#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Peter Spratling

This series has fast become one of our most appreciated blog posts. This “day in the life of” series focuses on the challenges and rewards our students derive from doing an online master’s degree with us, and we have been blessed with students who were more than happy to volunteer their time and share their experiences.

There is no better way to learn than from those who came before and see if what worked for them. It will help you become a better student and, hopefully, help you make an informed decision.

An Introduction

Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash.

Who are you?

I am Peter Spratling, a Robert Kennedy College (RKC) and University of Salford (UoS) MSc student.

Which programme did you choose and why?

MSc in Human Resource Management and Development alumni to support me in a Head of (International) School position.

The Study Plan

Photo by Jessica Lewis on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I planned to have time during my last year of headship at my last international school as things were established and running well. Then COVID-19 happened! I can’t count the hours, and there are many late nights as I have a 5-year-old daughter, and she’s important too 🙂

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

Late nights as I have a 5-year-old daughter, and she’s important too 🙂 Weekends too. I feel guilty sometimes escaping from swimming etc.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

It’s really hard to answer this, but every night reading material, discounting some, using other sources, moving from using books to recent, or more recent Google Scholar articles (thanks to Dr. H :))

Travelling and Communication

Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash.

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

I have not travelled, except for personal reasons, to the UK to see my parents.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

Easily using the UoS/RKC blogs and forums. The professors have been absolutely great. Supportive, understanding, and appropriately challenging at times 🙂 That includes Dr. Costa as Principal.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online master’s student look like for you?

Long but enjoyable and rewarding. Starts at 06:00 am and ends at midnight. That’s partly due to my role as a dad and headteacher.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Yes. The tutors, the professors, doctors, and librarians are all there to help us. They are approachable, as I found at times of stress, particularly during COVID-19, they made all the difference. Use Google Scholar or similar, Dr. Susan Harwood does a great workshop on this. Start early and get involved with the forums, they will help you in your essay writing.


We at Robert Kennedy College are here to support you through the entire process and encourage you to get in touch with our team of Education Advisors and chat with them Live on WhatsApp if you have any questions about our programmes, fee structure, the application process, or details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

If you have already made up your mind and are ready to apply, then just click here.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Khuong Ho Thi Uyen

Continuing with our popular blog series that answers some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get asked frequently by students looking to join one of our online programmes, we asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

Let’s learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student!

An Introduction

Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash.

Who are you?

My name is Khuong Ho Thi Uyen, a Robert Kennedy College and University of Cumbria MBA student.

Which programme did you choose and why?

I am working in the healthcare industry – medical devices as a leader. Therefore, specialized knowledge is needed. That was why I chose the International Healthcare Management course.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

Before the module, I just planned to dedicate the two days of the weekend so that I could save four days per month for learning. However, the reality was messy! My classmates were active in the class forum discussion right after the professor posted the learning theory for each objective and the critical discussion areas. Many responses and comments from classmates were posted every day, including the individual analysis of the learning theory plus sharing their work experiences, all creating a proactive class forum. Therefore, I had to change my plan and re-arrange my life and include every night after work and any free time, if possible, to keep up with the class momentum.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

Early mornings, in the evenings after work, and at weekends.

Make sure you are ready with a schedule to maximise your study time. Photo by Aron Visuals on Unsplash.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

Usually, at the beginning of each new module, I read through the overall module components, obtained an outlook on how many units per module and, which topic per unit, what was the assignment requirement to think about during the module time. Looking for an assignment topic was important and required more time consumed. Coming to the module’s assignment, I devoted at least a month to completing it.

Travelling and Communication

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

In fact, travelling had a positive impact on my studies. I utilized the waiting time at the airport and the flight time while in the aeroplane to read books, paper, and cases and think about that. Travel helped me refresh my knowledge and gave me the time to consider the subject from different angles, which enabled me to come up with more new ideas and deeply understand the discussion objective.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

It did not matter if we were in a different time zone from each other. We were able to connect directly in the class discussion forums. There was a window for you to leave any message you would like to ask the professor; you were also able to recognize who was online at the same time you were online so that you could connect them via module forum or by email easily as each classmate and professor also had an email which was told to us. Thanks to technology, I experienced that my classmates were prompt in their responses despite being in different time zones. Besides, at the beginning of each module, there was an introduction session, and via that, we set up another class group chat like on WhatsApp.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online master’s student look like for you?

It becomes a routine and feels normal to me!

Any advice?

Photo by Medienstürmer on Unsplash.

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

  1. Order recommended books for each module: Whether you plan to purchase a hardcopy or soft copy book, you should well plan this. Make sure you have the book ready with you before the module’s starting time so that you can refer to the books. This will facilitate your learning.
  2. Prepare your finances to pay for school fees on time and to purchase online books (if required).
  3. Time dedicated to the study is significant. You should plan it in advance and follow it strictly. With a scheduled study plan, you will know what to expect.
  4. All of your classmate’s comments and discussions in each module forum will add value to your learnings.
  5. Please do not hesitate to ask or comment or share. The more you ask, comment, and share, the more you are valued by the professor and your classmates.
  6. Read more: including recommended books, papers, and discussions. These are valuable sources for your study. 

Thank you, and enjoy your learning!


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

6 ways to manage your time better!

For some of us, there are never enough hours in a day. No matter what we do, we just don’t seem to be able to do all that we intend to do before the end of the day. We just end up overworking (what I mean by “work” here is not only related to our jobs but to all the tasks we need to get done during the day), taking away more from the “me” time.

Get more done by managing your time better. Photo by Kevin Ku on Unsplash.

But the fact is, for most of us, the main reason we don’t have enough time to complete everything we have to get done, is that we tend to simply over-think or don’t know how to make a plan and then stick to it or we simply procrastinate.

In fact, one of the reasons why more and more people are choosing to study online is because they don’t have the time to do a full-time or on-campus executive programme and an online programme help in managing time better by freeing up time.

The following are six ways to help you manage your time better. Hopefully, incorporating some of these tips in your life will not only help you manage your student life better but also improve your work-life balance.

(1) Try not to multitask!

Most of us think we are capable of multitasking. But the fact is 97.5% of us are incapable of multitasking, and when we hear this fact, most of us think we fall into that 2.5% capable of multitasking. So, let’s be realistic and assume we are incapable of multitasking and focusing on completing just one task at a time. You will find that your brain will be less tired when focusing on just one task, and you will be able to complete the task effectively and efficiently.

(2) Schedule Everything!

I have no idea how many times I have mentioned this point, but the key to managing time better is planning your day, your week, your month and broadly, even your year (wait, doesn’t this sound like part of a song?). People who use a calendar know how useful it can be to increase efficiency. The organiser/calendar is a tool that can be far more useful than reminding you of your next meeting. Create a calendar that contains every minutia of your daily activities for the week/month/quarter (however long you can go), from household chores to study/work deadlines. Then populate the calendar with your family’s schedule; this will give you a good idea of your schedule, inform you when to expect distractions from your family, and help you plan for it.

(3) Separate the logical from the creative

It is said that the human brain is divided into two halves – the creative side and the logical side. If we are engaged in a logic related activity, immediately shifting to a creative activity will cause us to stutter and stall. So, when you plan your day or week, make sure there is a clear divide between the two activities to give your brain the time to reorient itself. So, maybe logical mornings and creative afternoons?

(4) Stacking tasks

This point is a logical follow-up to the previous point. Stack similar tasks together. It sounds so logical and straightforward; if you have to do similar or continual tasks, then by stacking them together, you will increase your work efficiency and save time. Check your calendar and let me know how much stacking you have done?

(5) Just let go and be free

Photo by Samuel Regan-Asante on Unsplash.

It is never a good idea to revel in the glories of the past or wallow in the miseries of failure. If you have had success, celebrate it and then move on to your next assignment or challenge. If you have failed, then you have failed – analyse it, learn from it, and move on. Don’t get stuck in the past, you will just end up wasting time.

(6) Have a Goal

Goals give you something to work towards. How does this help you in managing time better? Well, all the other points I mentioned here will become moot if you don’t have anything you are working towards. All your planning, achievements and work ethics goes out of the window if you don’t have a goal you are working towards. So, if you don’t have a goal, then what is the point of even reading this blog? You have already achieved everything in life.


These points are just six simple tips to help you manage time better. I would appreciate it if you would share your tips on time management. What has worked best for you?

If you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree, and are ready to challenge yourself, look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Paul

Continuing our a day in the life of RKC student series, we asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. 

There is no better way but to learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student! Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision..

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am Paul M.

Which programme did you choose and why?

The MBA programme. The MBA obviously has the essential business basics, that improves our ability as leaders with contemporaneous knowledge of current best practices combined with reiteration of essential skills which every leader should know. I chose RKC because of the convenience of an online degree and the fact that it partnered with quality UK universities.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

Robert Burns’ poem To a Mouse, (1786) includes the line “the best made plans of mice and men” which is interpreted that even the best made plans will go wrong…and they did. I set aside time each evening for course reading and the online availability made it easy when traveling. Over weekends, I was locked down on Sunday evenings until midnight, regardless. Each week required at least 12 -20 hours of study time to see any progress.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

Evenings and the occasional early morning.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?  

Each class has different requirements, so this is tough to quantify. In average each assignment (Paper/ report) requires around 40 hours of self directed study and another 20 in terms of prep and writing the paper. The dissertation is a whole different time management project and requires STRUCTURE, if you cannot be structured and meet / set deadlines this will be a challenge.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Travelling and Communication  

How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

If there was internet, I was on the site!

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

Some direct messaging and interactions mostly on the forums. It was much more due to COVID.

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

FIRST THING 1) Check forum posts

2) Check for any updates on syllabus and deadlines 3) Plan any activity for the day 4) Regular work day 5) Study one to two hours and engage on forum.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

Have a plan and work the plan. If you fail, reset and get back on the plan, learn to adapt to the challenges that life sends you. Above all have fun the end result is worth it.

I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and answers to any questions you may have.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Tahera Sultana

Continuing with our series of blogs that answer some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get asked frequently by students looking to join one of our online programmes. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

Let’s learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student!

Be disciplined and prepared to devote time and energy to the course.

Tahera Sultana

An Introduction

Photo by Vladislav Klapin on Unsplash.

Who are you?

Hi, my name is Tahera Sultana (it means pure). I am female, married with no children. I am also a Compliance Officer and have worked for different financial institutions for more than 20 years.

Which programme did you choose and why?

I am studying the Master of Laws (LLM) programme. I have been working in the compliance field for over twenty years, and I find more of my colleagues and subordinates are law graduates. I thought to myself, if I pursue a law degree, I could enhance my knowledge grow beyond being a Compliance Officer.

The Study Plan

Photo by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I am a full-time employee and a part-time student. Before starting a module, I will understand the module requirement that I am about to enrol. Each week, I print out all presentation material and listen to the recorded lecture; I make my notes and review the lecture a few times until I can digest the topic. I spent approximately one hour per week on lectures and 2-3 hours reading time for the required chapter in the module.

I spent most of the time working on my given assignment. The research process takes up to 10 hours. After reading the related material, I will start writing the paper. As I have done three modules so far in the programme, writing time takes up to 5-6 hours per 1,000 words. As a full-time employee, I work on my assignment in the evening and during the weekend. Assignment time is not an easy task for me, but a very fruitful experience. I enjoy writing on meaningful and interesting topics.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

I had no choice in choosing my study time. For me, after work is the most suitable time to study. If I had a choice, I would have chosen early mornings to do my studies. For the most part, weekends are not good for me because I work from Monday to Friday, from 9:00 am to 7:30 pm (normal office hours is 9 to 6, but in Hong Kong, we have unofficial long working hours). Over the weekend, I go hiking and spend time with my family. If I have to complete an assignment, I will work extra hours during the week to meet the deadline. I will also skip hiking and family time to achieve the goal.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

Every 1000 words will take me approximately 5-6 hours of writing time. I devote approximately 20 to 22 hours to each assignment (excluding research & reading material).

Travelling and Communication

The challenges of learning while travelling. Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash.

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

I find it very hard to study if I have to travel. I may skip one weeks’ lecture and catch up in the coming weeks, i.e., after my business travel. If I have to submit an assignment during my travel, I carry all my research material onto the aircraft and work during the flight. I remember, it was late Jan 2020, I had to fly from Hong Kong to London; I worked 10 hours on the flight. Fortunately, I had three hours of sleep during that trip.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

Interacting with peers and professors is no big deal in these modules. We have once or twice zoom / Blue Jean meetings in each module. I am not concerned about the time difference, as I am in Asia; 3:00 pm London/Swiss time is 9:00 pm Hong Kong time. That suits me, for I can join after office hours. However, when I am travelling, there will be a problem with the change in the time difference, and I might end up missing the meeting. At one time I remember I used my computer in the hotel during my business trip to interact with the whole class; I could not hear clearly what they were discussing due to hotel Wi-Fi.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

I find myself glad that there is an online course that I can take advantage of. I can still work as a full-time employee and study during my off-hours, although it is not an easy task when there is travelling involved. I take pride in my decision to gain a Master’s degree; I understand that hard work is needed, and I know this will help me progress and enhance to the next level.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Be disciplined and prepared to devote time and energy to the course. Know that all classmates are your partners, and the professors are very experienced and are there to help you succeed. I am glad that I made a good choice to achieve my Master’s degree.


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and for details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

Nutrition and Academic Performance

Dis-moi ce que tu manges, je te dirai ce que tu es.”
[Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are].

Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

You might be wonder why I am writing about food today and what is its impact on studying the master’s programme and academic performance. It is a widely believed fact that you are what you eat. Studies have shown that the food that we eat has a bearing on our academic performance. Hence the direct correlation between nutrition and academic performance.

When I was a young kid, my mother always insisted on eating healthy food and wanted my brother and me to develop healthy eating habits. But we loved what every other kid adores – junk food. I preferred eating French fries over broccoli any day; little did we understand the effect of food on our bodies and mental health. Nor did I realise that not eating a balanced diet could lead to several deficiencies in the body, such as iron deficiency, vitamins, iodine, and zinc. These deficiencies can negatively impact cognition, intuition, perception and, mental concentration. 

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

According to WHO, nutrition is an essential element of the health and development of human life. Food plays a vital role in physical and mental development, productivity, and performance. Food is fuel for our body and mind. Eating right early in life yields benefits in the later stages of life as we grow older. It becomes even more critical as an adult to maintain good eating habits and consume nutritional food as there are many roles and responsibilities one caters to in everyday life. From being a parent, to being a business owner, working for a corporation or being a mature student, one will wear many hats. You can take care of others only when you yourself are healthy and in good health. Studying for a master’s is a challenge while balancing study, work and life. 

Here are 3 ways how nutrition effects academic performance:

Cognitive development

Good nutritional food brings satisfaction to the body. With a satisfied body and mind one can have better concentration and self-actualization. If there is no fuel provided to the body, the mind becomes sluggish too and there is a lag in the need to excel in studies. Hence good nutrition is necessary for the optimum realisation of one’s cognitive and economic potential. 

Good nutrition is necessary for the optimum realisation of one’s cognitive and economic potential. Photo Credit: Canva.com

Better learning potential

Healthy mind stays in a healthy body. Our brain’s potential is much more than we actually utilise it. Providing adequate nutrition and rather enhancing our diet with super foods improves mental learning performance manyfold. The spontaneity of student and concentration is much better when they are well nourished. This is turn improves the learning potential. 

Build immunity and prevent illnesses

Our cells produce energy required for all our daily tasks and also for additional un-anticipated events. Last few years have been very challenging with Covid-19 spreading all over the world and only fittest could survive. Good nutrition will ensure your body has built adequate immunity to fight all the unprecedented diseases and illnesses. And when the body is illness free, the mind can excel in academic performance. 

Photo credit: Canva.com

Good food, balance diet and exercise is the mantra for healthy living and excelling your academic performance. Also check out our blog on how exercise can make you a better student.

Chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the 100% online master’s degree programmes we offer and the application process. 

#Dilo – A day in the life of an RKC student – Wilson K

As a former Education advisor, if I had to pick one of the most frequently asked questions by prospective students, it would be “How many hours do I need to study?”  

The vast majority (if not all) of our students are working and leading hectic professional lives. Some are motivated and have already decided to undertake a master’s, while others contemplate the unknowns of an online programme. In my experience, two things affect their decision the most.   

First – finances, and second, being able to strike the perfect work, study, and life balance. While I cannot completely help you with the finances (partially yes – check out the discount offers currently being offered on our online MBA, MSc, and LL.M programmes), I thought what I could do to help was to bring some facts to light about the other unknowns – what does a typical day in the life of an online master’s student look like?  

I asked a few of our students from different walks of life, occupations, and personal situations to answer a few questions on their study tactics and strategies, plans and reality, and so on.  So, through our ‘#DILO ‘a typical day in the life of a master’s student’ blog series every month, we bring to you one of our actual students or alumni sharing the insights.   

Today, we’re looking at Wilson’s typical study days. Wilson, the Managing Director of an advertising company in Kenya for the past 14 years, offered us these answers:

An Introduction  

Vidhi Kapoor (VK): Which programme did you choose and why?  

Wilson K (WK): I chose an MBA programme in International Business in order to boost my wealth of knowledge for conducting business through a wider lens that could help me steer the company and any new initiatives to greater heights from an informed foundation.

A person writing on a piece of paper

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Stayed focused and consistent

The Study Plan   

VK : How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?  

WK:  While the modules are structured with the ease of flexibility, the fundamental aspect is that each revolves around the individual’s ability to keep the pace as a member of a group class. And this means serious balancing between work expectations and deadlines, not to mention that you must also research and study to reflect the mind of a master’s student. My strategy was to allocate the first 2 hours on Monday, 2 hours Wednesday morning and at least 3 hours on Friday to catch up with the reading and contribute to class work and assignments as well. 

VK: What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

WK: I found morning hours very apt especially if the assigned time implied adjusting your wake-up schedule and morning routine. The mind is less polluted and cluttered with the day’s requirement and one is able not only to concentrate but also bring out the best in terms of thinking and concentration.

A clock on a table

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Wilson allocated time based upon the requirements of each assignment

VK: How much time did you devote for each assignment?  

WK: Time devotion for each assignment was dictated by the requirements and details of the questions. In most cases, each weekly assignment needed about 4 hours, but the examinations required at least 4 days considering that one is given the benefit of knowing each paper in advance.

Travelling and Communication  

VK: Did you travel for work? How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

DA:  My work involves a lot of travel around the country but whenever such need arose, I had to plan for a trade-off in terms of hours where either delegation or relegation of priorities had to be effected. Missed classwork and deadlines sounded like the best recipe for failing a module and facing the menacing consequences that are well defined within the rules.

VK: How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

WK: With proper planning and calculated awareness of time differences, I really can’t say I had a problem interacting with peers. The University timetable was also well aligned to this as both the classwork and assignment deadlines did not create overly demanding adjustments.

A typical day as a master’s student  

VK: What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

WK: A typical day comes with lots of anxiety on not only how well you are faring in class but your preparedness towards the assessments. You also have to keep check of your performance within the organisation especially if you are a leader so that you do not jeopardize the organization you guide.

Any advice?  

VK:Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

WK: This programme demands individual discipline especially on time management. The risk of just skimming through the course is real and the most important thing to keep at the back of the head is that this should not just be for passing the exams and getting an award but to ensure that you obtain the incredible insights that propels your line of thought, intelligence, and faculties higher than where you are today.

   

A person working on a computer

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Wilson says the programme aims forthe incredible insights that propels your line of thought, intelligence, and faculties higher than where you are today.

Alright friends, this was a sneak peek of a typical day in Wilson’s life as a master’s student. I hope you find it insightful and informative and that it gives you an idea of what to expect when you enrol for our master’s programmes. Watch this space as we have many more interesting insights coming up! 

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Premprakash

Sometimes, the fear of the unknown is more of a hindrance in achieving your end goal. Once you are past this fear and are well informed, it is just a matter of planning your path. Similar is the plight of students who want to study of online but face the fear of the unknown, such as : What is the best way to study online? Should you do an online programme? How to better manage time when learning online? And so on. 

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

These are all questions that we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get regularly asked by students looking to join one of our online programmes. Undertaking to do an online master’s degree programme will be an additional commitment to your time and finances, and it is wise to get information beforehand.

Through this continuing series of blog posts, some of our past and current students have shared their experiences, thoughts and opinions and given their feedback on handling some of these choices and situations. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

This time we have an alumnus from the University of Cumbria and Robert Kennedy College, MBA Leadership & Sustainability programme, Premprakash. 

An Introduction

Which Uni are you studying with?

University of Cumbria

Which programme did you choose and why?

MBA Leadership & Sustainability

The Study Plan

A hand holding a phone

Description automatically generated with low confidencePhoto by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

Minimum of six hours daily. I work better under pressure. The two modules that I enjoyed the most were IMS (Information Management) and Marketing Management. I did them together, and it turned out to be two distinctions! IMS Professor Radu was someone I really liked. His reply to the forums and interims was why I achieved high marks in IMS.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

After midnight through to early mornings all week plus the weekends.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

For the interim assignment I spent one week and, for final assessments about two weeks’ time. I completed my dissertation within the 6-month minimum period. 

Travelling and Communication

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

The Online residency was a lifesaver as Covid19 disrupted travel to the UK. 

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

The time difference did not pose any problems for me.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

Studying keeps me happy, focused, and desiring more knowledge.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Never give up!!!

A to the point and practical advice by our alumni. I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and provided that motivational boost to your academic plans..You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer and the application process.

5 ways to get over E-Learning Fatigue

There is no denying that the coronavirus has hugely impacted our lives. For the most part, the impact on our lives have been negative, and, in some cases, it has even been tragic. And it does not seem there is any end at sight.

Photo by Fusion Medical Animation on Unsplash.

But not everything has been negative; there are a few silver linings. We have been forced to streamline and automate our processes and expedite our evolution to the cloud with increased online transactions. Even the way we learn has evolved.

Online learning has been around for several years now; we, Robert Kennedy College (RKC), have been around since 1998. While there are many benefits to online education, I recommend it to work/business professionals looking to earn a master’s degree/add subject knowledge, etc., while continuing to work. But we will soon have a whole generation of new workers who have only ever known online education or whose entire career has been mainly online.

For those of us who spend all day working in front of a computer and are simultaneously doing an online degree programme, e-learning fatigue is real. The sooner we identify the symptoms and counter them, the more successful we will be at achieving our goals.

Spending all day in front of the computer. Photo by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash.

Here are five ways that might help you in combating e-learning fatigue:

1. Reward yourself. 

Start by setting small achievable goals and when you complete a task, realise that you have, and acknowledge this fact! Stand up and dance like nobody’s watching! Have a couple of squares from that bar of chocolate. You will find that celebrating your success will lift a weight from your shoulders that you did not even know you carried, which will help you focus better and remain motivated.

2. Don’t get stuck in front of your screen.

I think this point is self-explanatory; as the saying goes, too much of anything is bad. Because of COVID-19, most of us already spend several hours in front of our computers, and now if you are doing an online programme, then it will be an additional few hours a day in front of the laptop. So, don’t forget to take regular breaks from the screen – go for a walk, play with the kids/pets, eat food with the family.

Not getting stuck in front of the screen is especially true for children. Most of the younger kids these days have gotten used to online classes, and they tend to spend more time on the screen watching something. Please encourage them to go out and play. It may be a good idea to go out and play with them; it will help both of you.

3. Try innovative learning methods.

This point is a continuation of the last point. When you take a break from your screen time, no one says you must stop studying. Let’s say you decide to go for a walk, or to the gym, or even for a drive – if you have an audio recording of your lesson, then take it with you and listen to it while you do these other activities. If you do not have an audio recording, then make a recording when you read the study material the first time around; you have your phone; how difficult is it to read aloud and press record?

I am sure there are a lot of other learning methods out there; this is just the one I have seen my nephew use. If you have used different methods, please share them with us in the comments below.

4. Power nap.

Photo by No Revisions on Unsplash.

The benefits of power naps have been known for ages; almost every civilisation in the world have followed some form of a power nap. I am not asking you to go to sleep; I am saying to take a nap for maybe thirty to forty-five minutes. According to an article in the Business Insider, “NASA’s research showed that naps really can fully restore cognitive function at the same rate as a full night’s sleep. The space agency found that pilots who slept in the cockpit for 26 minutes showed alertness improvements of up to 54% and job-performance improvements by 34%, compared to pilots who didn’t nap.”

5. Participate in class.

Human beings are social animals. One of the most significant benefits of doing an on-campus programme is the social interaction you can have with your peers, whether it is building long-lasting relationships, group studies, or just hanging out to relieve stress. Most online programmes have some form of live online classes, group chats or online forums, so please use these platforms to interact with your fellow students and the faculty actively. You might learn more and even make a few new friends.

In our programmes, we use online forums, live classroom sessions, and online week-long workshops (we call them residencies) to mitigate the impact of the missing face to face social interaction and keep everyone engaged. The residency is indeed one of the most appreciated parts of the programme, attesting to its value.


These are just five ways by which you could combat e-learning fatigue; I am sure there are many other methods to fighting e-learning fatigue out there that are more effective. Share which techniques worked best for you?

If you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree, and are ready to challenge yourself, look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and for details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

Top 5 Master’s programmes trending in 2022 

The purpose of pursuing a master’s programme could be many, advancement in career, aiming for a higher salary, growth opportunities, thirst for knowledge, switching careers, etc. A Master’s degree can be pursued to add knowledge on the subject already studied in an undergraduate degree or a new subject regardless of what was learned earlier. It could be your second degree, one of the several you pursued through the career or the very first degree you wanted to earn and get that formal qualification.  

There are numerous options and specialities that you can choose as your major for your master’s degree. However, a few majors have become hugely popular amongst students as these are in great demand by employers, offering better career prospects and employment opportunities.  

So, which master’s programme has made it to the top of the list in 2022? Let’s have a look: 

Top 5 Master’s programme in 2022

1. Project Management 

Just as the name suggests, a project manager takes the lead role in planning, organising and completing a project. Since the project manager skills are easily transferable, they can work in any industry such as banking, tech, retail, pharma, or telecom industry, to name a few.   

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

There has been an ever-increasing demand for project managers, and the economic hit suffered due to Covid-19 across the globe has only strengthened the need for project managers. The disruptions caused by the pandemic have resulted in governments earmarking and spending trillions of dollars on recovery projects.  

With millions of new projects across several industries being put into production, project management is here to stay.  

2. Procurement, Logistics and Supply Chain Management  

Another hugely sought-after specialisation in 2022 is supply chain management. The entire world faces supply crunches for several goods and essentials, with most being back ordered for months. The role of a good supply chain manager is to analyse business processes, identify efficient procurement sources, establish a stable, reliable, and cost-efficient logistics network, and always ensure sufficient inventory levels while minimising costs.  

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

A master’s degree in the field will ensure global career opportunities in purchasing, logistics and consulting.  

3. Leading Innovation and change 

In any business or organisation, change is inevitable. If you are a professional leading and supporting innovation and change in the organisation or community, this specialisation is right for you. A good innovation manager must be good at managing projects and managing change. They help shape the organisation’s culture and processes and provide necessary training to ensure innovative success. Modern organisations provide ample opportunity and rewarding careers for innovators in different roles such as Chief innovation officer, Business development lead, Innovation consultant, Change agent, Innovation strategist and Transformation manager.  

4. Healthcare Management 

If you are looking for a rewarding career focused on healthcare, a master’s degree in healthcare management can jumpstart your career in the field. As a healthcare administrator in roles such as healthcare consultant, Clinical Director, Administrator, and Healthcare manager, you can serve people and the community in improving their health while being on the administrative side of healthcare. There is an increasing demand for managers to look after the day-to-day operations and efficient management of resources in healthcare. 

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

5. Data Analytics 

In this changing and dynamic business environment, traditional methods of doing business and catering to consumer needs is a thing of the past. Nowadays, all businesses and services are being provided online. There is a need to understand consumer behaviour and cater to their specific and, where possible customised demand. The Internet has shrunk the world, and there is a sudden influx of information and big data. Big corporations want to defeat the competition and gain valuable insights into consumer behaviour by analysing data.  

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

The good news is that Robert Kennedy College offers all the above top trending specialisations of 2022. Talk to one of our advisors today about enrolling in one of these programmes!