enrol for our master’s programmes. Watch this space as we have many more interesting insights coming up! 

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Kevin Young

This series has fast become one of our most appreciated blog posts. This “Day in the Life of” series focuses on the challenges and rewards our students derive from doing an online master’s degree with us, and we have been blessed with students who were more than happy to volunteer their time and share their experiences.

There is no better way to learn than from those who came before and see what worked for them. It will help you become a better student and help you make an informed decision.

An Introduction

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Who are you?

I am Kevin Young, a Robert Kennedy College (RKC) and York St John University (YSJ) MBA student.

Which programme did you choose and why?

MBA Management Consulting because after several years consulting in South East Asia & Australia, I decided to gain an MBA and set up my own consultancy business, which I am now in the process of doing.

The Study Plan

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How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I dedicated hours each week and knew the only way to get through this was to stick to a plan. A good timetable and study plan do help. Also, I would spend my lunch break doing some studying or reading relevant to the module.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

Sundays were my best study day. After early morning coffee, I would spend the whole day working on my modules.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

I started the assignments as I did my lessons, so they were in parallel – just to ensure I could keep up.

Travelling and Communication

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How did travelling impact your ability to study?

I would also do a bit of studying on a plane. A flight from Singapore to Brisbane is 8 hours – that’s a full-day study!

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

Online makes it easy because there is no time zone relevant to working on the modules. For the dissertation, my supervisor was in the UK, and I was in Australia, so it was 9:00 am for him and 6 or 7 pm for me to connect – no issue, and it worked really well.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online master’s student look like for you?

Luckily, I could sometime sneak a bit of studying into my working day, especially at lunchtime. At the end of the workday, I would go home and spend four or more hours in the evening. I would often have Saturday free with the family and then get stuck on Sundays. Saturday was a fallback day if I was getting behind.

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

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Have a study plan and stick to it – almost project manage your time! Don’t try to do two modules together; just concentrate on each one at a time. Use the class chats to query things or get advice. Above all – enjoy the learning! I was lucky in that I was passionate about the subjects in the module.


We at Robert Kennedy College are here to support you through the entire process and encourage you to get in touch with our team of Education Advisors and chat with them Live on WhatsApp if you have any questions about our programmes, fee structure, the application process, or details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

If you have already made up your mind and are ready to apply, then just click here.

Dr. Wambaka Kosea – A LL.M International Commercial Law graduate and MSc. International Events Management student – says Education is an investment

Our students come from different walks of life. Robert Kennedy College (RKC) takes pride in being a truly international college, with over 7000 students from 140 countries. Our 100% online programmes have been designed for busy managers. Our students and alums work for many international organisations and top companies from all over the world. 

Allow me to introduce one of the RKC’s proud students, Dr. Wambaka Kosea, sharing few insights and some words of wisdom from his own experience. 

There is no better way to learn than from those who came before and see what learning strategies worked for them. It will help you become a better student and, hopefully, help you make an informed decision.

We asked Dr. Kosea few questions and we got some truly inspiring answers

Brief introduction about yourself, background, education and work experience

My Name is Wambaka Kosea, aged 46 years, born to Kosea Makwasi and Rovanance Nandudu in the District of Sironko in Uganda.

I studied at Bugwagi Primary School from Primary One to Primary Five and then went to Buyobo Primary School for Primary Six and Seven. I then joined Masaba Secondary School for Ordinary and Advance level, from where I passed and was admitted to Makerere University to pursue a Bachelor’s Degree in Education (Economics and Geography). In 2002, I applied and was admitted at the School of Economics of Makerere University to pursue a Master’s Degree in Economic Policy and Planning. In 2008 I enrolled for a PhD in Economics at Makerere University and then enrolled for other academic qualifications and professional skills training. I now hold a PhD in Management as well (Project Management) from the University of Central Nicaragua, a Master’s Degree in International Commercial Law From the University of Salford in conjunction with Robert Kennedy College Zurich, a Master’s in Business Administration from East and Southern African Management Institute, Arush Tanzania and a candidate for a Masters in International Events Management at the University of Salford In conjunction with Robert Kennedy College Zurich. 

I have also attained the following professional development and or academic certificates.

  1. Professional Development Certificate in Negotiation (Dealing with Difficult People and Problems) from Harvard Law School, Harvard University USA.
  2. Professional Development Certificate in Intensive Leadership Excellence from the University of California (Berkeley Extension), Californian, USA.
  3.  Certificate in International Labour Migration: Economics, Politics and Ethics, from the University of Oxford UK
  4. Professional Development Certificate/Banking Game/Financial Boot Camp, finance and banking in Europe from Frankfurt School of Financial Management, Frankfurt, Germany
  5. Professional Development Certificate in International Taxation on Oil and Gas and Other Mining Activities from IBFD (International Tax Academy) Singapore.
  6. Professional Development Certificate in International Tax Aspects of Corporate Tax planning from IBFD Moscow, Russia.
  7. Professional Development Certificate in Energy and Mining Law from Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
  8. Professional Development Certificate in International Organisations Management from the University of Geneva Switzerland.
  9. Certificate in Climate Change: The Science from the University of British Columbia, Canada.
  10. Certificate in Global Diplomacy: The United Nations from the University of London and  SOAS University of London, UK 
  11. Professional Development Certificate in Analytical System Thinking from Enterprise University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
  12. Post Graduate Certificate in Project Planning and Management from Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
  13. Post Graduate Certificate in Monitoring and Evaluation from Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
  14. Certificate in Human Resource Management; from the Institute of Adult and Continuing Education, Makerere University
  15. Certificate in Strategic Procurement and logistics management; from the Institute of Adult and Continuing Education, Makerere University
  16. Professional Development Certificate in Strategic Management from East and Southern African Management Institute, Arusha, Tanzania. A high-profile management course that involved strategic thinking and long-term planning training for Big National and International Organizations, including comprehensive and coherent means of sustainable impact monitoring and evaluation.
  17. Professional Development Certificate in Wetland and Poverty Reduction Project, from Wetlands International, with four major thematic modules, namely;-Wetlands and Water Resource Management, Wetland Valuation, Policy Setting and Advocacy, and Financial Mechanisms
  18. Professional Development Certificate in Trade and Trade Policy from Uganda Programme on Trade Opportunities and Policy with the European Union. A course that involved training in Regional integration and agreements in Africa (opportunities and challenges facing COMESA), the Hong Kong Ministerial conference and beyond, Aid for Trade, the Doha Work Program (lessons, challenges and the way forward), Mult-lateral trade systems (focusing on ACP-EU) trade relations, National Trade Policy for Uganda and dispute settlement in international.

It should be noted that apart from the Bachelor’s Degree in Education, which the Government sponsored me, the costs of all other remaining courses have been met myself.

Dr. Wambaka Kosea being accompanied by Wife, Doctors and Professors  of Makerere University towards the celebration of his academic achievements at Sheraton Kampala Hotel on the 10th of February 2023.
Dr. Wambaka Kosea giving a speech at the celebration of his academic achievements at Sheraton Kampala Hotel on the 10th of February 2023.
Dr. Wambaka Kosea with the Rector of University of Central Nicaragua during the graduation of a PhD in Management.

Employment

I taught Economics for two years at St Lawrence Citizens High School from 2000 to 2002. I worked as a part-time consultant for the Uganda Programme on Trade Opportunities and Policy (UPTOP), funded by the Government of Uganda and the European Union as mainly an evaluator of trade research proposals for funding.

Currently I am the Group chairman of Strategic Group of companies (Strategic Friends International, incorporated in Uganda, Washington DC and Hong Kong, Strategic African Bidder Limited, Strategic Sustainable Development Fund Limited, Strategic Luxuries Transport Company Limited, Big Push Construction Limited, Events De Strategic Limited, Soft Services Development Forex Bureau Limited and HEM Cash Limited).

Dr. Wambaka Kosea at his work station at Strategic Friends International at Nakawa House, Nakawa Business Centre Kampala.

When did you decide to enrol for a Master’s with RKC?

I enrolled for a Master’s with RKC in 2018

What factors led you to pursue a Master’s degree at RKC?

The kind of work I am involved in cuts across borders and therefore requires that I understand issues to do with international commercial law. For international recognition and competitive purposes, I must attain it from a world reputable University or College at affordable costs and friendly payment terms. I also knew the skills and or qualifications needed to achieve my life goals and wanted an institution that could offer those skills.RKC and the University of Salford offers the needed courses and have merited in credibility and international recognition and also offers the courses within my financial confines and work schedule.

How much did you devote to studying online and submitting assignments?

The modules had specific timelines for study and assignment submissions. I spared time outside my work schedule to adhere to program timelines

Did you attend the on-campus residency program? What are your views about the residency?

Yes, I attended the on-campus residence program at Robert Kennedy in Zurich from Monday, June 17th to Friday, June 21st 2019. The residency program created an opportunity for the student to physically interact and learn from each other and also interact with the professors. It created room for the exchange of ideas and physical learning from the instructors with immediate responses since questions were put to professors and responses provided there and then. The group case studies built confidence among students to make presentations to other students from different backgrounds, and that was carried beyond residency. Interaction after class was not limited to only academics but also in other areas, such as culture and business opportunities in different countries of participants. It also created an opportunity for students to tour Switzerland and learn many things. Students created friendships that existed beyond Zurich. Residency as it sounds should be physical.  

How long did it take you to complete the program?

It took me a record time of one year.

In your opinion, how has the Master’s degree from RKC benefited you personally and professionally?

The master’s from RKC has benefited me personally and professionally, as delineated hereunder:

I now understand the current world legal regimes (Laws, Policy and Regulations) and their applicability to my work. I am therefore positioned to execute international trade activities and consultancies from a technically informed point of view with either none or minimal mistakes. I am among the few resource person to offer technical guidance and consultancies in areas of international arbitrations in Africa. The master’s program also groomed me and ushered me into conducting research privately and make applicable deductions and recommendation that can be used to better policies and programs. It should be noted that all assignments involved writing reports on certain problems or issues within the jurisdiction of the course which required one to conduct research. My confidence in the masters’ programs of the college can be certified by my enrollment for the second master’s in International Events Management.    

 Dr. Wambaka Kosea giving a keynote speech at the launch of the National Career Guidance Day at Kololo Independent ground on the 20th of March 2023 and sponsored by among others Strategic Friends International.

How was your experience with fellow students, professors and quality of education received?

Much as the course was done with limited physical interaction with other students and professors apart from the mandatory residency where we had a chance to physically interact, it was, however, organized in such a way that some assignments were done in groups that enabled us to learn from the experience and strength of other students from other parts of the world. The group discussions worked a great deal and eased understanding with the guidance of professors. The physical interaction at the mandatory residence at Robert Kennedy College in Zurich sealed the program learning process. 

The quality of education grooms the student to independently identify problems and provide solutions from a technically informed point of view. The method of assessment is compressive, transparent and aims at cultivating the level of understanding of the student in a particular subject matter. The fee payment structure is democratic in that it gives room for students to decide on a schedule that is convenient for them. Communication and feedback during the study process are timely, and the online library is available and well-equipped. Personally, my experience did not only stop at academics but also created sustainable friendships that have actually opened business opportunities with companies that employ some of the students I studied with.   

Inspiration Statement 

Unless economics has changed but what I know is that education is an investment, and just like any other investment, it is associated with a number of risks and the bigger the investment in education, the bigger the risk and the bigger the risk, the bigger the profit. The level-one positions themselves will determine their readiness to handle challenges and reap the opportunities offered by the world. Anyone can do business and succeed, but sustainable businesses that exist beyond one’s lifetime are uncured to professionalism and training. 

Education has its own time and must be attained within a specific timeline if one is to use the skills attained to make contributions, and global contribution requires that one understands global problems meaning that the kind and magnitude of contribution will depend on the level of exposure to global problems within the right timelines. 

I am driven by the fact that those who have made significant contributions on earth are human, and therefore a statement like “if they did it, I could also do it, and my personality is my unique gift” properly describes me.

A truly inspirational and motivating life story Dr. Wambaka Kosea, driving success in his career. I am sure you feel inspired enough to take that plunge of investing in education, investing in your future, investing in yourself!

We at Robert Kennedy College are here to support you through the entire process and encourage you to get in touch with our team of Education Advisors and chat with them Live on WhatsApp if you have any questions about our programmes, fee structure, the application process, or details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

If you have already made up your mind and are ready to apply, then just click here.

#DILO (A day in the life of) of RKC master’s student

Through the #DILO series of blog posts we have been bringing you insights into the life of our master’s students, sharing their thoughts and opinions, ups and downs, and key learning points during their online studies. The whole idea behind this series is to make you aware of realities of online studies, and help you in decision making.  

This week we take a look at a day in the life of one of our MBA students, a pilot by profession and the one who addresses himself as a ‘transformation agent’. Let’s hear his experience studying for Master’s of Business Administration:

An Introduction 

Which Uni are you studying with? 

York St John University (UK) 

I chose the MBA in Leading innovation and change offered in exclusive partnership with York St John University

Which programme did you choose and why? 

I chose the MBA in Leading innovation and change : change is constant and without innovation, one can be knocked out or overran by change! 

The Study Plan 

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week? 

To be honest, it was like an adhoc system in the beginning..

Moreover, change of company, country and crazy flight schedules including night flights meant I had to search for what would work for me.

Prepare a study plan and pick a time of the day that works best for you

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?) 

Given the unique work requirements, studying early mornings or late nights had been virtually impossible owing to early flights or night flights.

Then I discovered I could do study while in cruise!

Long flights with extended periods in cruise became an interesting option…

How much time did you devote for each assignment? 

I usually could not set for myself a fixed time..often it was the fatigue levels from day and night flights that determined how productive I could be. It was chaos because I had flight exams at the new company that also had really demanding pass rates…(80%). Only the last of the four modules worked better after the work related chaos subsided.

Dr. Radu had a chat with me after failing the first module marginally. I had thought that balancing this chaos was stretching my capacities beyond the minimum required to pass. I had intended to put a stop to studies till a better time emerged. But, I am glad that I had the talk with Dr. Radu Negoescu…I kept going and never looked back.

Travelling and Communication 

How did travelling impact your ability to study? 

Travel brought more chaos into the works. I worked hard to bring order to it.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences? 

I communicated through WhatsApp! Fantastic…it can be lonely but when a group is available, fellow students share their challenges and give each other support.

A typical day as a master’s student 

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you? 

For a pilot, no day is typical. Cruising to different destinations means having to alternate study times when freshness is at its peak for maximum concentration. However during difficult times, I had to take a minimum an hour daily to either read or do a write up.

For the dissertation though, 100 words for 100 days was the least allowable minimums…instead of waiting until last days owing to the scope and research involved.

Any advice? 

There is no fixed working system. Everything is relative to one thing: one’s level of discipline!

If you have been dreaming of joining a master’s programme or have had this personal goal to gain a higher education, now is the time! Take the valuable advice from our current students, gain from their experience, add your own unique study strategies, and make your own success stories! I would love to feature you one day on our college blog. 

Chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, application process, and for information on discounts we might be offering at this time.