All you need to know about Cryptocurrency and Blockchain Technology

Time is money, and both time and money are evolving rapidly. The discovery of the internet disrupted the way the world operated, bringing political, business, economic and social changes. It improved business processes and made online transactions, and banking, among other things, quicker and less complicated. And this is just the beginning; we humans are, after all, constant inventors and innovators.

Traditionally, political, economic, and legal systems structures are defined by contracts, transactions, and records. Nations and organisations set boundaries of operation to identify and chronicle managerial and social events.

But now it’s time for economic transformation. However, the slow and administrative regulations are stifling the digital transformation. 

Blockchain technology is here to help!

What is Blockchain?

Blockchain is an open, distributed technology that enables the process of recording unalterable transactions and tracking assets. Blockchain works on five basic principles:

  1. Distributed database
  2. Immutable records
  3. Transparent access
  4. Algorithm-based computational logic
  5. Two-way participant transmission
Photo credit: Pwc.com

Blockchain gets its name because of the way the transactions are grouped together into blocks of data, then chained together by way of a mathematical function that creates a hash code

Blockchain has disrupted the business industry with its application in financial services, healthcare, artificial intelligence (AI) and the internet of things (IoT) for supply chain, retail sector, oil and gas, telecommunications, insurance, smart contracts, voting and crypto of course.

So, how do blockchain technology and cryptocurrency work together?

Since its first implementation in 2009, blockchain has not been well known. Blockchain technology is the foundational technology for cryptocurrency, which was first implemented just a decade ago but was revolutionised with the widespread use of the application by Bitcoin. Bitcoin was the first cryptocurrency and operated through blockchain.

Blockchain is the foundational technology for cryptocurrency

Blockchain made it possible to record bitcoin transactions without a central authority establishing trust in a trustless environment. Being a digitalised, decentralised, public ledger, blockchain allows the formation of digital information into blocks, which are stored across a network of computers, creating a database. When verifiable transactions take place, the data is stored in blocks, which, when complete, are added to the chain.

Cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin and, USD Coin are used to buy goods and services. And cryptocurrency uses blockchain, an enhanced cryptographic security system, as a public ledger with immutable records that cannot be deleted or altered. 

Cryptocurrency is used as a digital form of cash to buy goods and services through various trading platforms or digital wallets. The blockchain technology here records the transaction when ownership is transferred to the new owner. Every transaction, therefore, is a public ledger, unalterable, secure and time-stamped.

The pace of technology will not slow down. Cryptocurrency and blockchain hand in hand continue to disrupt much more than the financial services industry. 

What are your thoughts? Share in the comments below.

Venturing into the world of Cryptocurrency – 5 reasons why businesses should move towards digital currency

One day I was sulking over the pitiful return I got from my money in a bank’s saving account (The rate of interest offered by my bank is a little shy of 0.01% for a balance over $5000 and 0% on balances less than $5000). My colleague shared a similar disappointing story of seeing his money stay the same over a period, giving no returns. He was a risk-taker and invested in crypto about a decade ago. I stayed put as I knew little about crypto and thought it was all a scam! Fast forward ten years, he now owns a healthy bank balance or, should I say, digital currency balance and a brand new mode of payment!

Cryptocurrency has come a long way in the last decade. Cryptocurrency ownership increased 63% just in 2020, and the valuation exceeded $2 trillion for the first time in April 2021. Bitcoin has been one of the oldest and most iconic cryptocurrencies in the blockchain domain. Closely following its footsteps is the Ethereum blockchain – the second largest digital coin. And both combined hold the most significant shares of crypto valuation.

This trend is here to stay and become a financial revolution in the currency world.

Photo credit: Canva.com

There is an increasing interest in buying and using cryptocurrency, especially among millennials, as this is the future of payments. Consumers don’t want to miss out on this lucrative investment opportunity or miss being part of the futuristic trend of being able to pay with digital currency for retail purchases. The market has a strong interest, and the findings suggest that current owners, former and even non-owners, are eager to own and use cryptocurrencies for making purchases in the future. As per the Cryptocurrency Payments Report May 2021, “12% of consumers (a projected 30 million) currently own one or more cryptocurrencies, 4.5% (11.5 million) have owned them in the past, and 17 million non-owners may acquire cryptocurrency to make purchases in the near future.”

Currently, crypto owners have spent their digital currency on making purchases of jewellery, grocery, online gaming/gambling, food delivery and even real estate. They would like to pay for retail products, travel, financial services, furniture and appliances and streaming services with cryptocurrency.

All they await is more merchants to open doors to cryptocurrency and start accepting the new mode of payment! So, merchants pay attention!

Here are 5 reasons why businesses should join this revolution and should consider accepting cryptocurrency:

1. Opening doors for new customers

Businesses can give their brand an instant facelift by accepting virtual currencies. It provides a cutting-edge image to the company, attracting new customers keen on spending cryptocurrency.

2. Lower fraud risk

Unlike credit cards, cryptocurrency is safe from chargebacks or fraud. The transactions processed with cryptocurrency usually cannot be reversed or cancelled, which means lesser chances of fraud.

3. Lower transaction fee

Businesses can potentially save a lot on the processing fees they usually pay on transactions using the traditional methods. With cryptocurrency, the processing cost will reduce even more if using the same blockchain crypto. Hence, businesses will eventually get a bigger slice of the profits.

4. Lesser trading risk

Cryptocurrencies are meant to pose smaller risks. The market fluctuations do not affect the value of your business when you are dealing in cryptocurrency.

5. Boundaryless payments

In this international market, especially in post-covid conditions, businesses can go global by accepting digital payments from anyone anywhere. Anyone having an internet connection can make a purchase without worrying about the exchange rates for currency conversions.


Cryptocurrencies have been gaining momentum and have caught the eye of one too many. This is one of the ways to stay ahead of the competition by taking on the forward-thinking opportunity.

Robert Kennedy College has recently become one of the merchants where one can pay with cryptocurrency. RKC offers a secure method to pay your course fees using Coinbase. Payment is accepted using Bitcoin, Ethereum, USD Coin and Litecoin.

Talk to one of our advisors on WhatsApp to know more about paying course fees using Coinbase.

5 easy steps to break free and get unstuck in your career!

Last week I talked about five reasons you feel stuck in your career. In my opinion, one spends considerable time developing their career and then working the job. And it is far from ideal if one keeps feeling stuck and unhappy in their jobs. Now, every problem has a solution. So here I present to you five easy steps to break free and get unstuck in your career:

1. Introspect, revaluate, and develop new skillsets

There is new competition and talent added to the job market every day. Fresh graduates and experienced professionals with unique skills dominate the workspace. It is but natural to feel that your skillsets have become outdated. Now is the time to do some introspection and reassess your skillsets. Start by writing down your skills, even those you use in your personal life. You may be surprised to discover that those skills you never thought could be helpful in the professional diaspora are actually useful. Also, keep learning and adding the latest qualifications to keep abreast of the competition. You can also upgrade your education to a Master’s degree by studying online with RKC.

Photo credit: Unsplash.com by Tim Mossholder

2. Move past the fear

You must come out of the shadow of fear. If talking to your supervisor about your career growth, new opportunities, or searching for new jobs instils fear of the unknown, then you are not pushing yourself and limiting your potential.

Learn to be outgoing and gather feedback from trustworthy colleagues about yourself. Make lists of pros and cons and identify the top things you fear most.

3. Evaluate your priorities

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

Money could have been your priority before. But when you have reached a point where the job does not offer any challenges and has become monotonous. Yes, we work to pay our bills. However, it might make better sense to be in a job that might pay slightly less but the one that you enjoy doing every day.

4. Better late than never

Often you might be given some promises by the management of an upcoming raise or promotion. You end up waiting for that performance review, bonus, or annual increment. Because you are comfortable and used to working in that position, you might want to wait for the decision and what’s in store for you. But instead of waiting (sometimes in vain), you should keep planning for the change and look for better opportunities.

5. Create a roadmap and manifest

Photo credit: Unsplash.com by Matt Duncan

You might be feeling stuck in your job because you don’t know what you want to do in the future. Without a goal, you might just be wasting your efforts. Try to channel your focus on what you want to do and grow your career. Invest sometime in yourself and research what areas might interest you. It might be time-consuming, but once you have a clear understanding, you will have a clear path and purpose.

I hope these five simple steps will help change your thought process and help actualise your dream career! Let me know your thoughts in the comments below.

5 reasons you feel stuck in your career

From early childhood, we start idolising people – our parents, grandparents, teachers, aunts and uncles, pop stars, a pilot, cops or firefighters. As soon as we are old enough to understand what each person around us does for a living, we start either liking or disliking it. Subconsciously, our minds begin making choices about which ‘profession’ we would like to venture into and which we dislike. We are also groomed (or maybe forced in some cases) to choose a career path that is traditionally high paying and secure.

But eventually, I guess we all choose something that we like doing or that we are good at.

I know I could just end the blog here and say ‘happily ever after’ went our careers. But sometimes, no matter how wisely we choose a career or job for ourselves, there may arise a standpoint when you start feeling stuck in that job. In simple words, feeling stuck in a situation where you seem not to be able to leave your present job but feel highly dissatisfied with work. The same mundane tasks you have mastered over the years do not offer any more learning or excitement, and you do not look forward to going to work.

While there can be numerous reasons why you may be feeling stuck at work, in my opinion, here are the top 5 reasons that might resonate with you:

1. Accepting a job role without understanding it entirely

At the time, you may have felt this job role was appropriate for you, something you always dreamt of doing. But eventually, you realise the position is much more or much less than you expected. The role does not fit like a glove but, in actuality, feels like a noose.

2.  $$$$ ruled

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

When you signed on for the job, it offered a lucrative signing bonus with stock options and an unbelievable year-end bonus! It was too good to be true, and it was irresistible. It’s only when you started the job and over time that you realised the downside of all the ‘extra’ money you received. You might not feel that the money is not worth the time and effort you must put in. The work-life balance has only become a topic for discussion as you have not experienced a day without stress and pressure at work.

3. Outdated skillset

Photo credit:Canva.com

Many people will agree that they achieve job satisfaction from not just the salaries and bonuses they receive, but greater satisfaction is realised when they see their meaningful contributions resulting in higher profits, efficiency, or global expansions. A continuous learning curve is a high point for many people to feel happy in their careers. If this is lacking and you think your skills are becoming redundant, dissatisfaction starts sinking in. You may feel worthless and lose confidence eventually in your skillset.

4. Not enough recognition at work

This is another factor that makes you feel stuck at work. Your work is not recognised, and your boss has been fending the next promotion and increment questions you have been asking for. Even after mastering the work and putting in time and effort, your job does not seem rewarding anymore.

5. Fear factor

Photo credit: Canva.com

Change is not everyone’s cup of tea. Everyone is afraid of the unknown. Stagnation happens when you are fearful of making a move. You may be applying for a new job, but inside, you know you are stuck in the current job and unable to move. Not receiving any favourable response from job search also reinstates the lingering fear.

Our career is one of the most important aspects of our lives. Most of us spend the majority of our time, say 8-10 hours, at our jobs out of the 24 hours. You can follow a few simple steps to overcome this situation of feeling stuck at work. Stay tuned and check out this space for my next blog, five easy steps to break free and get unstuck in your career!

Live session with Robert Kennedy College Dean Dr. iur. David Costa

Yesterday, Robert Kennedy College (RKC) Dean, Dr David Costa, conducted a live session introducing our 100% online master’s and bachelor’s degree programmes. This interactive session was held online and was packed with essential facts and information about the college, the universities RKC has partnerships with, and the master’s and bachelor’s programmes we offer. The session received an overwhelming response and participation from all the attendees.

As the session began, Prof. David Costa gave a brief presentation about the history of Robert Kennedy College. He also provided information about the University of Cumbria, the University of Salford and York St John University. The presentation also showed the participant’s sample degrees certificates and transcripts from all three universities.

Prof. Costa also explained the reasons that make RKC’s degrees unique. The factors include (but are not limited to):

  • a practical and flexible online programme
  • minimum duration of one year
  • 100% online, contemporary courses
  • no formal examination system, assessment based on assignments
  • British degrees that are recognized worldwide

Prof. Costa also discussed the fee information and the discounts being currently offered. He also introduced our “ask the Ambassador” initiative, which allows you to chat with either a current student or alumni and ask any programme related questions or about their experience studying at RKC.

After the presentation, Prof. Costa opened the floor to questions from the interested candidates. He answered queries ranging from fee information, assessment method, eligibility requirements, referral discounts, course delivery methods, and more.

Does this look like something you wanted to attend and get information first-hand from the Dean himself? Do not worry. You can watch the live session recording and find answers to your questions. And if you still have questions or feel confident to apply right away, talk to one of our advisors in real-time on WhatsApp.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Paul

Continuing our a day in the life of RKC student series, we asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. 

There is no better way but to learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student! Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision..

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am Paul M.

Which programme did you choose and why?

The MBA programme. The MBA obviously has the essential business basics, that improves our ability as leaders with contemporaneous knowledge of current best practices combined with reiteration of essential skills which every leader should know. I chose RKC because of the convenience of an online degree and the fact that it partnered with quality UK universities.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

Robert Burns’ poem To a Mouse, (1786) includes the line “the best made plans of mice and men” which is interpreted that even the best made plans will go wrong…and they did. I set aside time each evening for course reading and the online availability made it easy when traveling. Over weekends, I was locked down on Sunday evenings until midnight, regardless. Each week required at least 12 -20 hours of study time to see any progress.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

Evenings and the occasional early morning.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?  

Each class has different requirements, so this is tough to quantify. In average each assignment (Paper/ report) requires around 40 hours of self directed study and another 20 in terms of prep and writing the paper. The dissertation is a whole different time management project and requires STRUCTURE, if you cannot be structured and meet / set deadlines this will be a challenge.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Travelling and Communication  

How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

If there was internet, I was on the site!

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

Some direct messaging and interactions mostly on the forums. It was much more due to COVID.

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

FIRST THING 1) Check forum posts

2) Check for any updates on syllabus and deadlines 3) Plan any activity for the day 4) Regular work day 5) Study one to two hours and engage on forum.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

Have a plan and work the plan. If you fail, reset and get back on the plan, learn to adapt to the challenges that life sends you. Above all have fun the end result is worth it.

I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and answers to any questions you may have.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Tahera Sultana

Continuing with our series of blogs that answer some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get asked frequently by students looking to join one of our online programmes. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

Let’s learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student!

Be disciplined and prepared to devote time and energy to the course.

Tahera Sultana

An Introduction

Photo by Vladislav Klapin on Unsplash.

Who are you?

Hi, my name is Tahera Sultana (it means pure). I am female, married with no children. I am also a Compliance Officer and have worked for different financial institutions for more than 20 years.

Which programme did you choose and why?

I am studying the Master of Laws (LLM) programme. I have been working in the compliance field for over twenty years, and I find more of my colleagues and subordinates are law graduates. I thought to myself, if I pursue a law degree, I could enhance my knowledge grow beyond being a Compliance Officer.

The Study Plan

Photo by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I am a full-time employee and a part-time student. Before starting a module, I will understand the module requirement that I am about to enrol. Each week, I print out all presentation material and listen to the recorded lecture; I make my notes and review the lecture a few times until I can digest the topic. I spent approximately one hour per week on lectures and 2-3 hours reading time for the required chapter in the module.

I spent most of the time working on my given assignment. The research process takes up to 10 hours. After reading the related material, I will start writing the paper. As I have done three modules so far in the programme, writing time takes up to 5-6 hours per 1,000 words. As a full-time employee, I work on my assignment in the evening and during the weekend. Assignment time is not an easy task for me, but a very fruitful experience. I enjoy writing on meaningful and interesting topics.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

I had no choice in choosing my study time. For me, after work is the most suitable time to study. If I had a choice, I would have chosen early mornings to do my studies. For the most part, weekends are not good for me because I work from Monday to Friday, from 9:00 am to 7:30 pm (normal office hours is 9 to 6, but in Hong Kong, we have unofficial long working hours). Over the weekend, I go hiking and spend time with my family. If I have to complete an assignment, I will work extra hours during the week to meet the deadline. I will also skip hiking and family time to achieve the goal.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

Every 1000 words will take me approximately 5-6 hours of writing time. I devote approximately 20 to 22 hours to each assignment (excluding research & reading material).

Travelling and Communication

The challenges of learning while travelling. Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash.

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

I find it very hard to study if I have to travel. I may skip one weeks’ lecture and catch up in the coming weeks, i.e., after my business travel. If I have to submit an assignment during my travel, I carry all my research material onto the aircraft and work during the flight. I remember, it was late Jan 2020, I had to fly from Hong Kong to London; I worked 10 hours on the flight. Fortunately, I had three hours of sleep during that trip.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

Interacting with peers and professors is no big deal in these modules. We have once or twice zoom / Blue Jean meetings in each module. I am not concerned about the time difference, as I am in Asia; 3:00 pm London/Swiss time is 9:00 pm Hong Kong time. That suits me, for I can join after office hours. However, when I am travelling, there will be a problem with the change in the time difference, and I might end up missing the meeting. At one time I remember I used my computer in the hotel during my business trip to interact with the whole class; I could not hear clearly what they were discussing due to hotel Wi-Fi.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

I find myself glad that there is an online course that I can take advantage of. I can still work as a full-time employee and study during my off-hours, although it is not an easy task when there is travelling involved. I take pride in my decision to gain a Master’s degree; I understand that hard work is needed, and I know this will help me progress and enhance to the next level.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Be disciplined and prepared to devote time and energy to the course. Know that all classmates are your partners, and the professors are very experienced and are there to help you succeed. I am glad that I made a good choice to achieve my Master’s degree.


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and for details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

#Dilo – A day in the life of an RKC student – Wilson K

As a former Education advisor, if I had to pick one of the most frequently asked questions by prospective students, it would be “How many hours do I need to study?”  

The vast majority (if not all) of our students are working and leading hectic professional lives. Some are motivated and have already decided to undertake a master’s, while others contemplate the unknowns of an online programme. In my experience, two things affect their decision the most.   

First – finances, and second, being able to strike the perfect work, study, and life balance. While I cannot completely help you with the finances (partially yes – check out the discount offers currently being offered on our online MBA, MSc, and LL.M programmes), I thought what I could do to help was to bring some facts to light about the other unknowns – what does a typical day in the life of an online master’s student look like?  

I asked a few of our students from different walks of life, occupations, and personal situations to answer a few questions on their study tactics and strategies, plans and reality, and so on.  So, through our ‘#DILO ‘a typical day in the life of a master’s student’ blog series every month, we bring to you one of our actual students or alumni sharing the insights.   

Today, we’re looking at Wilson’s typical study days. Wilson, the Managing Director of an advertising company in Kenya for the past 14 years, offered us these answers:

An Introduction  

Vidhi Kapoor (VK): Which programme did you choose and why?  

Wilson K (WK): I chose an MBA programme in International Business in order to boost my wealth of knowledge for conducting business through a wider lens that could help me steer the company and any new initiatives to greater heights from an informed foundation.

A person writing on a piece of paper

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Stayed focused and consistent

The Study Plan   

VK : How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?  

WK:  While the modules are structured with the ease of flexibility, the fundamental aspect is that each revolves around the individual’s ability to keep the pace as a member of a group class. And this means serious balancing between work expectations and deadlines, not to mention that you must also research and study to reflect the mind of a master’s student. My strategy was to allocate the first 2 hours on Monday, 2 hours Wednesday morning and at least 3 hours on Friday to catch up with the reading and contribute to class work and assignments as well. 

VK: What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

WK: I found morning hours very apt especially if the assigned time implied adjusting your wake-up schedule and morning routine. The mind is less polluted and cluttered with the day’s requirement and one is able not only to concentrate but also bring out the best in terms of thinking and concentration.

A clock on a table

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Wilson allocated time based upon the requirements of each assignment

VK: How much time did you devote for each assignment?  

WK: Time devotion for each assignment was dictated by the requirements and details of the questions. In most cases, each weekly assignment needed about 4 hours, but the examinations required at least 4 days considering that one is given the benefit of knowing each paper in advance.

Travelling and Communication  

VK: Did you travel for work? How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

DA:  My work involves a lot of travel around the country but whenever such need arose, I had to plan for a trade-off in terms of hours where either delegation or relegation of priorities had to be effected. Missed classwork and deadlines sounded like the best recipe for failing a module and facing the menacing consequences that are well defined within the rules.

VK: How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

WK: With proper planning and calculated awareness of time differences, I really can’t say I had a problem interacting with peers. The University timetable was also well aligned to this as both the classwork and assignment deadlines did not create overly demanding adjustments.

A typical day as a master’s student  

VK: What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

WK: A typical day comes with lots of anxiety on not only how well you are faring in class but your preparedness towards the assessments. You also have to keep check of your performance within the organisation especially if you are a leader so that you do not jeopardize the organization you guide.

Any advice?  

VK:Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

WK: This programme demands individual discipline especially on time management. The risk of just skimming through the course is real and the most important thing to keep at the back of the head is that this should not just be for passing the exams and getting an award but to ensure that you obtain the incredible insights that propels your line of thought, intelligence, and faculties higher than where you are today.

   

A person working on a computer

Description automatically generated with low confidence

Wilson says the programme aims forthe incredible insights that propels your line of thought, intelligence, and faculties higher than where you are today.

Alright friends, this was a sneak peek of a typical day in Wilson’s life as a master’s student. I hope you find it insightful and informative and that it gives you an idea of what to expect when you enrol for our master’s programmes. Watch this space as we have many more interesting insights coming up! 

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Premprakash

Sometimes, the fear of the unknown is more of a hindrance in achieving your end goal. Once you are past this fear and are well informed, it is just a matter of planning your path. Similar is the plight of students who want to study of online but face the fear of the unknown, such as : What is the best way to study online? Should you do an online programme? How to better manage time when learning online? And so on. 

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

These are all questions that we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get regularly asked by students looking to join one of our online programmes. Undertaking to do an online master’s degree programme will be an additional commitment to your time and finances, and it is wise to get information beforehand.

Through this continuing series of blog posts, some of our past and current students have shared their experiences, thoughts and opinions and given their feedback on handling some of these choices and situations. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

This time we have an alumnus from the University of Cumbria and Robert Kennedy College, MBA Leadership & Sustainability programme, Premprakash. 

An Introduction

Which Uni are you studying with?

University of Cumbria

Which programme did you choose and why?

MBA Leadership & Sustainability

The Study Plan

A hand holding a phone

Description automatically generated with low confidencePhoto by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

Minimum of six hours daily. I work better under pressure. The two modules that I enjoyed the most were IMS (Information Management) and Marketing Management. I did them together, and it turned out to be two distinctions! IMS Professor Radu was someone I really liked. His reply to the forums and interims was why I achieved high marks in IMS.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

After midnight through to early mornings all week plus the weekends.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

For the interim assignment I spent one week and, for final assessments about two weeks’ time. I completed my dissertation within the 6-month minimum period. 

Travelling and Communication

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

The Online residency was a lifesaver as Covid19 disrupted travel to the UK. 

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

The time difference did not pose any problems for me.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

Studying keeps me happy, focused, and desiring more knowledge.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Never give up!!!

A to the point and practical advice by our alumni. I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and provided that motivational boost to your academic plans..You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer and the application process.

Top 5 Master’s programmes trending in 2022 

The purpose of pursuing a master’s programme could be many, advancement in career, aiming for a higher salary, growth opportunities, thirst for knowledge, switching careers, etc. A Master’s degree can be pursued to add knowledge on the subject already studied in an undergraduate degree or a new subject regardless of what was learned earlier. It could be your second degree, one of the several you pursued through the career or the very first degree you wanted to earn and get that formal qualification.  

There are numerous options and specialities that you can choose as your major for your master’s degree. However, a few majors have become hugely popular amongst students as these are in great demand by employers, offering better career prospects and employment opportunities.  

So, which master’s programme has made it to the top of the list in 2022? Let’s have a look: 

Top 5 Master’s programme in 2022

1. Project Management 

Just as the name suggests, a project manager takes the lead role in planning, organising and completing a project. Since the project manager skills are easily transferable, they can work in any industry such as banking, tech, retail, pharma, or telecom industry, to name a few.   

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

There has been an ever-increasing demand for project managers, and the economic hit suffered due to Covid-19 across the globe has only strengthened the need for project managers. The disruptions caused by the pandemic have resulted in governments earmarking and spending trillions of dollars on recovery projects.  

With millions of new projects across several industries being put into production, project management is here to stay.  

2. Procurement, Logistics and Supply Chain Management  

Another hugely sought-after specialisation in 2022 is supply chain management. The entire world faces supply crunches for several goods and essentials, with most being back ordered for months. The role of a good supply chain manager is to analyse business processes, identify efficient procurement sources, establish a stable, reliable, and cost-efficient logistics network, and always ensure sufficient inventory levels while minimising costs.  

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

A master’s degree in the field will ensure global career opportunities in purchasing, logistics and consulting.  

3. Leading Innovation and change 

In any business or organisation, change is inevitable. If you are a professional leading and supporting innovation and change in the organisation or community, this specialisation is right for you. A good innovation manager must be good at managing projects and managing change. They help shape the organisation’s culture and processes and provide necessary training to ensure innovative success. Modern organisations provide ample opportunity and rewarding careers for innovators in different roles such as Chief innovation officer, Business development lead, Innovation consultant, Change agent, Innovation strategist and Transformation manager.  

4. Healthcare Management 

If you are looking for a rewarding career focused on healthcare, a master’s degree in healthcare management can jumpstart your career in the field. As a healthcare administrator in roles such as healthcare consultant, Clinical Director, Administrator, and Healthcare manager, you can serve people and the community in improving their health while being on the administrative side of healthcare. There is an increasing demand for managers to look after the day-to-day operations and efficient management of resources in healthcare. 

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

5. Data Analytics 

In this changing and dynamic business environment, traditional methods of doing business and catering to consumer needs is a thing of the past. Nowadays, all businesses and services are being provided online. There is a need to understand consumer behaviour and cater to their specific and, where possible customised demand. The Internet has shrunk the world, and there is a sudden influx of information and big data. Big corporations want to defeat the competition and gain valuable insights into consumer behaviour by analysing data.  

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

The good news is that Robert Kennedy College offers all the above top trending specialisations of 2022. Talk to one of our advisors today about enrolling in one of these programmes!