Daniel Blackburn, University of Salford LL.M student, wins African Excellence Award 2022

Our students come from different walks of life. Robert Kennedy College (RKC) takes pride in being a truly international college, with over 7000 students from 140 countries.

Our 100% online programmes have been designed for busy managers. Our students and alums work for many international organisations and top companies from all over the world. 

Let me introduce one of the RKC’s proud students – Daniel Blackburn. Daniel is the owner and Managing Director of Blackburn Consulting (Pty) Limited, based in Beau Vallon, Mahe, Seychelles, and is an LLM student. Daniel is currently enrolled in the LL.M International Commercial Law programme offered by the University of Salford (UoS). Daniel chose this programme because he wanted to improve his legal knowledge to become a legal consultant and an expert witness.

Apart from balancing his busy study schedule and demanding professional life, Daniel also participated in the African Excellence Award 2022 to showcase the strength and success of his consultancy in their field of business. 

And based on various judging criteria of business performance, longevity, sustained business growth and innovation, Daniel’s firm Blackburn Consulting (Pty) Limited won the “Best Project and Contract Management Company Seychelles” award.

Thrilled with this achievement, Daniel is chuffed about the recognition and brand exposure his firm will achieve, attracting new customers and employees wanting to work with the best in the industry. 

As the winner of the “African Excellence Awards 2022”, Daniel was also invited to take part in the “Africa’s Business Heroes’ Competition”.

About his study experience with Robert Kennedy College, we asked Daniel to tell us more about a typical day as an RKC student.

Daniel has so far completed two modules with success. Each module comprised two assignments, a group assignment and an individual assignment. He devoted 15 to 20 hours per week towards his studies; however, more during his preparation for the assignments (approx. 35 hours). Daniel would spend time early in the morning for studies and then again in the evening. Daniel said, “When I wake up every day, the first thing I do is to check my inbox to see if there is any news in connection with my ongoing course, check the tutor’s posts/guidelines and other information such as classmates’ discussions and forums”. 

Daniel Blackburn with ABH logo

Regarding online learning, Daniel says RKC has an effective communication platform, allowing students to contact and receive replies from their tutors/student care/ administration. “For example, if I have any questions or clarifications on any subjects, I always contact my professors by ‘direct questions to the tutors’ or email the student care, and I usually receive the reply within 2 to 3 days.”

Further, Daniel shares that the professors/tutors are proactive course leaders and high-calibre persons. They uploaded several video lectures and a list of helpful reading materials from reputable authors to facilitate the students with their studies.

“During the discussions in forums, I was fascinated with very high-ranking classmates.

This kind of interchange with classmates in forums is fruitful and seen as reflection-on-action, that is, being open to new ideas. Through it, for example, my practice is developing and remaining vibrant. Working on a group assignment helped me learn a lot and discover my weaknesses. 

Group and individual assignments enhance my legal knowledge to tackle daily problems/situations (i.e. putting what I learned into practice).”

Based on his experience thus far, Daniel advises current and potential RKC students: 

“If you really want something, you’ll make time for it. Prioritise your time to meet your goals. Successful students always focus on the tasks at hand. No doubt time management can help students prioritize wisely and set goals correctly and a set time limit to complete all the tasks/activities.”

A truly inspirational and motivating life story of one of our students, driving success in his career. I am sure you feel inspired enough to take that plunge of investing in education, investing in your future, investing in yourself!

Chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer and the application process. For information on discounts, we might be offering at this time. 


SIX tips to help you write your master’s dissertation

For most of us, thinking about writing our dissertation can be the most stressful part of our master’s programme. Almost from the first day of the programme, you start hearing about doing the dissertation and how stressful it can be! Such talks and peer pressure are bound to add stress to the experience of doing your master’s. Additionally, not all institutions will provide you with the support and guidance you might require.

Doing your dissertation can get daunting. Photo by Redd on Unsplash.

When I was doing my dissertation for my master’s programme, I remember I got no support from my professors regarding my dissertation. In their defence, I never went to them for advice or guidance. But the point is, no one ever brought it up, and I did not feel comfortable or confident approaching anyone. I did not want to be singled out or laughed at for not knowing something. I managed with the help of my peers and a few of the senior students who had previously completed a dissertation.

While my experience was not the best, it was far from the worst. However, things are changing for the better the world over. Professors have become more approachable, and colleges and educational institutions have implemented processes to support students through their dissertation experience. I am sure most of our alums would agree that Robert Kennedy College is an excellent example of this.

The following are six tips to help you get started on writing your dissertation.

(1) Picking your topic

Narrow your focus. Photo by Paul Skorupskas on Unsplash.

Picking your topic is probably the most critical aspect of your dissertation. Everything starts from this point. However, the mistake that most of us make is in thinking that the broader or generic the topic, the easier it will be as we will be able to find information/data easily. And this is true to some extent. However, the broader your topic, the more there is to cover. Your fifteen-thousand-word dissertation could end up being a two hundred- and fifty-thousand-word book. And nobody wants that.

Get as specific as you can with your topic.

Let’s say your topic is on how a company tracks sales performance. This topic can be huge depending on the size of the company. So, get specific. Rather than tracking the sales performance of the whole company, track the company’s sales performance in a particular market/country. Then specify it some more. In this market, track the performance only for a specific channel, let’s say, online sales. By narrowing down what you will cover in your dissertation, you will have more control of your dissertation.

(2) Be organised and make lots of notes

Photo by Nick Morrison on Unsplash.

The devil is in the details. The thing about doing a dissertation spread over several months is that you could lose track of the details (by just forgetting about them). There are several tools available that can help you organise your research data, but even if you don’t use any of these tools, just create folders in your system for everything. And in each folder, create files for everything.

Maybe you could create a folder for each chapter/topic you cover and then make several files in each folder, such as a chapter draft file, a reference draft file, a notes file, etc. Have a file for everything, so you don’t forget where you got your information and why you put it down in your chapter draft file. Don’t put anything in your chapter draft file other than your draft for the chapter. Any notes, changes, or thoughts should be made a note of in your notes file and all references made in the chapter to be entered in your reference file.

This way, you know where all the information is, why you used the information and your references, and when you are finally ready to draft your master file for the dissertation, all you have to do is copy and paste from the chapter draft file.

(3) Date every version

Every time your professor or supervisor gives your feedback on your master draft file or even a chapter draft file, create a new version of the file incorporating the changes suggested. Create a separate notes file for feedback received (for the chapter draft or the master draft) and how you integrated it into your dissertation. Sometimes, a seemingly inconsequent suggestion by a professor can have a butterfly effect on your dissertation, so you must keep track of when and who gave the suggestion to track the changes.

(4) Schedule

Incorporate your dissertation into your schedule/calendar. Make sure you put aside time exclusively to work on your dissertation and stick to it. You can set deadlines by when certain parts of your dissertation must be completed and monitor your progress to ensure you can complete the dissertation on time. The longer time you have to complete your dissertation, the more milestones you can have to monitor your progress. By tracking your progress, you will not only be able to finish on time but also be less stressed during your dissertation.

(5) Reward yourself

It is essential to acknowledge your victories, even if no one else does. So, celebrate it, pat yourself on the back and maybe even reward yourself when you achieve a milestone in completing your dissertation on schedule.

(6) Review

Photo by Markus Winkler on Unsplash.

Once you have completed your chapter draft or master draft file, take a break and get away from your dissertation for a couple of days. Then come back and read and review the file carefully. You will be surprised by how many mistakes you will find in the draft. You might have overlooked simple things when typing or reading the draft immediately after finishing. You might have thought you had written it a certain way, and your mind would have filled in the gaps to look like you wrote it the way you thought. So, get away from the draft for a short period, then once you get back, edit before you submit it.


Hopefully, these six tips will help you get started on your dissertation. If you have any other tips that might help our readers improve their dissertation and how they work towards it, please share them here.

If you have been thinking about doing either a BA, MBA, MSc or LLM degree, and are ready to challenge yourself, look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing. 

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.