Future of Healthcare professionals

 

HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY – STA·TUS QUO

Demand for healthcare services has unobtrusively risen over a period of time now and this growth will continue into the future. The demand for services translates into ever-increasing demand for healthcare workers – including nurses, physicians, allied health professionals, technologists and coders, leaders, and support personnel. Like any other industry, it’s an upward trend in the long term, for the healthcare sector employment. However, the healthcare industry does not seem to be prepared enough to cater to this increasing workforce demand. Increasing demand has been accompanied by a growing number of unfilled jobs, a serious challenge that can be perceived in the federal labor data and on the digital job boards of hospitals and health systems, where hundreds and even thousands of open jobs are posted. Both growth trends and growth challenges will continue into 2018 and beyond.

 

 

WHERE IS THE FUTURE?

The amount of money that is projected to be spent on healthcare in the future, is cogent indicator of rising demand for healthcare services and healthcare workers. More than doubling from 2010 to 2025, when it reaches beyond $55 trillion, expenditures include payments for all healthcare costs, including pharmaceuticals, equipment and technology. However, labor constitutes the single greatest cost for most healthcare organisations.

This growing trend, has translated into a flurry of jobs openings in the healthcare sector. Even in 2017, despite the continued debate over the future of healthcare policy, the healthcare industry has added an average of 24,000 jobs each month. That’s vigorous growth in any industry. Employment growth is expected to continue for the foreseeable future. While healthcare job growth will ebb and flow in the future, the trajectory of growth has been consistently upward.

HOW CAN YOU FIT IN THE DEMAND SUPPLY GAP?

While job openings have ascended steadily over the years, the job hires remained relatively static. Traditionally openings have outpaced job hires in healthcare and the gap between openings and hires has been widening rapidly since 2014. This swelling gap – which represents a cumulative number of unfilled jobs – shows the challenges that healthcare providers face in finding enough practitioners and support personnel to fill today’s job openings. Other data reveals that the problem of high demand for healthcare workers, and low supply of those workers, may continue well into the future. The statistics on the projected future job openings  provides the healthcare providers the crucial insight on the demand for healthcare services and healthcare professionals. These are the jobs that healthcare providers will need to fill in the future.

 

At Robert Kennedy College, we offer Online MBA International Healthcare Management Programme, in exclusive partnership with University of Cumbria, UK. Recognise the workforce shortage in the healthcare sector and be there where there are abundant jobs. The MBA IHM could prove be the key to your success and better future. Follow the link to receive the course catalogue and get a chance for free trial offers: https://college.ch/catalogue?programme=mbaihm&nodejs=1&j=fbpagemt

 

Achieving the perfect Work-Life-Study Balance

If you are looking either to advance in or to switch careers; online education can help fastrack your career goals. An online student today, typically is a 34 year old, employed in high demanding jobs.

Juggling a career with education is a challenge.

Today, given the flexibility of online education, it’s no surprise that – it’s those very working professionals who are drawn to the virtual classroom.

 

Apart from making the decision about the choice of the University and choice of the course that you want to pursue, another major decision that most of our prospective students face is time-management and achieving that perfect work-life-study balance. Apart from money, time is the biggest commitment that you are going to make towards your Online Education. You may already be running deadlines at your workplace and at the same time have to keep up pace with Online lectures and ensure timely submission of assignments. Studying while working will require some sacrifices, particularly in your social life.
 
Finding this balance is becoming harder, not easier. ‘Healthy mind in a healthy body’ is one of the most popular slogans we have always heard; more so because it is so sensible. Both the mind and the body’s health is optimised by balancing your work life with your personal life. So here are few quick pointers that will help you maintain the most crucial balance of – work-life-study:
  • Make lists – Be organised and make lists of things to be done at work, study and home.
  • Set Goals – Set achievable goals and targets for yourself.
  • Manage your time – Plan your whole work/study week and what you have to accomplish really helps.
  • Do not Procrastinate – Do not leave things to last minute.
  • Do not succumb to pressures – There will always be work pressure. Studying will only add to the already sweltering pressures. Keep your calm. Remember that you are only a human and it is only so much you can do in a 24hour day. Divide ample time to your personal life as well after work and study.

 

Pursue your goal for higher education with Robert Kennedy College Online Masters’ Programme. Download the catalogue here: https://college.ch/catalogue?r=allcumbria&j=fbpagemt

 

Procrastination.. Saving for tomorrow…….

Normally I would have published this weekly blog couple of days ago; so what different happened this time?….. I did Procrastinate!

I had been thinking hard to come up with a relevant topic all last week, when this idea struck me suddenly, ‘This is it!’, I thought – this is something all, students and professionals, can easily relate to and deal with in their daily lives. I was smirking that I got so much to write on this topic, I will finish the blog in no time! I should start tomorrow.. I thought to myself. And here we are! 🙂

So What is Procrastination?

Dictionary
pro·cras·ti·na·tion
prəˌkrastəˈnāSH(ə)n/
noun
  1. the action of delaying or postponing something.
    “your first tip is to avoid procrastination”

Now that we have fair idea of what Procrastination means (I know, we know what it means, we live it everyday, well almost most of us..), I would like you to watch this interesting video that I found about procrastination:

Why do we procrastinate? According to Tim Urban, all of us have an instant gratification monkey within us. 🙂

Prof Pychyl says procrastination is making the choice to avoid doing something, even though we know this will cost us in the long run. He says it is different from intentionally delaying doing something, and it is not a problem of time management, but a failure to control our emotions. The problem is our brains are programmed to procrastinate.

“When we procrastinate, we are trying to improve our mood by avoiding doing something that feels unpleasant to us,” he says.

“A bit like getting drunk or comfort eating, it is a coping strategy to feel better by distracting ourselves with short-term pleasure and forgetting about a problem.”

Lecturers suffer from procrastination too, with academic Twitter feeds talking about “writing guilt” and the battle between marking papers and watching Netflix.

With more people studying online, procrastination is a greater problem than ever before. As a student studying online courses, we do postpone our assignments and research papers and even studying for exams. 

So what can we do to avoid Procrastination?

Well these are the top quick fixes that really help me get back on the track:

  1. Removing the obstacles to my task
  2. Re-aligning my focus
  3. Start from the start, no matter where I am – just dive into the task
  4. I don’t punish myself for not starting earlier….
  5. Set new realistic goals and be happy about it
  6. I tell myself that I don’t need to be perfect….it is alright to be imperfect
  7. Remove all fears about completing the task now
  8. And most importantly, I remind myself that all great people Do Procrastinate – from Steve Jobs to Frank Lloyd to Bill Clinton.

I interestingly, also found in a study that procrastination is in fact not that bad, as the procrastinators’ ideas were 28 percent more creative.

 

Do not procrastinate about your decision to study Masters. Find out more about the MBA, MSc, MA and LLMs programmes that we offer; get a catalogue now: https://college.ch/catalogue?r=allcumbria&j=fbpagemt

 

Writing Masters Level Assignments

A Master’s degree is critically different from a Bachelor’s degree. Though similar on some, Master’s degree will involve a lot of different aspects than a Bachelor’s.

At Master’s level you could be studying one of the many specialised courses offered by Robert Kennedy College, as MBA International Health Management, LLM – Master of Law International Business Law , MBA Leading Innovation and Change or Master of Science Project Management.

Taught Master’s are usually modular in form, featuring a range of optional modules the student can choose from, with a final dissertation at the end of the course, usually produced over the final semester.

Writing assignments at Master’s level

You must use language appropriate to the academic environment, and a coherent and strong structure to your work is essential. Assignments will be longer at Master’s level, even for unassessed pieces of work. Do not be overwhelmed by larger word counts. Remember, you made a large step up in intensity of work from school to university, so another step-up is well within your capabilities.

Clarity is important. Do not use over-elaborate vocabulary and grammar just because you think you have to. It is more important to be understood.

Time management is crucial for the Master’s student – with a heavier workload you will find that a good weekly plan, and a firm grasp of deadlines, is essential. This is especially true with the dissertation which will be the longest assignment you will have done yet at university, usually covering a period of several months. It is important to set yourself deadlines for drafts.

Here are the various aspects of writing skills that Master’s students should be concentrating on in order to succeed.

THE MASTERS LEVEL

One of the first things most Master’s students notice once they have started is how much more intense a Master’s degree is than an undergraduate degree. It is a less passive experience; you will not be guided as much by the lecturers, and will be expected to think for yourself more.

Master’s requires a new way of approaching academic work, all the groundwork has been done at undergraduate level. Let’s look at the features of a Master’s more closely.

ORIGINAL RESEARCH

A Master’s degree is geared towards the delivery of a piece of original research. For research Master’s students this will be your primary focus. For those doing taught Master’s this will form part of all aspects of your degree, not just the final dissertation.

In your original research you should also aim for originality where possible. You are being asked to look at your subject in a fresh and innovative way, and finding a new or underdeveloped area of your subject, or a new way of looking at an established area, will help you gain better marks.

THEORY

Master’s are not exercises in description. You will need to find a theoretical basis for your work. Many Master’s will run modules on the subject of theory, it is advisable to attend all available classes on the subject of theory as it will help you to form an idea of the theory which surrounds your subject. Theory forms a useful framework to hang your research on.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS

Another important part of Master’s writing is critical analysis. A critical analysis is one which assesses the quality and usefulness of the sources which you are using in your assignments. This process involves considering all aspects of the source and its contents.

 

Download the course catalogue here: https://college.ch/catalogue?j=fbpagemt

Value of an International degree

If you’re looking to pursue a Master’s degree and contemplating that an online course at an international university could be the right choice for you, then I’m sure you’re in the same shoes as our student ambassadors were before they started their Master’s programme with Robert Kennedy College. Have a look what they have to say after having completed their degrees:

 

“The quality of education is world class. The rewards of the programme both professionally and personally are amazing! The MBA programme was special because of the knowledge, values and experiences the international students brought with them which enriched the high level of academic training brought on by our professors. My advice would be to participate often in the class forums, ask questions and help others when they need assistance.”

Lew Figol, Chief Member Services Officer, Your Neighbourhood Credit Union

 

“When I enrolled with RKC my one aim was to achieve the Masters level Degree; however, I underestimated the value of the learning experience, which has been hugely rewarding and personally fulfilling. Further, as a result of the degree I have clearly improved the quality and quantity of my work output which has opened up new and exciting career opportunities. To be clear, obtaining your Masters is a lot of work but the rewards are well worth the effort.”
Christopher Gardner, Senior Project delivery manager, Metro Bank, MSc Financial Services Management

You are thinking of studying online but want to be sure that the degree you earn will be worth your effort.  Well, studying from a university in the UK offers you a world-class education, an internationally respected qualification, and outstanding career prospects.

Apart from the high quality and flexibility of an online programme at Robert Kennedy College, you will gain many benefits from the international exposure you will experience at an on-campus residency for a week where you will interact with people of other nationalities and cultures in an intensive learning environment.

 

The photo represents a truly international class at the Online MSc Programme

For employers, candidates with international experience offer a more rounded set of abilities. Even if such skills may be regarded by potential employers as ‘nice-to- have’ rather than essential, they can make all the difference between two otherwise similar candidates.

In short, it is imperative in today’s competitive business world to have an international degree proving to employers that you have necessary skills they demand. Apply now to gain an internationally recognised degree that can transform you and your career.

Check out all the programme information here: https://college.ch/catalogue?j=fbpagemt

 

 

Make the Most of Your RKC Experience

Graduate school programs such as an MBA can provide the advanced skills required to take a career to the next level. They not only offer academic knowledge but also peer interaction to test ideas, hone abilities and gain insights into one another’s strengths. Building and nourishing a strong academic network can form a valuable circle of influence to provide a pool of knowledge and sounding boards for challenging career moments. Academic networking can build upon the theoretical benefits of a graduate degree when applied within practical professional arenas for a lifetime of learning.

Robert Kennedy College (RKC) in Zürich, Switzerland, hosts and manages the online portion of master’s level programs. A notable advantage of the RKC combined online and residency program is the global network of professionals from several universities interacting in the online forums and Campus Café. With over 5,000 students from 130 different countries, the opportunity to build an international professional network is exceptional. These interactions are not only virtual; students also meet face-to-face while attending their residencies.

The Masters level programs bring mid- to senior- level professionals with wide ranging experience and geographical locations together. Within a traditional university, students are all living and working in the city or region. However, at RKC, students live and work in their home country, bringing their local perspectives into each discussion and lesson. Students learn how to effectively collaborate and achieve results within remote working groups. In an ever more international world, developing this flexibility is a unique skill.

Robert Kennedy College students and alumni are able to network with thousands of others opening access and creating career opportunities that otherwise may have been missed.

One example of such post academic business collaboration is Mircea Baldean, MBA, alumni from the University of Wales/Robert Kennedy College program and Carol Aebi, MBA, alumni from the University of Cumbria/Robert Kennedy College program. Carol and Mircea interacted through the RKC online forum then stayed connected after graduation. When Mircea was developing a new business idea, he tapped into his university network for validation and concept development, engaging Carol for her start-up strategic expertise. The two also partner with Gabriel, a Silicon Valley-based geospatial technologist, and their business MeetVibe, Inc. was founded. From Zurich to Toronto to San Francisco, the team works remotely but in a very cohesive and collaborative manner, a valuable skill developed through the RKC program.

RKC Alumni and MeetVibe founders – Mircea Baldean and Carol Aebi, joined by co-founder Gabriel Paun (left) at Web Summit 2017

Their app is the next evolution of social technology, creatively layering IoT interactions with market-validated social technologies into a unified platform. Last year they released the MeetVibe beta for iOS. Students from across programs joined in. Influences such as Asad Imam, Mohamud A. Verjee, Slobodan Bogovac, Joyce Njeri, and Jeremy Hewitt all provided guidance and spread the word. With a network of support, in January 2017 the beta for Android was released.

MeetVibe launched their business offer in July 2017 at the largest tech conference in Asia, and participated in the Web Summit, the biggest tech conference in the world held in Lisbon in November 2017.

Are you maximizing your professional networking opportunities and tapping into this talent pool?

It is not enough to simply collect a list of names or link social media profiles. Meaningful relationships extend beyond the online environment and are built with time and attention. Carol and Mircea’s MeetVibe app can help. Sign up today and share calendar availability and social media profiles with fellow students and alumni. Schedule a virtual meeting, call or get-together to develop valuable relationships.

Make the most of your RKC experience – build a global professional network to support your success!

Robert Kennedy College Students attend Residential Week in Cumbria

Robert Kennedy College in an exclusive partnership with the University of Cumbria, held the residency programme for our online MBA students. Held at the University of Cumbria’s picturesque Ambleside Campus, the residential week covered the module “Tackling Global-Local Challenges in Ethics, Responsibility and Sustainability.”

The residential week gave the students an opportunity to complement their online learning with a conventional classroom experience. And the diverse group of students coming together from different countries, cultures and backgrounds and professional experiences, made the week all the more enriching. The residency was attended by more than 25 international students from countries like Canada, United Arab Emirates, Nigeria and South Africa, to name just a few, for a face-to-face opportunity to enhance their learning experience.

The students participated in various activities and classroom sessions in this action-packed week as well as learning about research methodology for their dissertation. The unique experience left them feeling invigorated and inspired to put the techniques learned during the week into practice. And more importantly, the week gave them an opportunity to connect with their classmates, to forge new friendships and establish relationships with faculty and directors.

“The residential week is an integral part of the course. It’s the only chance the students get to meet one another face to face as opposed to engaging with each other online. The week is really varied. We have a number of education sessions from different guest speakers and faculty throughout the programme. We also have a number of experiential activities and we spend a day enjoying the landscape.” said Emma Watton, Senior Teaching Fellow, (Lancaster University), MBA Leadership and Sustainability Programme graduate.

Students also had the opportunity to explore the idyllic settings of the Cumbria campus and participate in various outdoor team-building activities.

Professor Jem Bendell, Director of the Institute for Leadership and Sustainability, commented, “The residency brings professionals together from around the world. We went with the students on a trail walk that William Wordsworth took and heard about his poem where he talks of letting nature be our teacher. This is something quite unique, a heritage we can explore and find ways of building that into our teaching practice”.

With students from every continent, it was a truly international experience and an opportunity to network with colleagues from all over the world. This unique learning experience left every student with lifetime memories.