Student Testimonials – Johannes’s Truly Inspirational Story!

This week we bring you the truly inspirational story of Johannes from South Africa; a story which I personally found to be heart warming and one that motivates me to do something better in my life, everyday.

Johannes, a BA graduate and a Banker decided to pursue MA in Leading Innovation and Change (MALIC). One reason was that it is a well known Online Programme offered by the Robert Kennedy College in Switzerland. Another reason was that it was offered in partnership with York St John University in York, England, which he believes is one of the best countries for a special needs student.

Johannes graduated recently and it was a proud moment for him and his wife who commended his dedication throughout the course. He now intends to continue for a PhD.

As Johannes says, “At York, I was not just a number. The University was always eager to help”. Watch Johannes’s story and get motivated!

Success Story from South Africa

Download the catalogue to find out more about the programme, fees, start dates and eligibility criteria.

Make the possible happen

We are proud to announce the launch of the New Mobile App for York St John University. The launch follows the recent announcement by RKC of its another mobile app for the University of Cumbria.

The mobile app enables us to connect better and easier with prospective students. The Mobile App is a comprehensive tool developed to provide important information at your fingertips. This includes the programmes offered, module description, fees, duration and FAQs. And for an application submitted through the App, the application fee is waived! This user-friendly App is available to download on both Android and iOS devices.

Check out official York St John University website to find out more details about the mobile app.

You can download the app at: 

Androidhttps://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=swiss.rkc.yorkmba

Apple iOS https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/york-mba/id1468315778

Connect to us on our New Mobile App!

This is an exciting time for us at Robert Kennedy College! We envision and strive to provide world class Masters Education and exceptional student service. We like to be connected to our prospective students and give you all information you need to know about your Master’s programme, at your fingertips!

So, quite literally, we got everything at your fingertips and are happy to announce the launch of the new Mobile App for University of Cumbria. This user friendly App is available to download on both Android and iOS devices.

The Mobile App is a comprehensive tool giving you all information you could ask for; from courses offered, fees, duration, FAQs, and you can Apply through the App as well. You cannot wish for a simpler and quicker life than this!

Here is the snapshot of how the App looks:

You can download the app athttps://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=swiss.rkc.cumbria
or for iphone https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/unicumbria/id1464904297?mt=8

Download now and start sharing with your friends!

Women in Higher Education – The History and The Future

Dear Readers, I am going to present this blog as a two part series. This week, in Part 1, I reflect and reminisce through the long history of women’s education. In the impending blog, we will explore how the history unfolded and revolutionised in the 21st century of Online Learning.

I feel blessed and grateful to my parents who stressed upon the importance of education and always encouraged me to attain higher levels of education. As a young girl, primary education came but naturally to me. Equal opportunities and maybe better than my brother, were provided to ensure I receive quality formal and university education. But this has not always been the case back in the history of women’s education. As a woman, today I feel grateful to those who fought for, liberalised movement and demanded rights rather than asking for concessions.

Medieval, Early Modern Period and Georgian time : There were not many educational opportunities back in the medieval times. The education was mainly the responsibility of the Church or the families themselves. Girls were usually not the part of education system run by monks and nuns unless the girls wanted to become nuns themselves. Family system though seem to include girls, however only so they could lead their households successfully in future. Early modern period saw some freedom by consequence of education. The Georgian time resiled back to limited scope and avenues for women’s education. It was the time when despite increasing literacy rates and supporting movements like bluestocking movement; the concept of ‘separate spheres’ began gaining momentum. It meant segregating roles of men and women, with men incharge of the outside work world and women responsible for family upbringing and household.

The Victorian era: With the advent of Industrial Age, increasing number of men went seeking mechanical, trades and techinical education. There was n increasing pressure from women as well around the time to provide them equal opportunities and avenues of education. New educational institutions, founded by influential women, sprung up like Cheltenham Ladies’ College in 1853, and Roedean School in 1885. Also establishment of Education Act in 1880, laid the foundation of compulsory and free primary education. Not only did formal education advanced, women got free reign in University Education in Victorian era. In 1878, University of London became first university in the UK to award degrees to women.

The Women’s Liberation Movement: The women’s liberation movement (WLM) was a political alignment of women and feminist intellectualism that emerged in the late 1960s and continued into the 1980s primarily in the industrialized nations of the Western world, which affected great change (political, intellectual, cultural) throughout the world. Women’s Liberation Movement as a whole was much aided by the opportunities offered to a post-war generation of girls who had been able to get into the grammar school system, and the opportunities offered to them at these schools. The Women’s Liberation Movement held a series of conferences around the country to demand equal pay, equal educational and job opportunities, and legal and financial independence from men, among other things.


University of Cumbria ranked 28th in 2019 WhatUni Student Choice Rankings

It is with great honour that Robert Kennedy College announces that our partner university, the University of Cumbria, has been ranked 28th out of 131institutions in this year’s UK WhatUnisurvey results table. The University of Cumbria has marked a consistent improvement in its rankings over the last couple of years, moving up the ranking by 67 places in the last two years itself. 

One of the key differentiators that separates the UK WhatUni survey results from other rankings is that it is solely driven by the opinion of current students and not historical data.  Demonstrating sustained improvements in student experience over the last five years, the university’s ranking has risen annually since 2015 – from 112th in 2015 to today’s 28th position – as has its overall point score (3.51 in 2015 to 4.17 in 2019).

For the WhatUni Student Choice Awards, students give their university an overall star rating of one to five; those results are averaged to create overall ratings (out of five stars) for each university across eight categories of student experiences.  Existing students also write a review of their university experience which helps future students find the right university for them. Other key headline figures include the universities’ overall score increasing from 4.1 in 2018 to 4.17 this year. In terms of categories, the University of Cumbria improved in seven of the eight areas with course and lecturers and the Students’ Union seeing the biggest rise in rankings. The university continues to score well in job prospects and student support.

Through our exclusive partnership with the University of CumbriaRobert Kennedy Collegeis proud to contribute to the continued success of the university and heartily congratulate the university, staff and faculty of their success thus far and wish them continued success in the future.

Fear of Failure

In life, on several occasions, the real-world situation unfolds in an entirely different manner than what we are advised or we envision it would. We are taught to be leaders, be confident and be certain of every action we take. Of the several traits and qualities of being a competent leader, we are taught to be fearless. However, the fear of failure is an all-pervasive part of the human psyche. Failure is defined as the ‘lack of success’. Lack of which induces a feeling of paucity, in turn further inducing the ‘fear of failure’ in the future endeavours.

“Failure is so important. We speak about success all the time. It is the ability to resist failure or use failure that often leads to greater success. I’ve met people who don’t want to try for fear of failing.” – J.K. Rowling

Fear can adversely affect one’s ability to do things, confidence  and willingness to face any challenges that arise. We are afraid of deploying any ingenious methods, stemming out of the reluctance of taking even minor risks. We fear not only of the outcomes, but also of the deemed image; especially when one is at a leadership position.

“Failure isn’t fatal, but failure to change might be” – John Wooden

Fear cripples the progress and creativity. Change is inevitable and one must embrace the change and advance with valour. First, we must create an environment in which failure is not ridiculed or shamed but encouraged. Teams should strive for a culture rooted in trust because it grants the members a greater capacity for innovation

 “It’s failure that gives you the proper perspective on success.” – Ellen DeGeneres

 

Second, we must not be risk-aversive. Once we are surrounded by those who are more accepting of failure, we can encourage and pursue taking risks early. Fail hard, and fail fast.

 “When you take risks you learn that there will be times when you succeed and there will be times when you fail, and both are equally important.” – Ellen DeGeneres

By taking risks early on, we contrive plans to embrace larger repercussions, and the confidence bolstered in those unconventional decisions, results in greater achievement.

Reflection session

Reflection session

Now taking risk not always commensurates to the need of the hour. Planning the ‘next step’ and thinking ahead is vital. Risks come with only a chance of success, and sometimes the odds are not in our favor.

 “You build on failure. You use it as a stepping stone. Close the door on the past. You don’t try to forget the mistakes, but you don’t dwell on it. You don’t let it have any of your energy, or any of your time, or any of your space.” – Johnny Cash

We can instead redirect our efforts on what to do next. We encourage this outlook to prevent plateauing personal growth with negative emotion, which also has a high chance of affecting the team’s performance and our future level of contribution.

Finally,

“Failure should be our teacher, not our undertaker. Failure is delay, not defeat. It is a temporary detour, not a dead end. Failure is something we can avoid only by saying nothing, doing nothing, and being nothing.” – Denis Waitley

 

Do not let fear come in your way to advance your studies. Talk to our advisor today about the courses offered online and get your customised study-plan.

 

Organisational Behaviour and its Importance in Management

“There are only two ways to influence human behaviour: you can manipulate it or you can inspire it” – Simon Sinek, Author, Motivational Speaker and Marketing Consultant

Understanding why people behave the way they do and studying the complex nature of human being in an organisation is important to better manage and increase the value of the human capital in an organisation. Organisational Behaviour helps us understand this by studying the cause and effect of human behaviour within an organisation.

Some of the reasons why Organisational Behaviour is an integral part of most management programmes is as follows:

  1. Understanding the relationship between an organisation and its employees: The study of Organisational Behaviour helps in the better understanding of the relationship between an organisation and its employees thereby helping in the development of better Human Resource strategies in creating a better work environment, employee loyalty and increasing the overall value of the human capital for the organisation.
  2. Motivating employees: Studying Organisational Behaviour help managers to better understand their employees and motivate them, applying different motivational tools as per individual requirements resulting in the better performance of the organisation as a whole.
  3. Improving industrial/ labour relations: Organisational Behaviour help in understanding the cause of a problem, predict its future course and control its consequences. As a result, managers are able to maintain better relations with their employees by nipping any problem in the bud.
  4. Effective utilisation of Human Resource: Knowledge of Organisational Behaviour help managers to effectively and efficiently manage their employees, inspiring and motivating them to higher efficiency and productivity through a better understanding and analysis of human behaviour.
  5. Predicting human behaviour: This is probably the most important reason for studying Organisational Behaviour in management. Knowledge of Organisational Behaviour prepares students to become better managers by becoming a student of human behaviour from a management perspective and thereby contributing to organisational effectiveness and profitability.

Robert Kennedy College with almost 14,000 students from almost every county in the world offers one of the most diverse, accredited and globally recognised online master’s degree programmes in both Business Law, Leadership and Management through exclusive partnerships with British universities. For more information download programme catalogue.

Future of Healthcare professionals

HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY – STA·TUS QUO

Demand for healthcare services has unobtrusively risen over a period of time now and this growth will continue into the future. The demand for services translates into ever-increasing demand for healthcare workers – including nurses, physicians, allied health professionals, technologists and coders, leaders, and support personnel. Like any other industry, it’s an upward trend in the long term, for the healthcare sector employment. However, the healthcare industry does not seem to be prepared enough to cater to this increasing workforce demand. Increasing demand has been accompanied by a growing number of unfilled jobs, a serious challenge that can be perceived in the federal labor data and on the digital job boards of hospitals and health systems, where hundreds and even thousands of open jobs are posted. Both growth trends and growth challenges will continue into 2018 and beyond.

WHERE IS THE FUTURE?

The amount of money that is projected to be spent on healthcare in the future, is cogent indicator of rising demand for healthcare services and healthcare workers. More than doubling from 2010 to 2025, when it reaches beyond $55 trillion, expenditures include payments for all healthcare costs, including pharmaceuticals, equipment and technology. However, labor constitutes the single greatest cost for most healthcare organisations.

This growing trend, has translated into a flurry of jobs openings in the healthcare sector. Even in 2017, despite the continued debate over the future of healthcare policy, the healthcare industry has added an average of 24,000 jobs each month. That’s vigorous growth in any industry. Employment growth is expected to continue for the foreseeable future. While healthcare job growth will ebb and flow in the future, the trajectory of growth has been consistently upward.

HOW CAN YOU FIT IN THE DEMAND SUPPLY GAP?

While job openings have ascended steadily over the years, the job hires remained relatively static. Traditionally openings have outpaced job hires in healthcare and the gap between openings and hires has been widening rapidly since 2014. This swelling gap – which represents a cumulative number of unfilled jobs – shows the challenges that healthcare providers face in finding enough practitioners and support personnel to fill today’s job openings. Other data reveals that the problem of high demand for healthcare workers, and low supply of those workers, may continue well into the future. The statistics on the projected future job openings  provides the healthcare providers the crucial insight on the demand for healthcare services and healthcare professionals. These are the jobs that healthcare providers will need to fill in the future.

At Robert Kennedy College, we offer Online MBA International Healthcare Management Programme, in exclusive partnership with University of Cumbria, UK. Recognise the workforce shortage in the healthcare sector and be there where there are abundant jobs. The MBA IHM could prove be the key to your success and better future. Click here to receive the course catalogue and get a chance for free trial offers.

Procrastination.. Saving for tomorrow…….

Normally I would have published this weekly blog couple of days ago; so what different happened this time?….. I did Procrastinate!

I had been thinking hard to come up with a relevant topic all last week, when this idea struck me suddenly, ‘This is it!’, I thought – this is something all, students and professionals, can easily relate to and deal with in their daily lives. I was smirking that I got so much to write on this topic, I will finish the blog in no time! I should start tomorrow.. I thought to myself. And here we are! 🙂

So What is Procrastination?

Dictionary
pro·cras·ti·na·tion
prəˌkrastəˈnāSH(ə)n/
noun
  1. the action of delaying or postponing something.
    “your first tip is to avoid procrastination”

Now that we have fair idea of what Procrastination means (I know, we know what it means, we live it everyday, well almost most of us..), I would like you to watch this interesting video that I found about procrastination:

Why do we procrastinate? According to Tim Urban, all of us have an instant gratification monkey within us. 🙂

Prof Pychyl says procrastination is making the choice to avoid doing something, even though we know this will cost us in the long run. He says it is different from intentionally delaying doing something, and it is not a problem of time management, but a failure to control our emotions. The problem is our brains are programmed to procrastinate.

“When we procrastinate, we are trying to improve our mood by avoiding doing something that feels unpleasant to us,” he says.

“A bit like getting drunk or comfort eating, it is a coping strategy to feel better by distracting ourselves with short-term pleasure and forgetting about a problem.”

Lecturers suffer from procrastination too, with academic Twitter feeds talking about “writing guilt” and the battle between marking papers and watching Netflix.

With more people studying online, procrastination is a greater problem than ever before. As a student studying online courses, we do postpone our assignments and research papers and even studying for exams. 

So what can we do to avoid Procrastination?

Well these are the top quick fixes that really help me get back on the track:

  1. Removing the obstacles to my task
  2. Re-aligning my focus
  3. Start from the start, no matter where I am – just dive into the task
  4. I don’t punish myself for not starting earlier….
  5. Set new realistic goals and be happy about it
  6. I tell myself that I don’t need to be perfect….it is alright to be imperfect
  7. Remove all fears about completing the task now
  8. And most importantly, I remind myself that all great people Do Procrastinate – from Steve Jobs to Frank Lloyd to Bill Clinton.

I interestingly, also found in a study that procrastination is in fact not that bad, as the procrastinators’ ideas were 28 percent more creative.

 

Do not procrastinate about your decision to study Masters. Find out more about the MBA, MSc, MA and LLMs programmes that we offer; get our catalogue now.

Considerations for choosing a business degree program

It’s a competitive world today and education is a key to success for many. Therefore, choosing a promising degree program is vital to ensure a promising career. As a prospective student, what factors affect your decision of pursuing masters and choice of the course?

 

I studied this survey by mba.com Prospective Students Survey Report* and found it interesting in understanding the key aspects of candidate behaviors and preferences in selection of a graduate business programme. The Survey Report explores the business school pipeline from the prospective students’ point of view, analyzing motivations, intended career outcomes, and program choices shared by 10,017 prospective students in 2015.

UNDERSTANDING THE MINDSET

Professional MBA candidates have the most work experience and are most likely to continue working while pursuing their degree. They want to gain more respect and recognition in the workplace and advance professionally to the next level through promotions and salary increases. They are more driven by information that shows how a program can fit into their life (e.g., distance to work/home, class format, and schedules)

QUALITY MORE IMPORTANT THAN COST

Two-thirds of prospective students are determined to get into the best school possible, so quality and reputation of program are top school selection factors. Prospective students weigh the quality and reputation of a program more heavily than they do financial aspects; however, total costs are among the top three factors they consider.

 

CAREER GOALS POST QUALIFICATION

Students deciding to enroll in a graduate business program typically have three general career goals in mind for their postgraduate employment: 1) continue on their current career path, 2) switch careers, or 3) start a business.

 

 

INCENTIVE TO CONSIDER BUSINESS DEGREE

Three in four (77%) prospective students first considered business school because of a special event or trigger. The most common event is when a candidate starts a search for a new job and realizes he or she lacks the necessary knowledge, skills, or abilities to be competitive for the position they seek.

At RKC we bring you the best of both worlds, flexibility of online learning with the benefits of traditional learning environment and networking.

Begin the journey of your Masters here and enrol for you dream Online MBA qualification.

 

*The mba.com Prospective Students Survey is a product of the Graduate Management Admission Council® (GMAC®), a global nonprofit education organization of leading graduate business schools and the owner of the Graduate Management Admission Test® (GMAT®).