Future of Healthcare professionals

 

HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY – STA·TUS QUO

Demand for healthcare services has unobtrusively risen over a period of time now and this growth will continue into the future. The demand for services translates into ever-increasing demand for healthcare workers – including nurses, physicians, allied health professionals, technologists and coders, leaders, and support personnel. Like any other industry, it’s an upward trend in the long term, for the healthcare sector employment. However, the healthcare industry does not seem to be prepared enough to cater to this increasing workforce demand. Increasing demand has been accompanied by a growing number of unfilled jobs, a serious challenge that can be perceived in the federal labor data and on the digital job boards of hospitals and health systems, where hundreds and even thousands of open jobs are posted. Both growth trends and growth challenges will continue into 2018 and beyond.

 

 

WHERE IS THE FUTURE?

The amount of money that is projected to be spent on healthcare in the future, is cogent indicator of rising demand for healthcare services and healthcare workers. More than doubling from 2010 to 2025, when it reaches beyond $55 trillion, expenditures include payments for all healthcare costs, including pharmaceuticals, equipment and technology. However, labor constitutes the single greatest cost for most healthcare organisations.

This growing trend, has translated into a flurry of jobs openings in the healthcare sector. Even in 2017, despite the continued debate over the future of healthcare policy, the healthcare industry has added an average of 24,000 jobs each month. That’s vigorous growth in any industry. Employment growth is expected to continue for the foreseeable future. While healthcare job growth will ebb and flow in the future, the trajectory of growth has been consistently upward.

HOW CAN YOU FIT IN THE DEMAND SUPPLY GAP?

While job openings have ascended steadily over the years, the job hires remained relatively static. Traditionally openings have outpaced job hires in healthcare and the gap between openings and hires has been widening rapidly since 2014. This swelling gap – which represents a cumulative number of unfilled jobs – shows the challenges that healthcare providers face in finding enough practitioners and support personnel to fill today’s job openings. Other data reveals that the problem of high demand for healthcare workers, and low supply of those workers, may continue well into the future. The statistics on the projected future job openings  provides the healthcare providers the crucial insight on the demand for healthcare services and healthcare professionals. These are the jobs that healthcare providers will need to fill in the future.

 

At Robert Kennedy College, we offer Online MBA International Healthcare Management Programme, in exclusive partnership with University of Cumbria, UK. Recognise the workforce shortage in the healthcare sector and be there where there are abundant jobs. The MBA IHM could prove be the key to your success and better future. Follow the link to receive the course catalogue and get a chance for free trial offers: https://college.ch/catalogue?programme=mbaihm&nodejs=1&j=fbpagemt

 

Achieving the perfect Work-Life-Study Balance

If you are looking either to advance in or to switch careers; online education can help fastrack your career goals. An online student today, typically is a 34 year old, employed in high demanding jobs.

Juggling a career with education is a challenge.

Today, given the flexibility of online education, it’s no surprise that – it’s those very working professionals who are drawn to the virtual classroom.

 

Apart from making the decision about the choice of the University and choice of the course that you want to pursue, another major decision that most of our prospective students face is time-management and achieving that perfect work-life-study balance. Apart from money, time is the biggest commitment that you are going to make towards your Online Education. You may already be running deadlines at your workplace and at the same time have to keep up pace with Online lectures and ensure timely submission of assignments. Studying while working will require some sacrifices, particularly in your social life.
 
Finding this balance is becoming harder, not easier. ‘Healthy mind in a healthy body’ is one of the most popular slogans we have always heard; more so because it is so sensible. Both the mind and the body’s health is optimised by balancing your work life with your personal life. So here are few quick pointers that will help you maintain the most crucial balance of – work-life-study:
  • Make lists – Be organised and make lists of things to be done at work, study and home.
  • Set Goals – Set achievable goals and targets for yourself.
  • Manage your time – Plan your whole work/study week and what you have to accomplish really helps.
  • Do not Procrastinate – Do not leave things to last minute.
  • Do not succumb to pressures – There will always be work pressure. Studying will only add to the already sweltering pressures. Keep your calm. Remember that you are only a human and it is only so much you can do in a 24hour day. Divide ample time to your personal life as well after work and study.

 

Pursue your goal for higher education with Robert Kennedy College Online Masters’ Programme. Download the catalogue here: https://college.ch/catalogue?r=allcumbria&j=fbpagemt

 

Procrastination.. Saving for tomorrow…….

Normally I would have published this weekly blog couple of days ago; so what different happened this time?….. I did Procrastinate!

I had been thinking hard to come up with a relevant topic all last week, when this idea struck me suddenly, ‘This is it!’, I thought – this is something all, students and professionals, can easily relate to and deal with in their daily lives. I was smirking that I got so much to write on this topic, I will finish the blog in no time! I should start tomorrow.. I thought to myself. And here we are! 🙂

So What is Procrastination?

Dictionary
pro·cras·ti·na·tion
prəˌkrastəˈnāSH(ə)n/
noun
  1. the action of delaying or postponing something.
    “your first tip is to avoid procrastination”

Now that we have fair idea of what Procrastination means (I know, we know what it means, we live it everyday, well almost most of us..), I would like you to watch this interesting video that I found about procrastination:

Why do we procrastinate? According to Tim Urban, all of us have an instant gratification monkey within us. 🙂

Prof Pychyl says procrastination is making the choice to avoid doing something, even though we know this will cost us in the long run. He says it is different from intentionally delaying doing something, and it is not a problem of time management, but a failure to control our emotions. The problem is our brains are programmed to procrastinate.

“When we procrastinate, we are trying to improve our mood by avoiding doing something that feels unpleasant to us,” he says.

“A bit like getting drunk or comfort eating, it is a coping strategy to feel better by distracting ourselves with short-term pleasure and forgetting about a problem.”

Lecturers suffer from procrastination too, with academic Twitter feeds talking about “writing guilt” and the battle between marking papers and watching Netflix.

With more people studying online, procrastination is a greater problem than ever before. As a student studying online courses, we do postpone our assignments and research papers and even studying for exams. 

So what can we do to avoid Procrastination?

Well these are the top quick fixes that really help me get back on the track:

  1. Removing the obstacles to my task
  2. Re-aligning my focus
  3. Start from the start, no matter where I am – just dive into the task
  4. I don’t punish myself for not starting earlier….
  5. Set new realistic goals and be happy about it
  6. I tell myself that I don’t need to be perfect….it is alright to be imperfect
  7. Remove all fears about completing the task now
  8. And most importantly, I remind myself that all great people Do Procrastinate – from Steve Jobs to Frank Lloyd to Bill Clinton.

I interestingly, also found in a study that procrastination is in fact not that bad, as the procrastinators’ ideas were 28 percent more creative.

 

Do not procrastinate about your decision to study Masters. Find out more about the MBA, MSc, MA and LLMs programmes that we offer; get a catalogue now: https://college.ch/catalogue?r=allcumbria&j=fbpagemt

 

Writing Masters Level Assignments

A Master’s degree is critically different from a Bachelor’s degree. Though similar on some, Master’s degree will involve a lot of different aspects than a Bachelor’s.

At Master’s level you could be studying one of the many specialised courses offered by Robert Kennedy College, as MBA International Health Management, LLM – Master of Law International Business Law , MBA Leading Innovation and Change or Master of Science Project Management.

Taught Master’s are usually modular in form, featuring a range of optional modules the student can choose from, with a final dissertation at the end of the course, usually produced over the final semester.

Writing assignments at Master’s level

You must use language appropriate to the academic environment, and a coherent and strong structure to your work is essential. Assignments will be longer at Master’s level, even for unassessed pieces of work. Do not be overwhelmed by larger word counts. Remember, you made a large step up in intensity of work from school to university, so another step-up is well within your capabilities.

Clarity is important. Do not use over-elaborate vocabulary and grammar just because you think you have to. It is more important to be understood.

Time management is crucial for the Master’s student – with a heavier workload you will find that a good weekly plan, and a firm grasp of deadlines, is essential. This is especially true with the dissertation which will be the longest assignment you will have done yet at university, usually covering a period of several months. It is important to set yourself deadlines for drafts.

Here are the various aspects of writing skills that Master’s students should be concentrating on in order to succeed.

THE MASTERS LEVEL

One of the first things most Master’s students notice once they have started is how much more intense a Master’s degree is than an undergraduate degree. It is a less passive experience; you will not be guided as much by the lecturers, and will be expected to think for yourself more.

Master’s requires a new way of approaching academic work, all the groundwork has been done at undergraduate level. Let’s look at the features of a Master’s more closely.

ORIGINAL RESEARCH

A Master’s degree is geared towards the delivery of a piece of original research. For research Master’s students this will be your primary focus. For those doing taught Master’s this will form part of all aspects of your degree, not just the final dissertation.

In your original research you should also aim for originality where possible. You are being asked to look at your subject in a fresh and innovative way, and finding a new or underdeveloped area of your subject, or a new way of looking at an established area, will help you gain better marks.

THEORY

Master’s are not exercises in description. You will need to find a theoretical basis for your work. Many Master’s will run modules on the subject of theory, it is advisable to attend all available classes on the subject of theory as it will help you to form an idea of the theory which surrounds your subject. Theory forms a useful framework to hang your research on.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS

Another important part of Master’s writing is critical analysis. A critical analysis is one which assesses the quality and usefulness of the sources which you are using in your assignments. This process involves considering all aspects of the source and its contents.

 

Download the course catalogue here: https://college.ch/catalogue?j=fbpagemt

Dean’s Message for the New Year 2018

Prof. Dr. iur. David Costa, Dean Robert Kennedy College, wishing all of our graduates, students: current and prospective, a very happy and successful New Year 2018. Encouraging everyone to start something new and achieve new goals.

Get inspired with the dean’s message:

 

So let your career take-off and achieve new heights this new year. Our one year online masters’ degree programmes combine quality British education with Swiss ingenuity. Download the catalogue here: https://college.ch/catalogue?j=fbpagemt

 

MALIC: Renewed partnership between YSJU and RKC

Perhaps you have already heard of the York St John MA Leading Innovation and Change (MALIC). One of your business contacts may be a MALIC, or perhaps you are one yourself. There are many MALICs out there – a network of more than 600 professionals who all have one thing in common – they have obtained their degree from York St John University, online. To be more precise, in a blended-learning delivery, with a one week residency in York or Zürich, by virtue of our exclusive partnership with YSJU.

Partnership agreement between YSJ and RKC continues

I am very excited to report that we expect an increase in the number of MALICs: true to their common mission, YSJ and RKC have recently met at the highest level in order to renew their commitment to deliver MALIC at a global level, reaching people all over the world and allowing them to study while continuing their (most often full-time) jobs. Professor Karen Stanton, Vice Chancellor of York St John University, and David Chesser, Chief Operating Officer, met with Prof David Costa, Dean of Robert Kennedy College, Stefano Costa, CFO, and Prof David Duffill, Deputy Dean, and officially signed the agreement.

YSJ - RKC - MALIC Signing

With graduates in over 100 countries, MALIC is one of the largest global Master programmes, and we are very excited about being able to increase these numbers and thus do our little bit in improving the overall quality of leadership in the work place.

Reflection session

Reflection session during the September 2015 residency in York

Whether it is at one of our York or Zürich residencies, or at graduation in the most impressive York Minster, it is always humbling to meet our students in the flesh – CEOs, senior managers, junior managers, serial entrepreneurs, vice-presidents – and yet they all went back to school, with a deep desire to improve and learn. For that, hat off!

YSJ Graduation Day with RKC students

Why MALIC?

Sometimes I ask my students, when they start their first module, what made them join the programme. For many it was the desire to understand why projects fail, how to be a better leader, how to deal with a difficult boss, or simply because they never had the time to go to school before life took over! And one of the most rewarding experiences is to receive, every now and again, an email that talks about life after MALIC (although sometimes it is also about life during MALIC).
“One of my critical learning points was the MALIC program was instantly transferable and immediately relevant, the course has had a dramatic impact on how I operate within different cultures. My appreciation and awareness of how people respond, react and need empathetic leadership styles in varying cultures has been tremendous.” – Simon
“Besides being a farmer I teach in AICAT (Arava International Centre for Agricultural Training). We bring 700 agricultural students from the Asian countries over for a 10-month, hands-on experience. I teach Agro-economics and Agro-entrepreneurship and from day one of my studies [in MALIC] I began using my newly gained knowledge, such as Schein’s Cultural Understandings and Kotter’s Eight Stages of Leading Change. The best part of the online experience was the interaction with other students. Same books, same articles, same questions but such diverse answers and understandings from fellow students; culture galore on the RKC forums.” – Eyal
 “My study at RKC has deepened my insight into the different antecedents of innovation and successful change that need to be strengthened in my work and working environment. It has boosted my concern for people. It has enabled me to respect others’ perspectives, even seek contrary or novel views and value the contributions people can make no matter what their status in the organisation.” – Pius
Don’t think it is all milk and honey though – studying online is challenging, albeit rewarding. You need strong time management skills and discipline, but with proper support achieving an academic degree while working is doable. You get support from us, as academics, and from our amazing StudentCare team, but we found that, perhaps most importantly, the best support comes from your peers, your colleagues who are experiencing the same challenges and conversations. Eyal and Pius, above, have met at the residency in York after taking a few classes online together, and I’ve never seen a bigger hug than these two big guys shared.

So, one might say we have done well so far – we will strive to do even better, and perhaps, who knows, if you are not a MALIC yourself, the time has come to become one! With a new, modular approach, in which you can build your programme in a module by module approach, there has never been a better time to learn! If you want to learn more about MALIC, have a look at our MALIC website and request a catalogue – our admissions team will also be happy to answer any questions you may have.