5 reasons you feel stuck in your career

From early childhood, we start idolising people – our parents, grandparents, teachers, aunts and uncles, pop stars, a pilot, cops or firefighters. As soon as we are old enough to understand what each person around us does for a living, we start either liking or disliking it. Subconsciously, our minds begin making choices about which ‘profession’ we would like to venture into and which we dislike. We are also groomed (or maybe forced in some cases) to choose a career path that is traditionally high paying and secure.

But eventually, I guess we all choose something that we like doing or that we are good at.

I know I could just end the blog here and say ‘happily ever after’ went our careers. But sometimes, no matter how wisely we choose a career or job for ourselves, there may arise a standpoint when you start feeling stuck in that job. In simple words, feeling stuck in a situation where you seem not to be able to leave your present job but feel highly dissatisfied with work. The same mundane tasks you have mastered over the years do not offer any more learning or excitement, and you do not look forward to going to work.

While there can be numerous reasons why you may be feeling stuck at work, in my opinion, here are the top 5 reasons that might resonate with you:

1. Accepting a job role without understanding it entirely

At the time, you may have felt this job role was appropriate for you, something you always dreamt of doing. But eventually, you realise the position is much more or much less than you expected. The role does not fit like a glove but, in actuality, feels like a noose.

2.  $$$$ ruled

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When you signed on for the job, it offered a lucrative signing bonus with stock options and an unbelievable year-end bonus! It was too good to be true, and it was irresistible. It’s only when you started the job and over time that you realised the downside of all the ‘extra’ money you received. You might not feel that the money is not worth the time and effort you must put in. The work-life balance has only become a topic for discussion as you have not experienced a day without stress and pressure at work.

3. Outdated skillset

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Many people will agree that they achieve job satisfaction from not just the salaries and bonuses they receive, but greater satisfaction is realised when they see their meaningful contributions resulting in higher profits, efficiency, or global expansions. A continuous learning curve is a high point for many people to feel happy in their careers. If this is lacking and you think your skills are becoming redundant, dissatisfaction starts sinking in. You may feel worthless and lose confidence eventually in your skillset.

4. Not enough recognition at work

This is another factor that makes you feel stuck at work. Your work is not recognised, and your boss has been fending the next promotion and increment questions you have been asking for. Even after mastering the work and putting in time and effort, your job does not seem rewarding anymore.

5. Fear factor

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Change is not everyone’s cup of tea. Everyone is afraid of the unknown. Stagnation happens when you are fearful of making a move. You may be applying for a new job, but inside, you know you are stuck in the current job and unable to move. Not receiving any favourable response from job search also reinstates the lingering fear.

Our career is one of the most important aspects of our lives. Most of us spend the majority of our time, say 8-10 hours, at our jobs out of the 24 hours. You can follow a few simple steps to overcome this situation of feeling stuck at work. Stay tuned and check out this space for my next blog, five easy steps to break free and get unstuck in your career!

6 questions to ask before deciding to do an online Master’s Degree programme

Deciding whether to do a master’s degree is a tough decision, and in some cases, it might even be an inevitable decision.

It is a tough decision if you have been out of the school environment for a few years – getting back to school can be challenging. You might have a family of your own, and from experience, I know it is a significant financial and time commitment. Then there are the pressures and deadlines you have to meet at your job, and I am sure there are many other personal obstacles unique to the individual. And the decision becomes inevitable as it is one of the options available to help you continue to grow – as a person and in your career.

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So, when is the right time to do a master’s degree programme? I can’t answer that for you, but the following are six points to consider that might help you make an informed decision.

1. Passion for the subject

With so many distractions and commitments vying for your attention, if you choose to do a programme that you have little interest in studying, chances are, it will be pushed right to the bottom of the list of your priorities. You will end up taking very little away from the programme and might end up performing poorly in your evaluations and even failing the course.

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I suggest you choose a subject you are passionate about, something you want to learn. Your interest will naturally result in you putting in the effort to learn and will result in better overall performance in your evaluations.

2. Relevance of the subject

For most working professionals, time is precious. So, there has to be a reason for every extra calicular thing you plan on doing. If you intend to do a master’s degree and are not passionate about the subject, then the next best option (or even the primary option) is choosing a programme that will benefit you professionally. Something that adds knowledge to what you are already doing professionally or, at the very least, helps your growth in your career.

3. Are you a self-starter?

Unlike an on-campus programme where you are physically present in class on a daily basis, guided every step of the way by a professor and closely interact with other students. In an online programme, you are in the driver’s seat; the onus is up to you to complete assignments on time, put time aside to study regularly, and take the initiative to do all you can to complete the programme successfully.  

But this does not mean you will not have any support. At least in the case of Robert Kennedy College, with our online campus and library, online forums, live classroom sessions, student care and last but not least, the online residency, you will have lots of support in completing the programme!

4. Accreditation and Recognition

If you are going to do an online master’s degree, then make sure the degree you earn has value. Find out:

  • Which university will award the degree?
  • What is the reputation of the university?
  • How is the university accredited?

These are just three questions to help you get started. Think of more relevant questions, and don’t be afraid to ask.

Want to know more about the universities we have an exclusive partnership with? Click here to learn more!

5. Is it all a façade?

You have to know what you are signing up for? Is the college just going to give you some online study material and then wash their hands off you? Ask:

  • Who are going to be your teachers?
  • Is there trial access you can have to get a feel of how the programme is run?
  • Can you talk with current students or alumni to get feedback?
  • How are the evaluations done?
  • What are the modules involved in the programme?

Again, these are just a few questions to help you get started.

At Robert Kennedy College, you can Chat Live on WhatsApp with our Education Advisors and ask all your questions, ask them about our programmes and our key faculty members, open a trial account to access our OnlineCampus or request to connect with our alumni.

6. Fees

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Finally, the fees – is the programme something that you can financially handle? What are the payment terms? Does the company you are employed with have a sponsorship programme?


These points are just six simple tips to help you ask the right questions before joining an online master’s degree programme. Please share any other questions you deemed necessary to help you make an informed decision.

If you are ready to apply for one of our programmes, click here.