#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Philip Redhead

What is the best way to study online? Should you do an online programme? How to better manage time when learning online?

How to deal with the challenges of learning online? Photo by Thomas Park on Unsplash.

These are all questions that we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get regularly asked by students looking to join one of our online programmes. Undertaking to do an online master’s degree programme will be an additional commitment to your time and finances, and it is wise to get information beforehand.

Through this continuing series of blog posts, some of our past and current students have shared their experiences, thoughts and opinions and given their feedback on handling some of these choices and situations. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

“Expect it to be tough but rewarding.”

Philip Redhead

An Introduction

Photo by Vladislav Klapin on Unsplash.

Who are you?

Philip Redhead

Which Uni are you studying with?

York St John University

Which programme did you choose and why?

MBA Leading Innovation and Change. I selected this course to build on my MSc in Educational Leadership and Management in terms of a broader business and strategy angle.

The Study Plan

Photo by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

Each module really does require 200-300 hours. I planned for 2-3 hours per day on most weekdays and extended periods at weekends. I also took leave at crucial times to ensure submission deadlines were met.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

Evenings through the week and full days at weekends and on the days I took leave leading up to the draft and final submissions.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

200-300 hours

Travelling and Communication

Photo by Marten Bjork on Unsplash.

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

As a consultant, I was travelling regularly, which helped me have alone time in hotels to focus on my studies. I even got quite a lot done on planes.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

This was fine. I was always within 3-4 hours of Zurich and York. Also, being ‘ahead’ gave me an extra feeling of comfort over deadlines!

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

Depends. On working weekdays maybe 2 hours most evenings. Then planned, long days in cafes.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Expect it to be tough but rewarding. Plan time across the 12 weeks of each module when you know, you will be alone and not be disturbed. The better you plan and communicate your plan, the more understanding and supportive your family and employer will be! Select your module dates according to your commitments, and don’t be afraid to change. Resist the temptation to do this quickly and overlap courses if you are also working full time.


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for more similar blogs. You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer and the application process.

“Focus on your key objectives in 2022” – Dean’s message for the New Year!

A new year means new resolutions. As we all fasten our seat belts and rush to achieve our newly formulated objectives, Prof. David Costa, Dean, Robert Kennedy College (RKC), advises to the contrary and suggests we take it slow. Dr Costa proposes not to get overwhelmed or distracted with a long list of resolutions but to focus on small and critical objectives to start with.

We have a great support system for our students at Robert Kennedy College. From highly qualified faculty to a world-class professional alumni network, you’ll know you made the right decision to study for your master’s degree with RKC. Join us today.

#DILO – A day in the life of an RKC student – Lebo

It’s 2022 and everyone is busy making new resolutions for the year. If you are looking for some inspiration and guidance on how the online studies of Master’s look like, look no further. We continue with our blog series bringing you answers to some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) frequently get from students looking to join one of our online programmes. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled online learning challenges. Hopefully, this will, in turn, help you make an informed decision.  

I believe learning is a life-long process. You never know when an opportunity to learn is thrown your way. Would you grab the opportunity, or would you think it’s too late to learn and study?

Who you are, really?   

My name is Ramona F.

Which Uni are you studying at?   

University of Cumbria

Which programme did you choose and why?  

Online MBA International Healthcare Management. I am a Registered nurse who wanted to have more of a formal training as a nurse manager.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?  

I work three days most weeks and I usually plan to use two days for studying. But most of the time, life happens and I have to boycott that plan and burn the midnight oil and not sleep to meet the study deadlines.

PC: Unsplash.com

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g., early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)   

Weekends worked better for me.

How did travelling impact your ability to study?    

Not much. I usually would study at home due to my work demands.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?   

I would interact with peers and professors through the forums, WhatsApp groups and email or phone calls. I stayed up late to meet others in different time zones.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?    

As much as I could afford. Sometimes a whole 24 hour day was just used by default to try to get the work done on time.  

PC: Unsplash.com

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

Working a 12 to 14 hours shift, getting home and making dinner and helping your kid with homework. Then staying up after hours to do assignments. In nutshell there was no rest mostly.

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies?    

You can do it! Here are my two cents:

1. Get the cumbria/RKC account set up to your mobile, so that you can participate in forums while not at home and see deadlines or any changes. 2. Print a copy of the weekly assignments with deadlines and strike off as they are completed. 3. Reach out to your course peers. 4. Let the lecturer know if you are facing any difficulty. 5. No question is stupid! 6. Try to get the required textbook. 7. Read several sources 8. Use peer reviewed sources whether it’s required or not. 9. Get access to the UOC library.

Good luck!

PC: Canva.com

If you have been dreaming of joining a master’s programme or have had this personal goal to gain a higher degree, now is the time! Take valuable advice from our current students, gain from their experience, add your unique study strategies, and make your own success stories! I would love to feature you one day on our college blog.    

Chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and for information on discounts we might be offering at this time. 

It’s 2022! Happy New Year!

On behalf of the staff and students at Robert Kennedy College, I would like to wish all our readers and their families a Happy New Year 2022! May this year be blessed and bring an end to COVID!

2020 was a real downer of a year, and so when 2021 started, we all had hopes that this year would be much better than 2020. We hoped that we would be able to return to a pre-COVID lifestyle. And to some extent, we achieved this, but sadly many things have remained the same.

Let’s start with the positives and see how things changed for the better

Vaccinations: 2020 was the year of the pandemic, but 2021 was the year of vaccinations. The world made a concerted effort to fight the CORONA virus, and our scientists created the COVID vaccines in record time. Our healthcare professionals were, of course, the first to get themselves vaccinated because they risked it all and were at the frontlines during the peak of the pandemic in 2020. Most of us were right behind them and were desperate to get ourselves vaccinated as soon as possible. Not only to protect ourselves from COVID but to be able to go out and socialise.

I want to thank our scientists and healthcare professionals who worked tirelessly to create the vaccines and for keeping us safe and healthy even during the pandemic’s peak.

Our gratitude to all the scientists and healthcare professionals. Photo by Alexas_Fotos on Unsplash.

Back to office: 2021 was the year offices started opening up. While most of us got used to working from home, there were a few among us who just got frustrated and demotivated sitting at home all the time. Going back to the office just lifted the spirits. So, the offices opening up, all be it in a limited way and following COVID protocols, can as a timely relief for a number of us.

Entertainment: I know I keep mentioning “socialising” repeatedly, but as the legendary Greek philosopher Aristotle said, “man is by nature a social animal”. And with vaccinations, theatres, restaurants, cafés, etc., started to reopen. I remember a friend wanting to catch up atacafé as soon as it opened because she was scared we might go back into another lockdown if she delayed. But we could at least go back to socialising in a small way.

Back to school: While physically going to school will have a minimal impact on graduate or postgraduate students and self-learning forms an essential part of their learning, it makes a big difference to primary and secondary school students. For young developing minds, the social interaction they experience at school plays a vital role in their social skills development, and the physical activities they undertake at school help them develop physically. And of course, parents also get to catch up on work and their other interests when they don’t have to constantly find ways to keep their kids productively occupied and entertained at the same time.

Going to school is vital for developing social skills. Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash.

Holiday: While I haven’t gone on a holiday since January 2020, I know many people who have gone on holiday, and they have all got back much happier and refreshed, especially after being locked in at home for most of 2020 and 2021. Being able to get away from your daily life and having the opportunity to recharge is vital to remain productive.

And now for the negative (Yes, there is only one as I see it!)

Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash.

The virus: COVID-19 is what has made us all change the way we live. It hit us hard in 2020, and despite us fighting back in 2021, the virus has evolved – from Delta to Omicron, the virus has mutated and continues to impact our lives. And we are helping it on its evolution by not following COVID-19 protocols, not wearing masks in public, not social distancing, and, most importantly, not getting vaccinated. If we ever want to return to “normal” life (per COVID era life), we must fight COVID together. Listen to what the medical professionals tell us and follow the COVID protocols. Otherwise, this is going to be our new norm.


If you are looking to add a few new skills or a master’s degree to prepare yourself for the “new norm” or prepare for life to return to the “old normal”, consider joining one of our specialised master’s degree programmes. You could also get in touch with our team of admission advisers on WhatsApp, who can have a look at your profile and give you some advice.

If you have already made up your mind, click here to apply.