Interview hacks to land yourself that dream job (and a well-paid one too!)

I have had a fair share of job interviews in my career so far. And thinking retrospectively, I realize most (if not all) of these interviews asked very similar questions. You can probably relate. 

An interview is a great opportunity to prove your worth to the interviewer
  1. Tell us a little bit about yourself (a bit of a time-waster, unless they are trying to judge your verbal communication skills – otherwise that information is already present in your CV (or should).
  2. Why are you looking for a change/career change? 
  3. Why do you want to work with us? 
  4. What value will you add to this company? 
  5. What are your strengths and weaknesses? 
  6. What criticism or advice did you get in your earlier job? 
  7. Where do you see yourself in 5-10 years? (another cliche´ and rather a useless question).
  8. Proudest accomplishment? 
  9. What motivates you the most in a job? 
  10. Explain the gap in your career. 
  11. How do you handle the pressure? Describe a situation when you did that and how. 
  12. What are your hobbies/passion? 
  13. Describe a situation when you went over and beyond the job requirements and expectations.
  14. What are your salary expectations?

Behavioural Interviews

Some of these questions are “old school” and of little value, but more recent research in HR, and in particular recruitment and selection point to the value of behavioural interviews and there is a tendency towards this approach in recent years.  

When interviewers conduct a behavioural interview, they are looking for past experience and evidence of existing behaviours; a clear advantage over hypothetical questions such as “how would you handle conflict with a co-worker” where most candidates will try to give the “right” answer. They are looking to find the right fit, not only for the job role but for their company as a whole. You will normally be asked to respond to questions during such an interview using the CAR (Context, Action, Result) or STAR (Situation, Task, Action and Result) structures. These interviews are highly focused, situation-based interviews that demand crisp, precise and structured responses and having the ability to answer in this way takes practice.

It may seem to be an intimidating experience, but as you go through job interviews throughout your career, you will probably come to realize it is merely a conversation between the interviewer and the interviewee. While you may be nervous about answering the questions right, the interviewer is equally concerned about asking the right questions and establishing a good rapport with you. Recruitment and selection are an expensive process for any company, and they would like to avoid a re-run of the process for the same position again. Organizations do realize the importance of a good employee and of the fact that even if the interview process does not end up in selection, the candidate is a potential customer of their product or service, and they would like to make a good impression.  

Preparing the interview

Receiving an interview call in itself means that you knocked off other competitors and possess the competencies that the company is looking for in its potential employee. However, do not become complacent at this point. You have got to prove your worth and an interview is a perfect opportunity to make your case as to why the interviewer should hire you. Here are a few tips that will help you in preparation for a successful job interview. 

Pre-interview preparation

Understand the job description 

The humble job description yields much more than a naïve interviewee can decipher. The job description provides you with details such as the qualifications, qualities and competencies the company desires in a candidate (at least if the job description is done well). You could pick up hints on potential questions that an interviewer may ask in an interview. This is a good opportunity to align your presentation of your qualities to the given job description and make the case that you are the right candidate for the role. 

Match your qualifications to the Job 

You must have a good understanding of how you qualify for the job and why you are interviewing for the position. You must be able to explain to the recruiter your interest in the position and convince them how and why you are the best fit for the role. You have to be honest with yourself first – are you really a good fit? 

Research the Company and the role thoroughly 

This is probably one of the most common complaints, or, rather, disappointments for a recruiter: to see the candidate did not do their homework well and have little knowledge of the company and the position. Do thorough research to show that you have invested time in preparing for the job, and do care about the company, its values, and requirements of the job. 

Identify the requirements of the company – empathize with their problem 

When the recruiter asks questions like “why should we hire you?” Or “what can you offer that no one else can?”, they really are looking to understand if you “get” their requirements and whether hiring you would solve their problems. Be a problem solver to increase your chances of recruitment. Scrutinize all resources available such as company website, YouTube channel, LinkedIn profile, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram presence, etc.  

Google Yourself 

You want to put your best foot forward in an interview. You would not want to be surprised at the interview. Some experts report that up to 85% of hiring managers “Google” a candidate before or after an interview, and so should you. See what the first page of results brings upon you, and be ready to answer any questions about those (whether flattering or non-flattering) results. 

Rehearse and Role-play 

The best way to score your performance at an interview is to practice mock interviews. Rehearse the answers you would want to give and watch out for non-behavioural communication that might confound the message. There are apps available now that use AI to score you (almost in real-time) on diction, intonation, filler words, and so on. Practice with a friend works well too.

Prepare in advance for STAR interviews

The mantra to be successful when appearing for the STAR/CAR interviews is to go prepared. Strategize and draw your responses from the key competencies for the position. Structure your responses with situations that highlight your knowledge and behaviour from previous experiences. This is a great opportunity to impress the interviewer with your skills and achievements.

Work on your body language and interview etiquettes 

Recruiters are generally good readers of body language and can gauge your confidence level just by the way you shake hands with them (they do this for a job, after all). Other body languages such as posture, gaze, how and where you sit on the chair, can leak information about your state of mind and sincerity.

Interviewers analyze your body language and etiquettes

Plan your travel ahead and get directions 

An employer appreciates punctuality and pro-activeness from its potential candidates. Being prepared and arriving prior to the scheduled time for the interview can always earn you some brownie points. 

At the interview

Wear appropriate interview clothing and groom your hair 

You do not have to dress to kill. However, put on formal clothing and take care of even how you groom your hair. A hippy hairstyle may speak volumes of your character and preferences that may not necessarily fit with the company’s vision and values. Then again, if that is who you are and enjoy being, showing your true colours can prevent landing a job in an environment you might not enjoy!

Know what to bring along for the interview  

Always ask ahead of the interview if you need to bring any original documents, certificates, etc.

Hone your salary negotiation skills

One tricky question that most candidates are hesitant about responding to during an interview, and for good reason, is about compensation.

Interviewers ask this question to see how well you know your worth, or maybe as a way to get a “cheaper” deal. Is it fair to ask it? Debates are raging, but one thing is for sure – it is fair not to answer it! 

Of course, you do not want to antagonize your interviewer, and there are different ways to handle remuneration related questions avoiding conflict. Try to deflect such questions towards the end of the interview, so that you have complete knowledge and understanding of job duties and expectations. Experts advise that instead of quoting a number, always provide a salary range. Show that you are open to negotiations. Include other remuneration forms like benefits and perks as an opportunity to negotiate.

Prepare follow-up questions 

Most recruiters will normally allow the opportunity to ask questions at the end of the interview – be ready to do so. It shows your interest and how well you have researched the company.  

These are some of the hacks that will come in handy to break through the toughest interviews. Sound knowledge of your field of work, grit and thinking off the feet can actually get you on the other side of the table.  

Do share with us your job interview experiences in the comment section below. And I wish those who are going to appear for a job interview the best of luck. Even though our students are mostly employed while they study in the Masters programmes, most do end up interviewing for new/better jobs as a result of graduating.  

All you need to know about University of Cumbria’s Residency

It is 2020! First and foremost, on behalf of our entire team at Robert Kennedy College, I would like to wish you a very Happy New Year. We wish you good health and a positive mindset, and success will follow!

All of our University of Cumbria’s online MBA programmes have six-course modules – four core modules, one elective and one residential. The mandatory one-week residential module is held in the UK at either the Ambleside, Lancaster or Carlisle campus. The module title is “Tackling Global-Local Challenges in Ethics, Responsibility and Sustainability“. There are several dates during the year which you can choose from to attend the residency that fits your busy schedule. 

Time flies and it is almost time for the first Residency in January 2020 for our University of Cumbria’s Master of Business Administration programme students. For those who are not our students yet and wondering what is a Residency, keep on reading to find out all about it. And those who are registered for this upcoming residency, pull up a diary and make notes of what to expect and how to prepare well for the residency, because here are some real insights, tips and advice from our current students about their own experience attending the residency last year. 

The topic: Tackling Global-Local Challenges in Ethics, Responsibility and Sustainability

All our MBA programmes focus on real-life problems and issues that enable you to think critically about your company and your own career. Corporate social responsibility (CSR), according to Visser, involves what is called the four ‘DNA responsibility bases’ of good governance, value creation, environmental integrity and societal contribution. There is a demand for the more global marketplace and more ethical managerial conduct to deal with the global-local challenges, and responsible leadership is an answer to such demand.

Our students are leaders or aspiring leaders in the business world who face this challenge in their companies every day. This residential module allows the students to gain insight into how the dimensions of corporate governance, sustainable development and ethics are affecting and shaping today’s organizational policies and practices. Students are guided and invigorated to unique ideas and solutions to issues faced by their current organization or local community. This is an enriching one-week that promotes experiential learning through contemporary case studies and teamwork.

Where and When to plan for residency?

We surveyed about 120 of our current MBA students with some of the frequently asked questions about the residency. We got 50 answers back (a response rate you should be very happy with for your dissertations, even though you would, of course, aim for higher numbers!). Here’s what they have to say about their experience at the residency, sharing some immensely useful tips learned the hard experiential way.

There was 50:50 split on the choice of location of residency between the Ambleside and Lancaster campus.

A vast majority of students (80%) had completed at least four modules before attending the residency and a little less than half of all respondents (46%) thought the right time to attend the residency was when they were about half-way through the course. So the takeaway here is to try and take the residency somewhere after the third or fourth module.

On the other hand, 24% of students would have rather attended the residency as soon as possible after completing the first module.

Attending the residency right after the first module allows one to have human interaction in the otherwise online programme, establish relationships that develop and last throughout the programme and beyond, and allow you to better relate to your peers and colleagues

Paul H.

Some students found that it can help with the rest of the modules too. Peter said that he found taking the residency early on gave additional value in the structuring of academic writing and formulation of assignments as well as how to use OneSearch.

For those who voted for attending residency either halfway through or as late as possible attributed it to the fact that having finished other modules equipped them with a better foundation and management tools to interact and respond in the group.

Thus depending on whether you are more a human interaction person or self-starter, you can choose the right time to attend your residency. 

MALIC Residency Nov 2012
Team Discussion during Residency

What else do you learn at the residency?

Many of our students ask “why is the residency important in an online programme?” and what does one actually gain from it.

It was a great experiential learning experience with an interdisciplinary and diverse group from around the world.

Luis C.

Many students gained an interest and understanding of the future focus of sustainability and climate change, the value of cross-sector collaboration, how to tackle ethical dilemmas and apply ethical theories in real-life.

Others learned about the concepts of Triple bottom line, SDGs 2015 and ERS, and yet others learned how to structure their dissertation. Maurice B., who came to the residency with over 35 years of experience of working, studying and interacting with multi-cultural groups, was nevertheless impressed by the high degree of professionalism, dedication and above all the feelings of warmth, the receptiveness of the residency.

Congratulations to all on a splendid display of academics, stewardship of facilitation, operational and executive excellence – the absolute best I have ever seen!

Maurice B.

A staggering 80% of the students surveyed agreed that the learning at residency was completely relevant and 92% said there was a definitive value-add in attending the residency.

The majority of the students found meeting the peers and professors a valuable experience and felt better prepared for the rest of the programme. So though the residency week can be pretty intensive and action-packed (as 44% of students agree), 62% of students admit it is a lot of fun as well!

It is the best experience of the MBA program, combining both theoretical and practical aspects of sustainability in business with a multicultural team. The group exercises are just great and the tour in nature is very inspiring. I’m convinced you will enjoy it!

Serge
A reflection session in progress

Where to stay during the residency?

I must say it was a unanimous response from most of the students on the survey, that one must stay close to the university during the residency week. Make your travel plans in advance and book accommodation early to avoid any disappointments. Talk to our StudentCare team and they can provide a list of accommodation near campus for your stay during residency.

Book accommodations directly through university suggested facilities and arrive a day early to acclimate. Don’t forget to make daily summarizations  of activities and sessions.

Rosamunde C.

Many students also put a word of caution about the wet weather conditions in Cumbria, UK and recommend coming prepared for cold and rainy weather. 

To summarize the residency, I would like to quote John’s advice in his own words:

1. Plan for your UK visa in advance – it takes up to 3 months depending on the holiday season and country you are located in. ([editor’s note] and this was before Brexit!)

2. Book the hotel in advance – depending on the season, it is difficult to find accommodation especially in and around the University of Cumbria specially during the March season. 

3. Weather – when you want to play golf, it rains in the UK. Therefore, prepare yourself with winter-wear, umbrella (if possible), windcheater or raincoat and boots as there are outdoor activities and trekking involved. 

4. Time management – spend about an hour to revise the day’s work so you are prepared for the next day’s activity. When in groups, participate and lead the team as some peers may be in a holiday mood. Get them to work with you and research for the final day activity – prepare and participate. 

5. Cumbria – is the place of William Wordsworth – daffodils are everywhere, enjoy them and unwind in the midst of nature. This is the place to be if you are interested in Sustainability and Environment.

John M.

I hope reading through the blog you gained valuable insight into our residency module and how to best prepare yourself for it. And we could not agree more with this quote from Fatos:

It will be an experience you will have once in a lifetime. I assure you will not regret any day being in Ambleside!

Fatos A.

Finally, a big thanks to all our students who helped us provide you with these tips and tricks about the residency – they generously offered their time and advice – a sharing spirit we witness every day in our OnlineCampus.

See you in Cumbria!

Women in Higher Education – The 21st Century and The Future

Welcome Readers to the concluding part of the two-part blog on Women in Higher Education. It has been an intriguing first part; unveiling the history of education for women from medieval times, victorian era and revolutionising and challenging the political, cultural and intellectual state of affairs through the Women’s Liberation Movement. It’s even more interesting to see how far forward Women’s education has come to till date and what ensues in the future!

Equal Education, Equal Job Opportunities and Equal Pay: The Women’s Liberation Movement bought with it tremendous upheavals for women not only in the area of jobs and education; however it was instrumental in eradicating discrimination against women in walks of daily life like financing a mortgage or provision of goods and services. And when Sex Discrimination Act came into force in 1972, it led to ban of discrimination against women on the grounds of sex and marital status. Many universities that were single-sex only became co-educational institutions. Universities no longer could deny admission to women and prefer a male counterpart. Women got equal job opportunities and continued to work after marriages and becoming a mother as well.

21st Century – The Way Forward : Its been nearly five decades since the implementation of Sex Discrimination Act and the world now saw women’s education in entirely new light. The changing nature of work is swiftly making today’s education systems, labour policy and social contracts outdated. As a result, the path to a good life is increasingly difficult to identify and attain for many people. According to the World Economic Forum, there is a 32% gender gap, when you take into account health, education, economic participation and political attainment. Traditional tools, policies and structures are insufficient to address these challenges. Progress requires new data, new narratives, new dialogue, new tools, new behaviour and new collaboration.

Long standing advocates of women empowerment are endorsing equal respect and opportunities and also establishing the urgency of this task. This comes in the light of the realisation that women’s education is not only critical for women themselves, but has massive economic repercussions as well. The world economies are expanding and women are increasingly playing a crucial role in the development. For example, raising women’s labour force participation to that of men can boost GDP, for example, by as much as 9% in Japan and 27% in India. IMF research has uncovered myriad other macroeconomic benefits: reducing gender gaps in employment, as well as in education, can help economies diversify their exports; appointing more women onto banking supervision boards can challenge cozy group-thinking, thereby supporting greater bank stability and financial sector resilience; and tackling gender inequality can reduce income inequality, which, in turn, can drive more sustainable growth. Its hard to believe but even in the 21st century there are almost 90% countries that have one or more gender-based legal restrictions! These range from not being able to buying a property, to a husband having right to deny and restrict their wives from working. Helping women stay active in the workplace while raising a family is the key. In countries like Norway, for instance, affordable childcare and parental leave schemes have made it possible for both mothers and fathers to work. It is imperative that investing in women is investing in the future. As Prime Minister of Norway and Head of IMF rightly quote, “Time is up for discrimination and abuse against women. The time has come for women to thrive.”

Connect to us on our New Mobile App!

This is an exciting time for us at Robert Kennedy College! We envision and strive to provide world class Masters Education and exceptional student service. We like to be connected to our prospective students and give you all information you need to know about your Master’s programme, at your fingertips!

So, quite literally, we got everything at your fingertips and are happy to announce the launch of the new Mobile App for University of Cumbria. This user friendly App is available to download on both Android and iOS devices.

The Mobile App is a comprehensive tool giving you all information you could ask for; from courses offered, fees, duration, FAQs, and you can Apply through the App as well. You cannot wish for a simpler and quicker life than this!

Here is the snapshot of how the App looks:

You can download the app athttps://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=swiss.rkc.cumbria
or for iphone https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/unicumbria/id1464904297?mt=8

Download now and start sharing with your friends!

Women in Higher Education – The History and The Future

Dear Readers, I am going to present this blog as a two part series. This week, in Part 1, I reflect and reminisce through the long history of women’s education. In the impending blog, we will explore how the history unfolded and revolutionised in the 21st century of Online Learning.

I feel blessed and grateful to my parents who stressed upon the importance of education and always encouraged me to attain higher levels of education. As a young girl, primary education came but naturally to me. Equal opportunities and maybe better than my brother, were provided to ensure I receive quality formal and university education. But this has not always been the case back in the history of women’s education. As a woman, today I feel grateful to those who fought for, liberalised movement and demanded rights rather than asking for concessions.

Medieval, Early Modern Period and Georgian time : There were not many educational opportunities back in the medieval times. The education was mainly the responsibility of the Church or the families themselves. Girls were usually not the part of education system run by monks and nuns unless the girls wanted to become nuns themselves. Family system though seem to include girls, however only so they could lead their households successfully in future. Early modern period saw some freedom by consequence of education. The Georgian time resiled back to limited scope and avenues for women’s education. It was the time when despite increasing literacy rates and supporting movements like bluestocking movement; the concept of ‘separate spheres’ began gaining momentum. It meant segregating roles of men and women, with men incharge of the outside work world and women responsible for family upbringing and household.

The Victorian era: With the advent of Industrial Age, increasing number of men went seeking mechanical, trades and techinical education. There was n increasing pressure from women as well around the time to provide them equal opportunities and avenues of education. New educational institutions, founded by influential women, sprung up like Cheltenham Ladies’ College in 1853, and Roedean School in 1885. Also establishment of Education Act in 1880, laid the foundation of compulsory and free primary education. Not only did formal education advanced, women got free reign in University Education in Victorian era. In 1878, University of London became first university in the UK to award degrees to women.

The Women’s Liberation Movement: The women’s liberation movement (WLM) was a political alignment of women and feminist intellectualism that emerged in the late 1960s and continued into the 1980s primarily in the industrialized nations of the Western world, which affected great change (political, intellectual, cultural) throughout the world. Women’s Liberation Movement as a whole was much aided by the opportunities offered to a post-war generation of girls who had been able to get into the grammar school system, and the opportunities offered to them at these schools. The Women’s Liberation Movement held a series of conferences around the country to demand equal pay, equal educational and job opportunities, and legal and financial independence from men, among other things.


University of Cumbria ranked 28th in 2019 WhatUni Student Choice Rankings

It is with great honour that Robert Kennedy College announces that our partner university, the University of Cumbria, has been ranked 28th out of 131institutions in this year’s UK WhatUnisurvey results table. The University of Cumbria has marked a consistent improvement in its rankings over the last couple of years, moving up the ranking by 67 places in the last two years itself. 

One of the key differentiators that separates the UK WhatUni survey results from other rankings is that it is solely driven by the opinion of current students and not historical data.  Demonstrating sustained improvements in student experience over the last five years, the university’s ranking has risen annually since 2015 – from 112th in 2015 to today’s 28th position – as has its overall point score (3.51 in 2015 to 4.17 in 2019).

For the WhatUni Student Choice Awards, students give their university an overall star rating of one to five; those results are averaged to create overall ratings (out of five stars) for each university across eight categories of student experiences.  Existing students also write a review of their university experience which helps future students find the right university for them. Other key headline figures include the universities’ overall score increasing from 4.1 in 2018 to 4.17 this year. In terms of categories, the University of Cumbria improved in seven of the eight areas with course and lecturers and the Students’ Union seeing the biggest rise in rankings. The university continues to score well in job prospects and student support.

Through our exclusive partnership with the University of CumbriaRobert Kennedy Collegeis proud to contribute to the continued success of the university and heartily congratulate the university, staff and faculty of their success thus far and wish them continued success in the future.

Get to know your University better

ABOUT UNIVERSITY OF CUMBRIA

You must have been looking all over the internet to find a suitable University to pursue your Online Masters. There are several factors you would consider while choosing a University (check out our blog: Choosing the right University). The fact that you are reading this blog is that you either have decided to join Robert Kennedy College (RKC), or are looking for more information. It is natural to be intrigued and yearning to learn more about the University of Cumbria and Robert Kennedy College offering the Masters programmes and understand the partnership between them. This blog is a one-stop shop for all your questions.

The University of Cumbria has a long history behind its existence. It was formed in 2007 by the merger of St Martin’s College, Cumbria Institute of the Arts and University of Central Lancashire’s Cumbria sites, operating from campuses spread across Cumbria and North Lancashire. It may be a relatively new university, but is steeped in history dating right the way back to 1822. The University is continuing to grow, expanding in geographical terms as well as academic scope. The University focuses on to enrich students so that they can realise their potential and achieve life-changing outcomes. UoC has come along way since 2007 and has achieved laurels in various fields; which ranks it as one of sought-after universities.

New Vision: Confidence and consistency; the words that Geoff Donnelly uses throughout his first interview as chairman of the board of the University of Cumbria. The Chairman says, “My task is to ensure we continue to have the leadership and strategy necessary to achieve our goals. He added: “We’re still a new organisation but recent achievements such as 35th in the WhatUni sector rankings, graduate employment results which place us in the top half of the sector, coupled with contracts with Rolls Royce and the growing reputation of our Project Academy demonstrate both our progress and our ambition.

Excelling in Women Representation in Business: In 2009, UoC was one of the eight organisations in the northwest to be awarded the Women’s Business Centre Quality Standard.

Creating International Partnerships: The university welcomes students from Robert Kennedy College, who it partnered with for their MBA Awards in 2010.

IFLAS: UoC in 2012 launched an Innovative Institute for Leadership and Sustainability (IFLAS) at Ambleside Campus.

Award Winning University: The University received two Times Higher Education Leadership and Management Awards; Outstanding Student Services Team and Outstanding Finance Team in 2014.

UoC hosts 2018 UN World Investment Forum: The Institute for Leadership and Sustainability (IFLAS), based at the university’s Ambleside campus, gathered experts to discuss the underlying technology that powers cryptocurrencies such as bitcoins known as blockchain.

MoU with Chinese Government: “The Chinese Government clearly sees the modernisation and the creation of Chinese internationally credible vocational education system as fundamental to the success of the Belt and Road initiative,” Prof Gale said. “We signed fourteen Memoranda of Understanding – a clear indication of the value of the trip and a sense that the Chinese really want to do business with the University of Cumbria.” Forestry was the prime area where University found favour.

University receives power to Award Research Degrees: In March 2019, The University of Cumbria has been awarded Research Degree Awarding Powers (RDAP), which will allow it to grant research degrees such as doctorates for the first time since the university’s formation in 2007. This achievement comes after more than 18 months of rigorous and in-depth assessment by the Quality Assurance Agency.

Last but definitely not the least; Campus within a National Park and UNESCO World Heritage Site: The University has campuses in Carlisle, Ambleside, and Lancaster and a specialist centre in London. At Ambleside Campus, nestled in the heart of the Lake District, you get to witness 912-square mile picturesque patchwork – with more than 150 high peaks and 16 lakes. Visit the campus for the One week Compulsory residency or for your Graduation Ceremony.#Ambleside is one of the favourite places to start a walk, according to data from the Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey . https://bbc.in/2TK8UWs

Its the famous saying that ” A man is known by the company it keeps”. Same is true for the University you affiliate yourself with, for the highest level education. This blog gives you the insight of the history, present and future of the University. The University of Cumbria is fully recognised by the British Government and duly listed on the United Kingdom’s Department for Business, Innovation and Skills list of recognised UK awarding institutions.

Still have questions? Talk to our academic advisors today!

What Qualities would land you the dream job?

When you are in school or university, you always dream of that dream job that you would like to do after graduation. You earn the crucial academic qualification and gain the necessary knowledge to embark on the professional journey of your life. You may be a fresher or a seasoned professional exploring the job market and may wonder what the employers look for when they are hiring. The hiring process has several layers to it than you as potential applicant can see on the surface. The Job Ad merely states the job description and the key requirements – qualification, experience and skills, required for the job. These are used to for the initial screening and shortlisting. Once shortlisted, when you end up at the interview, the hiring process reaches a different level all together. The employer evaluates you and your personality and whether you are a perfect fit for the job and the company. 

In the recent times it is observed that the employers are giving growing importance to ‘soft skills’; equal if not more to the academic skills and experience relevant to the job. It may therefore make more sense to hone and develop these skills to qualify as that ‘perfect’ candidate for the position:

  • Know what you want from your career 

The employer are really interested to know what you plan for your career, what do you want and how keen you are to work towards it. 

  • Have Vision

All interviewers ask this question – Tell us something about yourself. This is your chance to narrate your life story, how you envisioned it and what you did so far to make it vision your reality.

  • Self-Starter and Independent

This is a huge requirement of an employer for any position! They want to employ a pro-active individual who does not require constant supervision and hand holding; but rather is one step ahead in their work.

  • Sociable and Team builder

It is highly critical for an employer to hire an individual who is a great a team player. None of the organization department work in isolation; and there is interdependence and co-existence within departments as well. The success of any organization depends on how well knit the teams work.

  • Motivated

An ideal hire would be motivated and driven. They should have high personal and professional goals and propelled to achieve them. This will in turn ensure firm’s success and reach its goals. 

  • Assume Responsibility

Employers love to take those applicants onboard who they find have assumed responsibility of tasks, at work, outside or home and took on to complete it responsibly. Own the task or situation you are in.

Complete your Masters online with University of Cumbria’s Masters programmes. Contact our advisor today for guidance on the admission process.  

How to better market your master’s degree when applying for a job

Most master’s degrees will equip students with essential skills that are indispensable in the work place. But what most employers don’t realise or take for granted is that master’s degree also equips students with a higher level of skill, discipline and specialist knowledge needed in today’s highly competitive and global business environment.

Thus, the importance of properly marketing your master’s degree, highlighting specialised skills and knowledge learnt is vital in securing the career you seek. Do not assume that your employer recognises the value of your degree, after all there are a number of unique master’s programmes out there and you are not the only applicant for the job. The following are a few tips on how you can better market your master’s degree.

  • The Degree

The importance of education and selling the value proposition of your degree cannot be understated, thus it is important that you believe in the degree that you have worked so hard to earn.

Whether your degree is a specialised one or a generic degree, both can add value to an organisation. A generic degree helps students to see the big picture, to better see the various factors that come into play in the functioning of a department or the organisation. A specialised degree will help in distinguishing the applicant in todays competitive job market, equipping the student with specialised skills and knowledge to excel in a particular career profile.

  • The University/ College

 

Students today are no longer limited to getting an education from their local university or college, they can travel to any part of the world and attend any university for which they are eligible to apply. As a result, most employers might not be aware of the university attended or course completed. This provides you with the perfect opportunity to extol the virtues of your university, from your alumni network to the local/ global ranking, it could be anything that you are proud of and believe can make a positive impression on the employer.

  • Love what you learnt, do what you Love

In most cases, applicants (especially those who have returned to studying after working for a few years) would have completed their master’s programme in a subject that they feel passionately about. Which is why they have invested time and money in a programme that would not only improve their long-term career prospects in a field of their interest, but also increase their knowledge and skill in the subject they are passionate about. Don’t be afraid to let this passion be seen by your employer as it will give them a good indication of your enthusiasm and commitment to your field of interest. A passion that will only prove to be beneficial to the organisation.

  • What’s in it for me

Put yourself in the shoes of your employer. At the end of the day what it comes down to is tangibles – Sales, Production, Operations, Customer Satisfaction, etc., whatever the field, think how you can contribute towards the company’s bottom-line growth and it goals. Talk about the theories, principles and skills you learnt from the programme and connect them back to your prior work experience and the projects you completed. Impress upon your employer the skills and knowledge you can bring to the organisation because of your education, such as – flexibility and adaptability, time management, critical thinking and problem solving, presentation skills and research and writing, to just list a few.

Your commitment towards your studies, especially if you have good grades to back you up, is also a good indication of your commitment and will leave a positive impression with your employer.

Robert Kennedy College with 31 Master’s degree programmesand almost 14,000 students from almost every county in the world offers one of the most diverse, accredited and globally recognised online master’s degree programmes in both Business Law, Leadership and Management through exclusive partnerships with British universities. For more information download programme catalogue.

On behalf of the faculty and staff of Robert Kennedy College, I would like to wish all our readers a Very Happy and Successful New Year 2019!!