Student Interview: Women in RKC – Darija Barrech

In one of our most popular blog series featuring our female students, we asked our students to share their experiences with us – the challenges of getting back to school, managing work and study along with family, and the unique challenges they faced being female students.

Darija is a graduate of our MA programme in Leading Innovation and Change (MALIC) through our exclusive partnership with York St John University, UK. This programme has been discontinued and reincarnated as a 100% online MBA programme in Leading Innovation and Change

“The MALIC program was the enabler to put all the puzzle pieces together that I had acquired in my working life. It made all things very logical and made me understand all the interactions even better.

I enjoyed the learning journey a lot! Since it is an online course, I really liked the freedom to learn in my pace and time.

The residency week was just great! Not only the learning but the people made it very special! It was wonderful to meet new friends from all over the world.

I cannot imagine any program to be more international than MALIC is! This aspect brings in fantastic personalities and perspectives.

Thank you to all who made this learning such a fun journey!”

Darija Barrech, Managing Director – Culcha gmbh, Zurich, Switzerland and an alumnus of Robert Kennedy College
Darija Barrech, Managing Director – Culcha gmbh, Zurich, Switzerland and an alumnus of Robert Kennedy College

An Introduction

Who are you, really (How do you define yourself? Professionally, personally?)?

My home is where my heart is. That describes me quite well. I am 1 of 4 children of my Croatian mother and my Pakistani father. I was born in Germany and grew up in Pakistan. At 15, I returned to Germany for further education. So maybe now you know why I ended up in HR :). I love people, I breathe change, I innovate, and I am culture… After heading HR for a multinational medical device company, I wanted to give some “fresh air” to my brain. I had been looking for a program for over a year. After completing MALIC, I founded my own company (www.culcha.world), where I consult organisations in the area of organisational culture, leadership and change. Since August 2017, I have been a mom of our daughter Aviva which is another BIG learning and blessing in life. For almost 10 years, my husband and I have been living in Switzerland – which is a lovely and beautiful country.

Getting back to education

Photo by Scott Webb on Unsplash.

Your story of getting back to do a Master’s degree

What was the driving force behind your enrolling for an online degree? Who inspired you? What motivated you?

After heading HR for a multinational medical device company, I wanted to give some “fresh air” to my brain. I had been looking for a program for over a year. My husband, who saw an advertisement for the MALIC program in an aeroplane magazine, made me aware of it. The program was THE PERFECT FIT for me. It was blended, and the topics were spot on.

What were the thoughts/situations/people/challenges holding you back from starting (if any)? How did you overcome them?

Nothing.

What surprised you the most when you started your studies?

One thing I had never anticipated or thought of while looking for a good program was the mix of students. We were around 40 students in my cohort and “only” 4 where from Europe – the others coming from all over the world! I really made friends for life!

Do you feel there are unique challenges women face when deciding to get back into education?

When I started MALIC, I was without children but in a challenging job. From today´s perspective, I can imagine starting a program like MALIC could be very challenging in terms of time capacity (if you have children). Of course, like everything in life, it’s a question of priorities. Another thought might be in the direction of other national/geographical cultures… I could imagine that women in certain geographies might have the wish to conduct such a program but do not have the financial or family backing to do so.

Getting the degree

Photo by Mohammad Shahhosseini on Unsplash.

The work to get the degree – what did you learn, how did you balance, what would you do differently

Which programme did you do? Why?

MALIC, the program was THE PERFECT FIT for me. It was blended and the topics where spot on. I liked the focus on change, leadership, culture, strategy and innovation.

What is the single most important thing you learned during the programme?

That I can learn everything, I want!

How did you balance work and studies?

Discipline and backing from my husband.

Any particular challenges to being a woman and studying online, or do you think all students face the same ones?

I do not see any particular challenges women face other than in time and/or culture/geography.

Life post-degree

Photo by Christopher Gower on Unsplash.

What changed, if anything?

What’s new in your life since graduating/starting your studies? Any visible impact already?

I feel very sure and am very curious about the topics. I still keep learning.

Anything you are doing differently now because of the things you learned?

My way of learning has changed. I have been more academic-driven since MALIC. I more often consult studies when evaluating a topic.

Do you feel that getting a Master’s degree or doing other online programmes can reduce gender discrimination in the workplace?

I don’t think it can.

Advice for other women

Or other students, really.

Imagine you could send a message back in time to your pre-degree self: what would it be?

Why didn’t I do it earlier?!

Imagine you could send an object back in time to your pre-degree self: what would it be?

My MALIC Degree 🙂

Closing thoughts

Anything else you would like to add that could help with the goal of increasing women’s participation/access to a Master’s degree?

Completing MALIC was not only fun and smooth due to the topics, but it just gave me so many AHA moments and it clicked so many things I knew from practical work. It was THE BEST thing to do for me! Of course it is not easy doing such a program next to full time work, family, kids,…. BUT it is worth every minute spend. Professionally I grew by doing MALIC. I founded my own company (www.culcha.world) where I consult organisations in the areas of culture, leadership and change. While being on the residency week in York, we had the opportunity to see the graduates (a year above us). This picture was THE motivator for me to continue and keep on learning when times got tougher.


If this blog has motivated you to challenge yourself and do a master’s degree, then have a look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a RKC’s master’s student – Tomislava

Through the #DILO series of blog posts, we have been bringing you insights into the life of our master’s students, sharing their thoughts and opinions, ups and downs, and key learning points during their online studies. The whole idea behind this series is to make you aware of the realities of online studies and aid you in decision making.   

This week we take a look  at a day in the life of one of our master’s degree student, Tomislava. Here are a few insights and some words of wisdom that Tomislava has to share from her own experience:  

There is no better way to learn than from those who came before and see if what worked for them. It will help you become a better student and, hopefully, help you make an informed decision.

Tomislava is a mother of 3 kids and works as an assistant in emergency team at WHO

An Introduction

Who are you?

My name is Tomislava B and I am a mother of 3 kids, 8, 15 and 17. I work at WHO and as a assistant in emergency team who today are fighting the Covid-19 by supplying to the countries in need several essential items like Oxygen, masks, etc. and sending off different vaccines, medicine to be used in solidarity trials in testing and, so much more.

Which programme did you choose and why?

University of Cumbria’s MBA International Healthcare Management programme. I have been offered a job in WHO and I thought it would be good to learn on the subject.

The Study Plan

Photo by Jessica Lewis on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I worked in the evenings. I would block minimum 3 hours, reading a lot and getting all information by searching on the subject that I was studying. I did not have any experience, so it was all very new to me . I read every message and comments by students. That helped me a lot. Also asking a lot of questions.😀.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

I used to study in the evenings during the week and part of the day in the weekend. But mainly evenings for there were no distractions at that time of the day..

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

Once I would start a topic, I worked on it from the first day without leaving it in the middle. The time was precious, and working and studying at the same time was a great challenge. I also used my lunch time at work for looking what was taught and took few notes. I would do brainstorming by marking on the paper anything that will be useful for my writing.

Travelling and Communication

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

If travelling, I used to take all with me. All my books were online and when I was not travelling, I used my electronics notes. For anything that would come in my thoughts, I would pen it down.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

Evening time worked the best for me. We also formed a WhatsApp group and we could discuss any questions there. Also it was nice to hear different experiences and feedback.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online master’s student look like for you?

Getting up for the day, with books all over the place.😀. But, not a mess, as I arranged piles of books by unit and by subject in a very organised manner. I made a pile with different notes by period as to were I was in the writing. It was like building up something slowly but surely the final work was visible. Or like a song strophes by strophes 🎶 .

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Yes! One has to be very organised and never put anything down for tomorrow. Imagine you are making a wall and you have given yourself a goal to do let’s say half a meter. And you are ready but some other staff comes with more interesting things to do like to go out for a drink with a friend. And you say ok I will do it tomorrow. Tomorrow comes and what is going on? You have not started! You have to do everything that you were going to do yesterday and all that has been added today. You will find it very hard and will not be able to manage the way you would have done, if you had done a little part from yesterday and the part for today. It will demotivate you and tomorrow you will doubt etc.

So stay on track and do little by little but every day . Read everything and comments given by professor and by classmates is something not to be ignored! You will see that any question you have, you will find an answer in the precious discussions.


We at Robert Kennedy College are here to support you through the entire process and encourage you to get in touch with our team of Education Advisors and chat with them Live on WhatsApp if you have any questions about our programmes, fee structure, the application process, or details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

If you have already made up your mind and are ready to apply, then just click here.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Tahera Sultana

Continuing with our series of blogs that answer some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get asked frequently by students looking to join one of our online programmes. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

Let’s learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student!

Be disciplined and prepared to devote time and energy to the course.

Tahera Sultana

An Introduction

Photo by Vladislav Klapin on Unsplash.

Who are you?

Hi, my name is Tahera Sultana (it means pure). I am female, married with no children. I am also a Compliance Officer and have worked for different financial institutions for more than 20 years.

Which programme did you choose and why?

I am studying the Master of Laws (LLM) programme. I have been working in the compliance field for over twenty years, and I find more of my colleagues and subordinates are law graduates. I thought to myself, if I pursue a law degree, I could enhance my knowledge grow beyond being a Compliance Officer.

The Study Plan

Photo by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I am a full-time employee and a part-time student. Before starting a module, I will understand the module requirement that I am about to enrol. Each week, I print out all presentation material and listen to the recorded lecture; I make my notes and review the lecture a few times until I can digest the topic. I spent approximately one hour per week on lectures and 2-3 hours reading time for the required chapter in the module.

I spent most of the time working on my given assignment. The research process takes up to 10 hours. After reading the related material, I will start writing the paper. As I have done three modules so far in the programme, writing time takes up to 5-6 hours per 1,000 words. As a full-time employee, I work on my assignment in the evening and during the weekend. Assignment time is not an easy task for me, but a very fruitful experience. I enjoy writing on meaningful and interesting topics.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

I had no choice in choosing my study time. For me, after work is the most suitable time to study. If I had a choice, I would have chosen early mornings to do my studies. For the most part, weekends are not good for me because I work from Monday to Friday, from 9:00 am to 7:30 pm (normal office hours is 9 to 6, but in Hong Kong, we have unofficial long working hours). Over the weekend, I go hiking and spend time with my family. If I have to complete an assignment, I will work extra hours during the week to meet the deadline. I will also skip hiking and family time to achieve the goal.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

Every 1000 words will take me approximately 5-6 hours of writing time. I devote approximately 20 to 22 hours to each assignment (excluding research & reading material).

Travelling and Communication

The challenges of learning while travelling. Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash.

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

I find it very hard to study if I have to travel. I may skip one weeks’ lecture and catch up in the coming weeks, i.e., after my business travel. If I have to submit an assignment during my travel, I carry all my research material onto the aircraft and work during the flight. I remember, it was late Jan 2020, I had to fly from Hong Kong to London; I worked 10 hours on the flight. Fortunately, I had three hours of sleep during that trip.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

Interacting with peers and professors is no big deal in these modules. We have once or twice zoom / Blue Jean meetings in each module. I am not concerned about the time difference, as I am in Asia; 3:00 pm London/Swiss time is 9:00 pm Hong Kong time. That suits me, for I can join after office hours. However, when I am travelling, there will be a problem with the change in the time difference, and I might end up missing the meeting. At one time I remember I used my computer in the hotel during my business trip to interact with the whole class; I could not hear clearly what they were discussing due to hotel Wi-Fi.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

I find myself glad that there is an online course that I can take advantage of. I can still work as a full-time employee and study during my off-hours, although it is not an easy task when there is travelling involved. I take pride in my decision to gain a Master’s degree; I understand that hard work is needed, and I know this will help me progress and enhance to the next level.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Be disciplined and prepared to devote time and energy to the course. Know that all classmates are your partners, and the professors are very experienced and are there to help you succeed. I am glad that I made a good choice to achieve my Master’s degree.


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and for details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

Robert Kennedy College and York St John University Graduation – Class of 2021

For most of us, isolation has been a big part of the last couple of years. There are a lot of unique opportunities and experiences that we have missed out on because of the lockdowns and limited travel options. Because of COVID-19 protocols, many universities had suspended graduation ceremonies, resulting in many students missing out on the “cherry on the cake” and not being able to experience the graduation ceremony. 

Last week York St John University celebrated their students by conducting the graduation ceremony at York Minster. Thirty-four proud Robert Kennedy College students also attended the graduation ceremony to receive their degree certificates.

Group photo of RKC Class of 2021 Graduation @YorkStJohn, with a few friends from other colleges

The ceremony was a happy occasion for the graduating students who worked hard to earn their master’s degrees. They celebrated it with their fellow students, the faculty and their families. To celebrate the occasion the Mayor and Sheriff of York were also present.

RKC students can be seen getting the award at 45.17, 54.47 and 59.53

If you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree, and are ready to challenge yourself, look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

If you have already made up your mind, click here to apply.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Premprakash

Sometimes, the fear of the unknown is more of a hindrance in achieving your end goal. Once you are past this fear and are well informed, it is just a matter of planning your path. Similar is the plight of students who want to study of online but face the fear of the unknown, such as : What is the best way to study online? Should you do an online programme? How to better manage time when learning online? And so on. 

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

These are all questions that we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get regularly asked by students looking to join one of our online programmes. Undertaking to do an online master’s degree programme will be an additional commitment to your time and finances, and it is wise to get information beforehand.

Through this continuing series of blog posts, some of our past and current students have shared their experiences, thoughts and opinions and given their feedback on handling some of these choices and situations. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

This time we have an alumnus from the University of Cumbria and Robert Kennedy College, MBA Leadership & Sustainability programme, Premprakash. 

An Introduction

Which Uni are you studying with?

University of Cumbria

Which programme did you choose and why?

MBA Leadership & Sustainability

The Study Plan

A hand holding a phone

Description automatically generated with low confidencePhoto by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

Minimum of six hours daily. I work better under pressure. The two modules that I enjoyed the most were IMS (Information Management) and Marketing Management. I did them together, and it turned out to be two distinctions! IMS Professor Radu was someone I really liked. His reply to the forums and interims was why I achieved high marks in IMS.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

After midnight through to early mornings all week plus the weekends.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

For the interim assignment I spent one week and, for final assessments about two weeks’ time. I completed my dissertation within the 6-month minimum period. 

Travelling and Communication

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

The Online residency was a lifesaver as Covid19 disrupted travel to the UK. 

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

The time difference did not pose any problems for me.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

Studying keeps me happy, focused, and desiring more knowledge.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Never give up!!!

A to the point and practical advice by our alumni. I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and provided that motivational boost to your academic plans..You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer and the application process.

Celebrating the Class of 2020 – Proud graduates from York St John University

Last week we celebrated alongside the Class of 2020 as they attended their graduation ceremony. The ceremony was magical and its grandeur as grand as the manganous and iconic York Minster. 

Many stories were shared, and memories created when smiling and proudly beaming graduates of York Business School in exclusive partnership with Robert Kennedy College, walked down the aisle attending their final graduation ceremonies. It is indeed a delightful sight, seeing all the graduates don their hats and gowns and graduate York MBA programme from York Minster.     

Graduation Ceremonies – Class of 2020 – York St John University

On this glorious occasion Reeta Chakrabarti, Chancellor York St John University congratulated the Class of 2020 and applauded their hard work, determination and resilience especially coming out with flying colors during the pandemic. 

Congratulations to all the graduates of Class 2020!!

#DILO – A day in the life of an RKC student – Antonio  

We continue with our blog series bringing you answers to some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) frequently get from students looking to join one of our online programmes. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled online learning challenges. Hopefully, this will, in turn, help you make an informed decision.  

I believe learning is a life-long process. You never know when an opportunity to learn is thrown your way. Would you grab the opportunity, or would you think it’s too late to learn and study when you reach a certain age? But is age just a number?  

Antonio, an RKC student from Mozambique, is a shining example of how age is just a number when it comes to studying for your Masters. Let’s hear his story!  

Who you are, really?   

Antonio M, from Mozambique. A senior citizen still willing to learn and upgrade my skills in new areas associated with my country development.  

Which Uni are you studying at?   

University of Salford  

Which programme did you choose and why?  

Online MSc in Procurement, Logistics and Supply Chain Management  

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?  

Initially, I thought 2h a day would suffice, but I learned that I needed to spend at least an additional hour every day. Let me say, for someone with my slow thinking speed, you need an average 3h a day to be comfortable and do all the homework (forum discussions, contributions). Do this for 6 days a week, 1 day to rest if you can afford it.  

PC: Unsplash.com

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g., early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)   

In my case, evenings due to silence and more available bandwidth for Internet data.  

How did travelling impact your ability to study?    

Being an online course, travelling did not impact too much. When travelling, the main issue was Wi-Fi availability.  

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?   

Most of my peers were around the same or close time. Having a platform and forums eased the interaction. It was not immediate, but I would get the reaction soon enough. With those closer peer friends or people with closer affinity, we shared our mobile numbers, and if required, we would use the mobile phone and interact.  

How much time did you devote to each assignment?    

A lot of time. As soon as you get the assignment brief, start immediately and dedicate at least 3h a day for the assignment. Make sure you state an initial outline as soon as you understand the problem to be solved. Having the outline, Google Scholar all the required stuff, minimum of 15 peer-reviewed references per assignment (my opinion).  
  

PC: Unsplash.com

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

6-7h sleeping, 6-8h working and 3-4h studying, 3h solving family issues, 2h socialising with other people. My community, Rotary, and family would require more of my time and reschedule this time outline.  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies?    

Please make sure you do participate in the weekly activities since usually they prepare you for your assignments. If you do it right, you may have a considerable part of your assignment done, at least in terms of the referencing. Going straight to the assignments is the wrong strategy. I did learn with some pain later that if I had done the week activities it would have made my life easier and would have saved time for my assignments. Otherwise, while busy with the assignment, you understand that you still need to do the work you avoided.  

PC: Canva.com

If you have been dreaming of joining a master’s programme or have had this personal goal to gain a higher degree, now is the time! Take valuable advice from our current students, gain from their experience, add your unique study strategies, and make your own success stories! I would love to feature you one day on our college blog.    

Chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and for information on discounts we might be offering at this time. 

Student Interview – Tina

Henrik Johan Ibsen, the Norwegian playwright and theatre director, once said, “A thousand words leave not the same deep impression as does a single deed.” Unfortunately, after his death, this quote was plagiarized and para-phrased into what we know today.

A picture is worth a thousand words.

Group photo of RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

But motion picture has completely changed the way we consume data. Not only does it enable us to take in more information in a short time, but it also makes the information more credible. Hearing it straight from the source makes a difference. 

Robert Kennedy College (RKC) is pleased to share with you, our readers, students, alumni, and potential students a series of video interviews with some of our graduates, sharing their challenges and tips and tricks for successful studies. It does not matter the programme or the university these students graduated from, they were all students of RKC, they all faced similar challenges in doing a master’s programme online, they all faced a decision – to do or not to do an online master’s degree.

Here is your chance to hear directly from our students and hopefully help you make an informed decision, to help you study better, or simply to motivate you to live your dreams and to achieve your goals. 

Meet Christina, RKC alumni and graduate of York St John University, as she shares her thoughts and decision-making process on why she choose to get back to studying and the challenges she faced.  

York.mba – student’s story – Tina

Hopefully this interview has answered some your questions about RKC and doing a master’s programme online, and please watch this place for more similar blogs. You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for a more personalised discussion of your needs and best match with the programmes we offer, and the application process.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Anthony Cairns

What is the best way to study online? Should you do an online programme? How to better manage time when learning online?

These are all questions that we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get asked regularly by students who are looking to join one of our online programmes. Undertaking to do an online master’s degree programme will be an additional commitment to your time and finances, and it is wise to get information beforehand, cross your T’s and dot your I’s before making your decision. 

Through this continuing series of blog posts, some of our past and current students have shared their thoughts and opinions and given their feedback on handling some of these choices and situations. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision. 

Learning from those who came before you is smart. I am not asking you to follow what they are saying blindly, but to take what they said worked for them and see if it will work for you, maybe make a few changes (or a lot). In the end, only you know what works best for you!

Anthony Cairns is one of our successful students who graduated with a Master of Arts degree in Leading Innovation and Change (This programme has been discontinued, we now offer a 100% Online MBA in Leading Innovation and Change in its stead). Anthony says that his experience in doing an MA via RKC resulted in his now doing a PhD. 

On the left Anthony Cairns – Graduation Picture – 18th November 2015, and on the right Anthony Cairns being awarded his master’s degree by the Archbishop of York in 2015 John Sentamu

Once you get the academia bug, there is no stopping the roller coaster! 😉

Anthony Cairns, RKC Graduate

An Introduction

Who you are, really?

I am a software test management consultant, specialising in software testing, governance, and ISO standards.

Which Uni are you studying with?

I studied with York St John University for my MA. 

Which programme did you choose and why?

MA in Leading Innovation and Change 

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I decided to study 2 modules at the same time, the reality being that I achieved this, but with detriment to perhaps I could have gained higher marks had I studied one at a time. But the end result was I managed to gain my MA in less time than I would have otherwise taken. Although I was working full-time as a contract consultant test manager, I worked every evening from around 7pm until about midnight. I then got up early at around 6am to do a couple of more hours before going to the office.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

I used to personally love the 8pm to midnight, as well as the 6am (if not earlier).

How much time did you devote for each assignment?

Hard to say when I did 2 at the same time, but perhaps I estimate about 20-30 hours each week across 2 modules.

Travelling and Communication

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

Not at all, as when I travelled it was via flight and it gave me extra time to work on my MA.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

There was no real time difference as such as I worked whatever time I need to allocate to get the work done and delivered.

On the top we see Anthony Cairns sitting in the front row with his graduating class, and the bottom picture shows Anthony Cairns with his lovely family

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

Get up early, do some University work. Go and perform my daily paid-for-work. Get back (to home or hotel), then do another couple of hours before dinner. Stop for an hour or so for dinner, then do another 3-5 hours after dinner in the evening.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Perhaps work on a single module at a time. Take all the advice you get from your supervisor, as they have been there many times before. Read, read, read, then read some more. Research is paramount. Give advice and guidance to fellow students who may need a little help and guidance. I did this all the time and found it also personally very rewarding.


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for more similar blogs. You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, and the application process.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student - Dina

Continuing with our blog series bringing you answers to some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get asked frequently by students who are looking to join one of our online programmes, we asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. Hopefully, this will help you make an informed decision.

Let us learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will also help you become a better student!

Dina is from Jordan and has completed our online MBA programme, this is what she had to say about what worked for her.

An Introduction

Who are you, really?  

I am Dina, from Jordan  

Which Uni are you studying with?  

University of Cumbria, U.K.

Which programme did you choose and why?  

MBA in Leadership and Sustainability  

The Study Plan  

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?  

I took one module at a time, and I dedicated one day a week for studying – usually during the weekend, and that’s like 7-8 hours a week, and of course, I did more work for the assignments.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

Weekends the entire day and sometimes early mornings before going to work.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?  

I used to check the assignment at the beginning of each module and take notes as I go through the week. I usually started working on the assignments pretty early so that I had a few weeks before the deadline to plan and manage my time.  

Travelling and Communication

How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

Travelling was not required for my work.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

The forums really helped and made the communication process easier.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

I wake up, check my email, check the forum, go to work and read an article or study a bit before bed. But the majority of the studying was usually done on the weekends.

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

I was sceptical at first, and I thought that I might lose interest in studying, but each module was different. All you need is a little time management and commitment.  


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this space for similar blogs in the future. 

You can now chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and for information on discounts we might be offering at this time.