Things to consider before considering a career change

Let’s admit it! Many of us are not pursuing careers that we dreamt of. Some of us may never have dreamt of a career and ended up doing what was available or what we see others doing. I feel happy (and jealous) of people who figured out early in their lives their career paths. For a variety of reasons, we all have thought of changing careers at some point in life; including those who were once happy with their jobs.

You are not alone if you are considering a career change. It has been an increasingly popular trend in employment history. It is becoming more likely that people will go through at least one career change in their lifetime. 

Here are some stats..  BLS, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, released results from the National Longitudinal Survey in August 2019 about the number of jobs, labor market experience and earnings growth of a sample of Americans tracked over 40 years. According to the survey, individuals held an average of 12.3 jobs from ages 18 to 52, with nearly half of these jobs held before age 25. In this news release, a job is defined as an uninterrupted period of work with a particular employer. On average, men held 12.5 jobs and women held 12.1 jobs from ages 18 to 52. Men held 5.9 jobs from ages 18 to 24, compared with 1.9 jobs from ages 45 to 52. The reduction in the average number of jobs held in successive age groups was similar for women. 

Though it’s not uncommon, a career change should be thought through. Here are a few things you should consider before a career change:

Self-Introspection 

It is critical to self analyze and find out why are you looking for a career change. What is the reason for your discontentment: is it the work or the work environment and co-workers? Are you financially insecure? (Experts advise not to base any decision solely on the basis of money). Are you stuck in the same position doing monotonous work for years, with limited scope for change if any? Are you losing the motivation? Have your priorities changed? Do you yearn for work-life balance? Are you not passionate about the job anymore? Do you simply want to search for a new ‘meaning’ to your life?

Being emotionally and financially strong

If you are still early on in your career, there may be fewer things to worry about before switching careers. However, if it is a mid-life or mature career change, make sure you sort the emotional and financial ties.

Get support

Communicate your thoughts and vision to your family, friends and colleagues. While some of them may discourage you and urge you to take sane decisions, it is important that you have a cushion of support around you at a time you would need it most.

Take small steps 

Do not quit your current job until you find a new one, even if you feel being on the fence and frustrated. Start intensive research in the industry you envision yourself to be in and look for the skills required for those jobs. Make sure to update and personalize your resume for different jobs you may apply to. Explore free resources online for resume and skill development. Now is the ideal time to invest in yourself.

Build and Dive into your Network

Networking is the key to job search. While making conversation and networking may seem out of your comfort zone, you will be amazed to find how valuable a resource people are. Reach out to your contacts or build a network on social media for informational interviews that will not only help you understand the jobs you are interested in but if you are impressive enough they may even consider you for any open or potential positions!  Consider volunteering for different organizations or events to build your network.

Consider further education

While some of your skills from the previous job are transferable, you may have to consider getting another degree. Some jobs may require you to have a certain professional qualification and association, or a Master’s degree. While in a job and considering a career change, you may not want an education debt and going back to school full time. Online education is the solution that will not only fit your busy schedule but also not burn a hole in your pocket. Robert Kennedy College offers Online Masters programmes in exclusive partnership with the University of Cumbria, University of Salford and York St John University. Download the catalogue to know more about the programmes.

I am sure the points above give some food for thought and changing careers does not seem to be as intimidating. If you approach the change radically, it looks more like an achievable dream. We would love to hear from you how you coped with career change. Share your story and advice in the comments below. 

York MBA: The Residency

Quite often we get one of these four questions:

What is the purpose of the residency? What happens during the week at the residency? Why should I attend it? And why is it important?

What better way to have the answers to these questions than to hear it from our alumni and faculty themselves!

The MBA programmes are taught mostly online via OnlineCampus (an interactive online learning environment) with intensive class discussion and collaboration, plus a one-week compulsory residency. Depending on your programme, the residency is held at two locations, Robert Kennedy College in Zürich and at the University campus in York, United Kingdom, both organised and taught by University faculty.

Dr. Brendan Paddison, Director of Post Graduate Studies says, “One of the unique aspects of our programmes with Robert Kennedy College is the blended delivery.”

Here’s what student and faculty have to say about the residency.

“The people who take part in these residencies find them very rewarding, both in terms of amount of energy that they generate, the friendships that they give rise to and the insights that people get into the experiences of those who are working in quite different organizations”, says Dr. George Boak, YSJ Senior Lecturer – Leadership and Innovation.

The residency is held several times during the year offering flexibility to fit your busy work schedule. The only pre-requisite is to have completed at least one module before taking residency.

Cristina Rettig, PR Manager – Glass Manufacturing (Germany) 2018 Graduate found the Residency an essential part of the MBA Programme. She adds, “It’s fantastic to have this online system. It gives you freedom, you can plan your own schedule. But I think to really draw people into it, the residency to me is a really essential part. I loved it, I loved the residency, I found it great!”

Follow the link to find out more about the Online Masters programmes: https://york.mba/catalogue

University of Salford Graduation 2019

Years of hard work and sacrifice culminates on successfully completing your masters degree programme and the reward is being awarded your degree!

Linda Karitanyi – Living her dream and fulfilling her aspirations!

We at Robert Kennedy College are pleased to share with our readers the joy and happiness of one of our students’ – Ms. Linda Karitanyi, who has successfully graduated from the University of Salford with a Master of Science degree in Procurement, Logistics and Supply Chain Management.

Linda choose to attend the graduation ceremony at the university to collect her certificate.

Linda Karitanyi – Sharing her joy with friends and family
Linda Karitanyi @ the University of Salford, UK

Robert Kennedy College with almost 14,000 students from almost every county in the world offers one of the most diverseaccredited and globally recognised online master’s degree programmes in both Business Law, Leadership and Management through exclusive partnerships with British universities. For more information download programme catalogue.

Student Testimonials – Johannes’s Truly Inspirational Story!

This week we bring you the truly inspirational story of Johannes from South Africa; a story which I personally found to be heart warming and one that motivates me to do something better in my life, everyday.

Johannes, a BA graduate and a Banker decided to pursue MA in Leading Innovation and Change (MALIC). One reason was that it is a well known Online Programme offered by the Robert Kennedy College in Switzerland. Another reason was that it was offered in partnership with York St John University in York, England, which he believes is one of the best countries for a special needs student.

Johannes graduated recently and it was a proud moment for him and his wife who commended his dedication throughout the course. He now intends to continue for a PhD.

As Johannes says, “At York, I was not just a number. The University was always eager to help”. Watch Johannes’s story and get motivated!

Success Story from South Africa

Download the catalogue to find out more about the programme, fees, start dates and eligibility criteria.

What Qualities would land you the dream job?

When you are in school or university, you always dream of that dream job that you would like to do after graduation. You earn the crucial academic qualification and gain the necessary knowledge to embark on the professional journey of your life. You may be a fresher or a seasoned professional exploring the job market and may wonder what the employers look for when they are hiring. The hiring process has several layers to it than you as potential applicant can see on the surface. The Job Ad merely states the job description and the key requirements – qualification, experience and skills, required for the job. These are used to for the initial screening and shortlisting. Once shortlisted, when you end up at the interview, the hiring process reaches a different level all together. The employer evaluates you and your personality and whether you are a perfect fit for the job and the company. 

In the recent times it is observed that the employers are giving growing importance to ‘soft skills’; equal if not more to the academic skills and experience relevant to the job. It may therefore make more sense to hone and develop these skills to qualify as that ‘perfect’ candidate for the position:

  • Know what you want from your career 

The employer are really interested to know what you plan for your career, what do you want and how keen you are to work towards it. 

  • Have Vision

All interviewers ask this question – Tell us something about yourself. This is your chance to narrate your life story, how you envisioned it and what you did so far to make it vision your reality.

  • Self-Starter and Independent

This is a huge requirement of an employer for any position! They want to employ a pro-active individual who does not require constant supervision and hand holding; but rather is one step ahead in their work.

  • Sociable and Team builder

It is highly critical for an employer to hire an individual who is a great a team player. None of the organization department work in isolation; and there is interdependence and co-existence within departments as well. The success of any organization depends on how well knit the teams work.

  • Motivated

An ideal hire would be motivated and driven. They should have high personal and professional goals and propelled to achieve them. This will in turn ensure firm’s success and reach its goals. 

  • Assume Responsibility

Employers love to take those applicants onboard who they find have assumed responsibility of tasks, at work, outside or home and took on to complete it responsibly. Own the task or situation you are in.

Complete your Masters online with University of Cumbria’s Masters programmes. Contact our advisor today for guidance on the admission process.  

University of Cumbria Graduation Ceremony

Last month, on a wet Wednesday afternoon, more than 350 RKC students (plus about ten students from other UoC institutions) graduated in the historic medieval Carlisle cathedral. Many of the graduates were there in person to collect their diploma from the Chancellor of the University, the Most Reverend and Right Honourable Dr John Sentamu, Archbishop of York. Some graduates had come from far away, and many were supported, often very enthusiastically, by family members who were not fazed by the poor weather.

Following the ceremony the new graduates socialised together and with their families and faculty members in a nearby hotel over drinks and dinner.

An RKC student, Gregory Foster, graduating with the MBA in Leadership and Sustainability received the university’s Postgraduate Student of the Year prize. Greg had come all the way from Australia to receive his degree and the award, and is shown below between (left to right) David Duffill of RKC, Caroline Rouncefield, Grace Hurford and David Murphy, all of the UoC.

RKC & York St John Graduation 2018

It’s that time of the year again, when I get to travel to York and meet a bunch of our students who have made it all the way! Graduation is a special event, and more so when it takes place in the gigantic York Minster.

There is no way to really convey the feelings during such an event, even with photos and video, but short of having been there, you will have to try!

Congratulations George and Sarah for all your hard work getting the programme started, and Nigel, Amir, Ann, Rinnah, Sasha, Rula, Tim, Naomi, Joseph, Juliana, Misheck, Hannes, Tina, Mark, Leah, Nicole, Ryanhardt, Mufta’U, Wisdom, and sorry we missed you in the photo Patrick, Seth, Chris, Juan and Macaria – and even sorrier you could not be there Luis, Dawnia, Asuncion, Nicolas, Kourosh and Marilyn.

RKC Graduation 2018 @YorkStJohn

RKC Graduation 2018 @YorkStJohn

I am thoroughly excited about continuing this great event in the years to come with all of you now in the York MBA programmes! Looking forward to more smiley photos and silly videos! CONGRATS YOU ALL!

More photos from the day:

Group photo of RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

Group photo of RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

Group photo of RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

Group photo of RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

Group photo of RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

P.S. stay tuned for some in-depth interviews with the graduates, sharing their challenges and tips and tricks for successful studies.

Are you a suitable Master’s applicant?

As a former education advisor, this is one of the most frequently asked questions, I heard from potential applicants: ‘what is the admission criteria of the University’; ‘do I qualify to apply for the programme?’; ‘what is required in the statement of purpose?’. So, here are answers to all your questions. I aim to write this blog as a two part series; the first part, unravelling the admission and qualification requirements. And the second part would focus on what an ‘ideal statement of purpose’ should include.

Reflection session

Reflection session

As a student, I am sure you all do your homework well in researching about the University you would like to apply for the Masters’. You would like to enrol with a University that is accredited, offers wide choice of courses of your interest, competitive fees, great student support, an excellent alumni network; in short the best university according to your requirements. Similarly, University also looks for the best talent; students that can academically outshine and cope the challenging pace of Online Masters; their potential contribution to the programme and the fellow students. While no one factor can be a sole deciding factor, however all the aspects put together constitutes a successful application. Therefore, you can impress the admission officers with one, all or a mix of these following aspects:

  1. Academic excellence: This is the basic, first and foremost factor that all the universities would look at. Your previous qualification forms a basis for your Master’s degree and to a great extent an admission criteria. Many universities consider this as an elimination factor, to select the qualifying applicants. For RKC Online Programmes, minimum qualification is an honours degree at 2:2 or above. **                                                            
  2. The chosen subject – Your interest and passion towards the course: You must demonstrate your background in line to the chose Masters subject and your passion towards it that goes above and beyond what is required in the classroom. Perseverance is the key quality that that will get the attention of the admission committee.
  3. Work Experience: The Online Masters’ with its flexibility has become increasingly accessible to the working professionals. The working professionals bring a lot of real life experience on the table and enrich the programme value with their contributions. Hence, the number of years of experience of your resume will have a positive impact on your application. RKC has a minimum requirement of 2 years of work experience.

    RKC Alumni and MeetVibe founders – Mircea Baldean and Carol Aebi, joined by co-founder Gabriel Paun (left) at Web Summit 2017

  4. Ability to think, work independently and time management: While the Online programme offers flexibility and ease to study from anywhere in the world; it can be quite challenging to manage the study, assignments, work life and personal life. It could be quite a juggle. The university expects you, as a Masters student, to be able to efficiently manage the requirements of the programme.
  5. References: References are an important part of your application process. A reference could be your academic or professional references. Though professional (most recent) are considered to be the most favourable. A reference can tell a lot about the applicant :  maturity, character, leadership, self-confidence, warmth of personality, concern for others, and grace under pressure.
  6. Ability to work in groups: Ability to teamwork is important as well. Most of the course through RKC is conducted online with independent assignments to be submitted online itself. Some part of the modules taught in residency week require group discussions and assignments to be submitted on the basis of such group work. This ability will be reflected in your previous qualification or work experience (as team player or manager) or extra curricular activities. 
  7. English Language Ability: Since the course is fully taught in English, you will be evaluated for your English language skills, through various aspects – how well your resume is penned; formulation of the statement of purpose; verbal communication skills evaluated by education advisor. For admission with RKC, minimum requirement is: English language at IELTS 6.5 (minimum of 5.5 in each component). (This requirement could be waived, depending your previous qualification or experience in English speaking work environment- reference required –speak to our education advisor today for more information).
  8. Statement of Purpose: SOPs have increasingly become one of the most important deciding factors when evaluating an admission application. Its the summary of your past achievements and an insight of how motivated are you going forward. (more details on the next blog.. watch this space :))

 

Now that you have the insiders view of the application requirements, do not delay any further! Apply for your online Masters’ MBA and LLM and Online MSc programmes today and get started for the next intake.

 

 

**Applications are considered from candidates who do not meet the formal entry requirements but can provide evidence of equivalence. Examples of equivalence are:

  • A wide range of professional qualifications and/or work experience.
  • Working or studying in English or an English-speaking environment.

Applications will be considered from candidates who do not meet the formal entry requirements but who can demonstrate by interview the commitment to complete the programme successfully.

 

 

 

Dissertation – An Important part of your Masters’ Programme

A dissertation is a critical part of the masters programme, required for you to graduate. By definition dissertation means: “a substantial paper that is typically based on original research and that gives evidence of the candidate’s mastery both of their own subject and of scholarly method.”

There is a wealth of material on aspects of doing dissertation research, from working in a conducive physical environment, through planning and time management, to academic writing style. You may be well adept with researching and have a flair for writing; or could be like many other students, especially those who have little or no experience of producing an academic dissertation.

Outlined here are some of the key points that would help you write a dissertation worthy of ‘full marks’ leading you to your prized Master’s degree.

  1. Choosing a topic

A good start can give you a good finish. This is perhaps the first and most crucial step that you would be taking in the process of producing a good dissertation. There is a considerable literature on ways to decide on a topic, plan and write up a dissertation.

If you do not have any good ideas about a topic, contact your supervisor outlining some general areas, and ask for advice. Look at what other people have done, or in text books or articles, and/or talk to people in your organisation, and see if anything sparks off an idea, as can often happen. If you do already have concrete ideas, write them all down (do not discard any at this point – even ones which may seem not so good) and discuss them with your supervisor and professors.

  1. Constructing the plan

This is a very important exercise. Without a clear plan at the outset, you may find you have collected a large quantity of data with too vague an idea of what to do with it. Some students prefer to read around a subject-area while making extensive notes before constructing a plan. There are various ways of making a plan. Many people like to start with what is known as the Star system: a central idea with subsidiary ideas attached to it, as illustrated here. You begin with a central idea, then attach related ideas to it using lines, out to two or three levels (normally three levels at most, otherwise the diagram becomes unwieldy and even incomprehensible).

3.  Managing time

Time management is something you must have been dealing with right from the onset of the Masters programme. As you inch towards the final stages the course, you must be well aware of all the time management advises you have been given by friends, colleagues, professors, and even internet,  such as not working on your dissertation if you are exhausted, or ignoring something which seems to be distracting you while you work, or working with either background music or in silence depending on what you prefer to do (by the time you get to Masters-level research, it can surely be assumed that you know which you prefer).

 

  1. Data security

Apart from obvious good advice about keeping data well organised, as outlined above, keeping your data secure as well, isn’t really counted as a priority for many. But you will understand how it is of upmost importance to safeguard your hard work.  Do not trust your memory, however good you think it is. Keep complete records of everything you read. Keep a backup copy of all drafts and all notes in a separate location. Do not rely on a single computer. Back up to a removable hard disk or memory stick, or regularly write backups to a CD, or email them to yourself. There is almost nothing worse than the disaster of having lost weeks of work. Data recovery services are expensive and not always successful.

 

  1. Stick to the Basic structure

It is imperative the you follow a structure to pen down an effective dissertation write-up.

  1. Acknowledgements if appropriate/
  2. List of abbreviations.
  3. List of figures and/or tables
  4. Abstract or Executive Summary – normally no more than one page
  5. Introduction – not a description of a company, market etc., but an exposition of the hypothesis or hypotheses, and/or an explanation of the problem(s) or question(s) which will be treated.
  6. A critical review of the relevant literature, partly in order to show the examiner that you are familiar with other people’s work in the field
  7. The method(s) used for gathering the information, and a justification for your decision(s)
  8. The method(s) used for analysing that information and a justification for your decision(s)
  9. The analysis itself, which is often a statistical analysis (and if not, why not?
  10. Presentation of the results.
  11. The conclusions, judgements and/or recommendations (if appropriate) based on the evidence, plus (again if appropriate) suggestions for future research or business activities
  12. Appendix or appendices, if relevant.

 

These steps would assist you getting yourself started on the process. However at any stage, our esteemed professors are always there to guide you through.

 

Get registered for Online Masters today. Download the catalogue for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congratulations to New UoC Graduates!

It has been an exciting week in Cumbria! Last week, the 3-day Graduation ceremony at Cumbria saw over 2000 students graduating from a wide variety of courses. It’s been an incredible week for all at the University of Cumbria. Each and every graduate would go on to achieve amazing things in their lives and careers.

 

 

Proud Moment!

The long awaited Walk..

 

 

Cheers!

 

Proud family and friends gathered around to cheer the recent graduates, brimming with joy and pride! Their long and enduring hours of tirelessly studying towards their goals, ultimately manifesting into the reality of the degrees and diplomas in their hand! There were bouquets of flowers that some carried into the arena. But mostly, there was an arena full of pride that emulated from grandparents, parents, siblings and cousins as diplomas were handed out.

              

Truly Diverse and an amazing Social Network of Graduates from all over the World

                  

 

We’ve been so happy to see our students graduate. However, they all started with the same step – applying to university.