Robert Kennedy College and York St John University Graduation – Class of 2022

Tuesday, November 15th, 2022 – a rather unremarkable date, unless you have been invited to the York Minster in York to be cheered on by family, friends, and tutors, for achieving your Master’s degree. And boy, was this a remarkable day for those who could make it to York!

The third week of November is a great time of the year in York. We get to meet (or meet again) our students on a day of celebration of their efforts in a truly awe-inspiring venue – one of the largest Gothic cathedrals in Europe.

Weather is generally bad in November though – and Tuesday was no exception, with quite heavy rain in the morning, yet nothing could wipe the smiles off the faces of the hundreds of students getting gowned up and ready to walk into the Minster. RKC’s own were present in big numbers – more than one hundred graduates were in York, and so were we. We caught up with some of them and will be sharing their thoughts on the experience in a short series of posts in the near future, so stay tuned.

In the meanwhile, take in these smiles!

If you have had a dream of attending your own graduation ceremony and are looking to do a master’s degree, then have a look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might offer.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a RKC’s master’s student

As a former Education advisor, if I had to pick one of the most frequently asked questions by prospective students, it would be “How many hours do I need to study?”  

The vast majority (if not all) of our students are working and leading hectic professional lives. Some are motivated and have already decided to undertake a master’s, while others contemplate the unknowns of an online programme. In my experience, two things affect their decision the most.   

First – finances, and second, being able to strike the perfect work, study, and life balance. While I cannot completely help you with the finances (partially yes – check out the discount offers currently being offered on our online MBA, MSc, and LL.M programmes), I thought what I could do to help was to bring some facts to light about the other unknowns – what does a typical day in the life of an online master’s student look like?  

Today, we’re looking at overview of one of RKC’s student typical day who is taking MBA Learsership and Management, offered in exclusive partnership with York St. John University.

An Introduction  

Which programme did you choose and why?  

I am studying MBA Leadership and Management. I chose it because I am a finance professional but work with the Operations unit which oversees the running of the office. And leadership and Management skills are required be able to manage people.

The Study Plan   

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?  

The course is conducted online. I mostly study on weekends and sometimes week days in the office when everyone has left. I usually listen to lectures and make my own notes from them. In total, I put in more than 10 hours a week, as I also have to do research and listen to the videos over and over, alongwith reading relevant text books.

 What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

On weekends I would study early mornings and also late evenings. On weekdays, I preferred studying late evenings after work in the office when everyone would leave. I usually stay back for at least 2 hours.

In total, I put in more than 10 hours a week

How much time did you devote for each assignment?  

Quite some time you need to do proper research and also understand your subject matter for you to be able to get a pass mark. So I had to drop out some social commitments and devote more time to my studies.

Travelling and Communication  

Did you travel for work? How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

I am studying online so travelling did not impact me.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

There was a module that required a group interaction and my fellow students lived in two different time zones. But we were able to agree on a time that we could meet. Time differences did not affect my interaction with my professors as they always responded to me in time and they could be reached whenever need be.

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

A typical day for me starts early at about 5:30am on weekends with me going to our OnlineCampus listening to videos and reading the online materials. On week days it also starts at 5:30am and getting ready for work. I usually work till 6:00pm and after I finish, would study for 2 hours, sometimes more in the office.

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

The best advice I can give to students is

1. Find a time in the day for up to 2 hours that you can concentrate on just your studies

2. Reduce social activities especially if you are working and studying at the same time

3. Try to ask a lot of questions to your professor if you don’t understand the instructions given for an assignment. I had to retake a module because I misunderstood the instruction.

4. Find a fellow student within the course you are doing, with who you can discuss few topics for better understanding.

5. Learn to submit assignment 2-3 days before the deadline. You might get unexpected internet challenge uploading your assignment at the last minute and miss the deadline by few minutes which will make you get a capped mark.

 

Guochang used reading tools, as Acrobat for reading, Zotero for note…

All right, so this was a sneak peek of a typical day in  life as a master’s student. I hope you find it insightful and informative and that it gives you an idea of what to expect when you enrol for our master’s programmes. Watch this space as we have many more interesting insights always! 

Graduation Ceremony – To go or not to go?

Let me start by clarifying, at least for those who don’t know, it is not mandatory to attend the graduation ceremony to be awarded your degree.

You have worked hard for your degree, completed all your assignments and submitted your dissertation, meeting all the criteria for completing and being awarded your degree. And not being able to attend the graduation ceremony will not deny you your degree. The graduation ceremony is just that, a ceremony. The ceremony celebrates the successful completion of your degree programme and marks the start of the next phase of your life/career.

The University of Salford, UK – Summer Graduation – Class of 2018

So, should you attend your graduation ceremony? Well, it is a personal choice. The internet is filled with vlogs and stories of people choosing to go or opting not to attend the ceremony. Unfortunately, I did not attend either of my graduation ceremonies (graduate and master’s). Both times, not by choice. I don’t regret it now; it was a long time ago. And I don’t think I regrated it back then, apart from the fun photo ops and wearing the robs and the funny hat. I would have loved a photo looking like a graduate celebrating my degree.

But the ceremony is important. Case in point, every year, a number of our (Robert Kennedy College) graduates fly from all over the world to attend the graduation ceremony at the university in the United Kingdom (UK). They spend a lot of time and money to participate in the ceremony – travel, stay and socialise. They do this because they see value in attending the ceremony.

York St John University, UK, Graduation – Class of 2021 (RKC students can be seen getting the award at 45.17, 54.47 and 59.53)

The following five points might give you some insight in helping you decide on whether or not to attend your graduation ceremony.

(1) Money

The bases of most decisions we make in our lives. Attending the graduation ceremony can be a significant financial commitment, especially if you are staying or working in another country. You will have to arrange a visa, for which you might have to travel to the embassy/consulate. Plan your travel to and stay in the university town, which is not a minor expense—changing your wardrobe to meet the requirements of the graduation ceremony—keeping a budget for food and other social activities. If you have family travelling to attend your graduation ceremony, you must budget for them all these expenses. These expenses could lead to a substantial financial outlay, so plan for it well.

(2) Time

Our regular readers know how much we stress the importance of effective time management. You must take time off work, time away from your family, and time away from regular life. While making time to attend your graduation can impact the normal working of your life, it can also be just what the doctor ordered. The graduation ceremony will be a joyous time; it will help you remove your mind from life’s worries. And if you can extend your trip into a proper holiday, you will recharge your worn energy and can return to your regular life with a bang!

(3) Networking

While attending the graduation ceremony is a time for celebration, it can also be an opportunity to expand and solidify the networks you have made. You will not only have the chance to meet your professors and coursemates face-to-face to build on the networks you have already created but also meet with the staff and students of the university, which can provide you with new opportunities to network.

(4) Travel

A number of our students use the opportunity of attending their graduation ceremony as a getaway. We all get so caught up with work and life that we forget to take a break; we keep pushing that long cherished and overdue holiday. So, since they are already travelling to another country to attend the graduation ceremony, they make it into a holiday, most of whom travel with their families. And the hardcore workaholics of our students find a way to squeeze in a few business meetings.

(5) Celebration

Gregory Foster at his graduation at the University of Cumbria, UK – Class of 2018

At the end of the day, your graduation ceremony is a celebration. It might be fulfilling a lifelong dream of earning a master’s degree. It might be the end of one chapter of your life and the start of another. It might be the opportunity for a new career or the advancement in your current job. Or it might just be a celebration of the hard work and long nights you put into earning your degree. Whatever your reason, the graduation ceremony is a time of joy and celebration, whether by yourself or with your friends/classmates/family. So, have fun, takes photos and proudly wear that funny hat!


Hopefully, these points will help you decide on the importance of your graduation ceremony and if you will regret not attending your ceremony. If you have any suggestions or thoughts on the impact that attending the graduation ceremony can have, please share them here.

If you are hyped about attending your graduation ceremony someday, consider joining our globally recognised master’s degree programmes. Look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might offer.

FIVE signs that you are ready for master’s studies

Sometimes we do not know what we want in life. How do we change our plans into actions to develop our careers? When is the best time to enrol for a master’s programme?

As it is said, opportunity knocks only once. And when opportunity knocks on your door, always be willing to take a chance. You never know how perfect something could be or when the next opportunity will arise.

Sometimes instead of waiting, you have to create the right opportunity for yourself. One should look for the universe’s signs pointing to any arising opportunities.

One such opportunity is receiving higher education. Studying for a master’s can be a life-changing event and sometimes even the best decision one can make. While it may sound great and exciting, studying for a master’s requires a unique kind of resilience, commitment, dedication, and drive to complete the programme. Time-sensitive assignments, group discussions, researching, dissertation submission – your strengths will be tested on many levels.

Photo credit: Pexels.com

Whether a fresh undergrad or a seasoned professional, the decision to start a master’s is always excruciating. But here are five signs that you are ready to take the leap:

Stagnation in current career/job role

Working in the same role and doing the same job every day becomes mundane. Self-motivated people feel less challenged at work, and their level of job satisfaction declines drastically. Studying for a master’s brings new focus and challenge to an otherwise dull routine.

You have clear goals 

You always wanted to obtain a prestigious master’s degree and add another feather to your hat. Some people plan and define their career path in an early stage of their life, knowing exactly when they will start working, when they will study for their master’s, get married and even when they will have a baby.

You are ready and keen for the academic challenge

Despite busy work and home schedules, you are an avid reader and keep yourself abreast of the latest happenings worldwide. You have been actively researching the field you want to study for your master’s, reading textbooks, and reaching out to current students and alums to understand the academic challenge a master’s programme poses.

You want to network with like-minded people

One of the benefits that most master’s students look forward to is growing their professional network. Students from all over the world, with varying professional experiences, from different cultures come together to study for a master’s degree. Peer relationships formed during the master’s programme over group discussions, or forum chats, usually last a lifetime! This brings an opportunity to create a truly enriching academic experience.

You are ready for the time investment

Sometimes people keep the idea of studying for a master’s at bay simply because of time constraints. Job, family, and social commitment abstain you from committing yourself to the study environment. When you are focused on developing yourself academically and have set aside time, it is the right time to enrol for a master’s programme.

So, in summary, a desire to learn more, earn more and advance more could be your sign to enrol for a master’s programme today.

If you feel this is the right time for you to do a master’s degree, then look at our list of 100% online master’s degree programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

Student Interview: Women in RKC – Darija Barrech

In one of our most popular blog series featuring our female students, we asked our students to share their experiences with us – the challenges of getting back to school, managing work and study along with family, and the unique challenges they faced being female students.

Darija is a graduate of our MA programme in Leading Innovation and Change (MALIC) through our exclusive partnership with York St John University, UK. This programme has been discontinued and reincarnated as a 100% online MBA programme in Leading Innovation and Change

“The MALIC program was the enabler to put all the puzzle pieces together that I had acquired in my working life. It made all things very logical and made me understand all the interactions even better.

I enjoyed the learning journey a lot! Since it is an online course, I really liked the freedom to learn in my pace and time.

The residency week was just great! Not only the learning but the people made it very special! It was wonderful to meet new friends from all over the world.

I cannot imagine any program to be more international than MALIC is! This aspect brings in fantastic personalities and perspectives.

Thank you to all who made this learning such a fun journey!”

Darija Barrech, Managing Director – Culcha gmbh, Zurich, Switzerland and an alumnus of Robert Kennedy College
Darija Barrech, Managing Director – Culcha gmbh, Zurich, Switzerland and an alumnus of Robert Kennedy College

An Introduction

Who are you, really (How do you define yourself? Professionally, personally?)?

My home is where my heart is. That describes me quite well. I am 1 of 4 children of my Croatian mother and my Pakistani father. I was born in Germany and grew up in Pakistan. At 15, I returned to Germany for further education. So maybe now you know why I ended up in HR :). I love people, I breathe change, I innovate, and I am culture… After heading HR for a multinational medical device company, I wanted to give some “fresh air” to my brain. I had been looking for a program for over a year. After completing MALIC, I founded my own company (www.culcha.world), where I consult organisations in the area of organisational culture, leadership and change. Since August 2017, I have been a mom of our daughter Aviva which is another BIG learning and blessing in life. For almost 10 years, my husband and I have been living in Switzerland – which is a lovely and beautiful country.

Getting back to education

Photo by Scott Webb on Unsplash.

Your story of getting back to do a Master’s degree

What was the driving force behind your enrolling for an online degree? Who inspired you? What motivated you?

After heading HR for a multinational medical device company, I wanted to give some “fresh air” to my brain. I had been looking for a program for over a year. My husband, who saw an advertisement for the MALIC program in an aeroplane magazine, made me aware of it. The program was THE PERFECT FIT for me. It was blended, and the topics were spot on.

What were the thoughts/situations/people/challenges holding you back from starting (if any)? How did you overcome them?

Nothing.

What surprised you the most when you started your studies?

One thing I had never anticipated or thought of while looking for a good program was the mix of students. We were around 40 students in my cohort and “only” 4 where from Europe – the others coming from all over the world! I really made friends for life!

Do you feel there are unique challenges women face when deciding to get back into education?

When I started MALIC, I was without children but in a challenging job. From today´s perspective, I can imagine starting a program like MALIC could be very challenging in terms of time capacity (if you have children). Of course, like everything in life, it’s a question of priorities. Another thought might be in the direction of other national/geographical cultures… I could imagine that women in certain geographies might have the wish to conduct such a program but do not have the financial or family backing to do so.

Getting the degree

Photo by Mohammad Shahhosseini on Unsplash.

The work to get the degree – what did you learn, how did you balance, what would you do differently

Which programme did you do? Why?

MALIC, the program was THE PERFECT FIT for me. It was blended and the topics where spot on. I liked the focus on change, leadership, culture, strategy and innovation.

What is the single most important thing you learned during the programme?

That I can learn everything, I want!

How did you balance work and studies?

Discipline and backing from my husband.

Any particular challenges to being a woman and studying online, or do you think all students face the same ones?

I do not see any particular challenges women face other than in time and/or culture/geography.

Life post-degree

Photo by Christopher Gower on Unsplash.

What changed, if anything?

What’s new in your life since graduating/starting your studies? Any visible impact already?

I feel very sure and am very curious about the topics. I still keep learning.

Anything you are doing differently now because of the things you learned?

My way of learning has changed. I have been more academic-driven since MALIC. I more often consult studies when evaluating a topic.

Do you feel that getting a Master’s degree or doing other online programmes can reduce gender discrimination in the workplace?

I don’t think it can.

Advice for other women

Or other students, really.

Imagine you could send a message back in time to your pre-degree self: what would it be?

Why didn’t I do it earlier?!

Imagine you could send an object back in time to your pre-degree self: what would it be?

My MALIC Degree 🙂

Closing thoughts

Anything else you would like to add that could help with the goal of increasing women’s participation/access to a Master’s degree?

Completing MALIC was not only fun and smooth due to the topics, but it just gave me so many AHA moments and it clicked so many things I knew from practical work. It was THE BEST thing to do for me! Of course it is not easy doing such a program next to full time work, family, kids,…. BUT it is worth every minute spend. Professionally I grew by doing MALIC. I founded my own company (www.culcha.world) where I consult organisations in the areas of culture, leadership and change. While being on the residency week in York, we had the opportunity to see the graduates (a year above us). This picture was THE motivator for me to continue and keep on learning when times got tougher.


If this blog has motivated you to challenge yourself and do a master’s degree, then have a look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a Robert Kennedy College master’s student

Here’s another gem of our #dilo (a day in the life of) series featuring our students. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions and give feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning.

Learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student! Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am an ambitious 40 (soon to be 41) year old woman, juggling a very demanding job while trying to maintain a healthy lifestyle and continually developing myself on a professional level.

Which programme did you choose and why?

MBA Coaching, Mentoring and Leadership. I manage the HR function of a law firm, and I thought this programme would give me added skills which I can use in my current role.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I tried to watch all the videos and do as much reading as I possibly could during the first three weeks. I always aimed to start writing by week 4. A great piece of advice I got was, “Just start by writing sentences. The more you read, the more you’ll be able to articulate your ideas”. I found the advice to be very true and a good strategy. I would say I dedicated an average of 20 hours a week approximately.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

I would stay a couple of extra hours in the evening at work and dedicate that time to my studies. I found that to be easier than coming home and starting again. On the weekends, I would typically dedicate mornings to studying.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?  

I honestly cannot quantify that. One particular assignment required a lot more time than others, as it required a lot of practice. So I would say that I dedicated as much time as I could depending on the requirements for each module.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Travelling and Communication  

How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

My work does not require me to travel, so it was a matter of ensuring that any holidays would be planned in a way that they would not interfere with my studies.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

The online platform makes this pretty easy. Professors are usually quick in replying. I think the residency in York was an essential part of this programme because it made the whole experience real. You realise that most people are struggling with the same issues as you, and keeping in contact with several peers (mainly via Whatsapp) has provided a great support network, especially during dissertation!

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

Go out for a run first thing in the morning before getting ready for work (currently back in the office 3 days a week). Deal with everything the day throws at me. At the end of the working day, I either spend an extra couple of hours at the office to dedicate to my studies or go home. I would summarise it as busy; however, now that I am in the final stages of this programme, I can honestly say that I would do it all over again. Looking back, I can say that the past two years have gone by very quickly, and all the effort was well worth it.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

Always give yourself sufficient time to write your assignments, and don’t leave them until the last minute. Read, read and read, as that is the only way you’ll be able to write. If you have a block on some days, that’s fine, pick up the next day, and if you don’t know what to write, it means you haven’t read enough.


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been considering doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and answers to any questions you may have.

Benefits of networking at college and SEVEN tips on how to go about it

Like most young adults, my time at university was spent hanging out with friends and doing the bare minimum to get through the programme. Unfortunately for me, apart from my friends, I interacted very little with my other classmates, alums, and professors. I was friendly and polite when spoken to but did little to leave an impression, positive or negative, on them.

Age and hindsight make all your mistakes more apparent, and my mistakes are so evident to me now.

With just a little effort, I could have made many more friends (some of them might have been lifelong), got a better job or formed future business partnerships. There are so many great examples of businesses formed from networks made at universities, such as Facebook and Apple, to name a couple.

Photo credit: By geralt from Pixabay on Canva

The following are seven simple ways to help you form your network and the benefits you could get from them.

(1) The professors

Photo credit: By Yan Krukov from Pexels on Canva

Unfortunately, some students view the professors as the enemy put on earth by a vengeful deity to torture the poor innocent students with assignments and tests. But the truth is that most professors are there to help and want to help, and most students have a good relationship with their professors. For students who show potential, professors have been known to connect them with alums they are in touch with and help the student get started in their careers.

(2) That classmate who always slept in class

Photo credit: By kanchanachitkhamma on Canva

Most students form some connection with their classmates. Regardless of how irresponsible your classmates might seem today, with time, things will change, as change is the only constant in life. And these classmates go on to build careers across various fields, and companies or even become entrepreneurs. If you have made a strong connection and network with these classmates, it will benefit both of you over time. But don’t limit yourself to only your class; if the opportunity is there to network with students from other courses, then don’t miss out on networking with them.

(3) Alums

I remember meeting with a difficult client a few years ago. My team had been struggling to close this client for a while, and for some reason, they could not do so. When I met with this client, after the initial introductions, we learnt that we had studied at the same college, which broke the ice. We reminisced about old times and the professors we had in common, it was indeed an enjoyable meeting, and we reached a mutually beneficial business understanding. Most universities/colleges try to maintain a good relationship with their alums as the relationship can be helpful for both of them and the college’s current batch of students. So, try to use this relationship between the alums and the college or even the professors with the alums and build a network with the alums.

(4) Social Media

Photo credit: By geralt from Pixabay on Canva

A game changer today, but unfortunately for me, it was in its infancy when I was in college (for those who know, something called Orkut used to be around then). But today, with sites like LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, with a professional profile, your reach can go well beyond your professors, alums and college mates.  

(5) Social Events

Evens like the graduation ceremony, residency, and other cultural events are excellent grounds for networking. You are exposed to a large group of happy like-minded people, and even a short conversation with someone could lead to the start of a networking opportunity.

(6) Job Fairs

Photo by Nguyen Dang Hoang Nhu on Unsplash

I think this is a subcategory of the above point, but job events are also an excellent opportunity to network, even if it might just be superficial. But with social media, a connection can be made quickly and passive. This network can work for you in the background without your active involvement; you will be able to view updates posted by them, some of which might benefit you sometime in the future.

(7) Make the first move

Don’t be afraid to make the first move. What is the worst that can happen? They say no, they are not interested in networking with you. But making the first move is not enough; you are not there to add them to your social media and give them your resume. It would help if you made an impression, however small, with the limited time you have to interact with them. Try and make your conversation interesting and engaging, something you could call back on when you connect with them in the future to recall their memory of you. If you are having trouble with the conversation, ask questions relevant to them; we all like to talk about ourselves!


Hopefully, these points will help you build a robust, professional and beneficial network. If you have any other tips that might help our readers improve networking skills, please share them here.

If you are ready to add to your network and, at the same time, increase your professional value with a globally recognised master’s degree, then take a look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might offer.

It is okay not to be perfect at work. Here are 5 reasons why!

As an interviewee, I distinctly remember being asked this question: What is your weakness? I am sure you would resonate with me and must have found yourself in a similar situation. As I would be ‘well-prepared’ for the popularly asked questions in a job interview, I would promptly reply – Perfectionism. Trying to be perfect at everything I do is my weakness.

Many of us believe that perfectionism is required to progress in our careers. Well, that notion is a myth, and we should instead not let perfection get in the way of our career progression. It is in your best interest not to let perfection become a barrier in pursuit of success.

With the advent of social media, perfectionism (and the pressure of it) has increased over the years. It is easy to make comparisons now, not only with people around you but also with people from across the globe. The world has shrunk, and there are practically no borders, thanks to social media and the internet. 

There is a thin line between setting high standards and perfectionism. There is a big difference between ambition (adaptive perfectionism) and what is commonly referred to as perfectionism (maladaptive perfectionism). Setting goals for yourself and working towards them proactively in a healthy way is good – however, the moment this becomes stressful and feels like a burden, know that you are going downhill. Then it becomes maladaptive perfectionism. Constantly holding yourself responsible and obsessive behaviour towards not making mistakes can have negative consequences.

Perfectionism limits your effectiveness and adds stress. Photo credit: Canva.com

According to a study by Hill, A. P., & Curran, T. (2016). Multidimensional Perfectionism and Burnout: A Meta-Analysis. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 20(3), “pure” perfectionist striving displayed notably larger negative relationships with overall burnout and symptoms of burnout. In terms of moderation, in some cases, perfectionist striving were less adaptive, and perfectionist concerns more maladaptive in the work domain.

Perfectionism has negative consequences – here’s how.

It is crucial that you understand how perfectionism has negative consequences and holds you back. Beyond a point, perfectionism becomes demotivating. When unattainable standards are set, self-doubt creeps in, leading to reduced engagement. You’ll get farther if you embrace your limits and do your best. With this alternative, you’ll be able to invest energy in your responsibilities and relationships, and in turn, people will feel good about working with you.

Rather than incremental improvement, perfectionism becomes a recipe for stagnation. Photo credit: Canva.com

Perfectionism also limits your effectiveness. Since you are so focused on perfection, you tend to ignore the mistakes, learn the lesson from those mistakes and improvise. Rather than incremental improvement, perfectionism becomes a recipe for stagnation.

While you may think that a perfect person must be popular amongst management and admired by peers, surprisingly, it is quite the contrary in reality. Overwork and overthinking become your hallmark. It will be difficult to trust a perfectionist who is more intimidating than welcoming. People would rather not work with you as they will feel pressurized by unrealistic, unattainable expectations.

Perfectionists are usually lonely overworking. Photo credit: Canva.com

Strive for excellence rather than perfectionism

If you want to better your chances of making career progression, identify what kind and level of perfectionism you are. When you realize you are inching towards maladaptive perfectionism, know it’s time to steer clear of the oncoming negative consequences and move towards adaptive perfectionism.

Instead of striving to be perfect at your job, focus on being happy. The happier we feel at work, the more productive we are, which can lead to fantastic career opportunities in the future.

Here are 5 reasons why it is okay not to be perfect at work:

1. Strike a balance

Research shows that half of workplace absences are due to stress and mental illness. Focusing too much on being perfect at your job can severely impact your well-being, professionally and personally. The sooner you accept that there’s only so much you can achieve in a working day, the better. Putting unnecessary pressure on yourself to achieve only the best results can be counterproductive.

2. Learn from others and your own mistakes

When you are not busy being perfect and tunnel-visioned, you will be surprised to see how much you learn from colleagues, junior or senior. Plus, the less time you spend perfecting your work, the more time you have to build positive relationships with your colleagues.

Always remember, to err is human. Photo Credit: Canva.com

3. Less pressure and stress

The less pressure you put on yourself to be perfect at your job, the less you’ll worry about making mistakes. There is always pressure to achieve targets, make profits, expansion plans and so on. You are more prone to make mistakes when there is so much at stake. Always remember, to err is human. It is essential here to learn from those mistakes and not stress about them.

4. Get more done

According to research, the average worker puts in 10.1 overtime hours per week. That’s the equivalent of 469 hours per year! Plus, only one in 10 did so because they loved their job. When you are not stressing about unrealistic targets and deadlines, you will realize how you make time for other (maybe more) important things in life. It could be pursuing a hobby, fitness goals, spending time with friends and family, or travelling. It is crucial for a healthy mind and body and overall well-being.

5. Perfectionism lies in the eyes of the beholder

Understand the true meaning of perfection. It is essential to set priorities whenever you take a project in hand. Setting realistic targets will make you achieve them relatively quickly and feel happier and content. The accomplishment will pave the way toward taking on more tasks and responsibilities.

In a nutshell, excellence is undoubtedly linked with career advancement, but perfection is not. For all kinds of reasons, perfection can limit you—in terms of your performance, relationships, happiness and well-being. No human is perfect, but you can reimagine “perfect” as embracing your imperfections.

Outside the interview, would I call myself a perfectionist? I don’t think so. I always try to achieve the standards I set for myself, or even higher when possible. Furthermore, I follow the mantra, “Work to Live and not Live to work”. What is your mantra at work? Please share in the comments below.

FIVE Benefits of studying for a degree in International/Global Management

In today’s global economy, we take international brands/companies setting up shop locally for granted. And for most of us, it does not matter what went on behind the scenes to enable that company/brand to choose a location.

Today’s global economy with multinational brands. Photo by Nik Shuliahin 💛💙 on Unsplash.

There are many challenges and considerations that a company takes into account when opening any new location, especially when opening a new international location.

A programme in international business will help students develop key skills in various business disciplines, such as supply chain, human resources, marketing, finance, etc., within a global context, thereby helping students gain a global perspective to be successful in business.

Most of Robert Kennedy College’s (RKC) 100% online programmes focus on the international aspect of business management. The following are five reasons why you should consider doing a programme that focuses on the international aspect of business management.  

1. An international perspective

Photo by Nadine Shaabana on Unsplash.

Businesses face many challenges, but when viewing these challenges with a global lens, each of these challenges takes on characteristics that are unique to the country. The programme will better prepare students to tackle these challenges, giving them the knowledge to understand different perspectives and problem-solving skills with a broadened worldview. Another advantage of doing a programme with a global context is the knowledge and skills learnt can easily be used when managing local businesses as well. 

2. Learn new skills

Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash.

Like any graduate programme, students will gain new knowledge and skills. But unlike a typical graduate programme, a student in international business management will learn skills that are dynamic and useful in various environmental and economic conditions. Skills that will help students integrate with organisational and operational structures that differ significantly. Apart from mandatory skills any manager would require, such as presenting and reporting, students would also learn skills such as communication, leadership, strategic thinking, etc., from an international business point of view.

3. Global workforce management

Photo by Alex Kotliarskyi on Unsplash.

Effective management of the workforce can be complex in the best of times. However, this difficulty increases manifolds when you consider a multinational organisation. Not only will managers have to consider local sensibilities when formulating a policy, but the decisions made when hiring or layoffs can significantly impact the local economy. Students will learn to examine the changing nature of organisations in a global context and understand whether an organisation’s policies and practices can genuinely be global or if national and cultural sensibilities must be considered.

4. Business practices

Students will learn the theory of cross-cultural interaction and different cultural identities and see how these influence management practice in ethics, leadership, decision-making, communication and negotiation. Students learn to conceptualise ethics, responsibility and sustainability in diverse global settings and develop an insight into the expanding role of sustainable development, corporate governance, responsible business practice and the ethical dimensions of organisational policies and procedures. 

5. Become more employable

Photo by Cytonn Photography on Unsplash.

The most crucial point for any student. Most businesses today are multinational, looking to go multinational or have partnerships with vendors in other countries. The skills students learn from a programme in international management will make them very employable. And even if organisations are not looking to go global or have only local business partnerships, the skills learnt from a programme like this will be just as valuable as those with a more traditional business degree.


Hopefully, these points will help you better understand the value of a degree in international/global management. If you have already completed a degree in international/global business management, please share your experience and the benefits you got from the degree. I am sure our readers would appreciate and benefit from it.

If you have been thinking about doing either a BA, MBA, MSc or LLM degree with an international/global twist, look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing. 

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

Daniel Blackburn, University of Salford LL.M student, wins African Excellence Award 2022

Our students come from different walks of life. Robert Kennedy College (RKC) takes pride in being a truly international college, with over 7000 students from 140 countries.

Our 100% online programmes have been designed for busy managers. Our students and alums work for many international organisations and top companies from all over the world. 

Let me introduce one of the RKC’s proud students – Daniel Blackburn. Daniel is the owner and Managing Director of Blackburn Consulting (Pty) Limited, based in Beau Vallon, Mahe, Seychelles, and is an LLM student. Daniel is currently enrolled in the LL.M International Commercial Law programme offered by the University of Salford (UoS). Daniel chose this programme because he wanted to improve his legal knowledge to become a legal consultant and an expert witness.

Apart from balancing his busy study schedule and demanding professional life, Daniel also participated in the African Excellence Award 2022 to showcase the strength and success of his consultancy in their field of business. 

And based on various judging criteria of business performance, longevity, sustained business growth and innovation, Daniel’s firm Blackburn Consulting (Pty) Limited won the “Best Project and Contract Management Company Seychelles” award.

Thrilled with this achievement, Daniel is chuffed about the recognition and brand exposure his firm will achieve, attracting new customers and employees wanting to work with the best in the industry. 

As the winner of the “African Excellence Awards 2022”, Daniel was also invited to take part in the “Africa’s Business Heroes’ Competition”.

About his study experience with Robert Kennedy College, we asked Daniel to tell us more about a typical day as an RKC student.

Daniel has so far completed two modules with success. Each module comprised two assignments, a group assignment and an individual assignment. He devoted 15 to 20 hours per week towards his studies; however, more during his preparation for the assignments (approx. 35 hours). Daniel would spend time early in the morning for studies and then again in the evening. Daniel said, “When I wake up every day, the first thing I do is to check my inbox to see if there is any news in connection with my ongoing course, check the tutor’s posts/guidelines and other information such as classmates’ discussions and forums”. 

Daniel Blackburn with ABH logo

Regarding online learning, Daniel says RKC has an effective communication platform, allowing students to contact and receive replies from their tutors/student care/ administration. “For example, if I have any questions or clarifications on any subjects, I always contact my professors by ‘direct questions to the tutors’ or email the student care, and I usually receive the reply within 2 to 3 days.”

Further, Daniel shares that the professors/tutors are proactive course leaders and high-calibre persons. They uploaded several video lectures and a list of helpful reading materials from reputable authors to facilitate the students with their studies.

“During the discussions in forums, I was fascinated with very high-ranking classmates.

This kind of interchange with classmates in forums is fruitful and seen as reflection-on-action, that is, being open to new ideas. Through it, for example, my practice is developing and remaining vibrant. Working on a group assignment helped me learn a lot and discover my weaknesses. 

Group and individual assignments enhance my legal knowledge to tackle daily problems/situations (i.e. putting what I learned into practice).”

Based on his experience thus far, Daniel advises current and potential RKC students: 

“If you really want something, you’ll make time for it. Prioritise your time to meet your goals. Successful students always focus on the tasks at hand. No doubt time management can help students prioritize wisely and set goals correctly and a set time limit to complete all the tasks/activities.”

A truly inspirational and motivating life story of one of our students, driving success in his career. I am sure you feel inspired enough to take that plunge of investing in education, investing in your future, investing in yourself!

Chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer and the application process. For information on discounts, we might be offering at this time.