Practice what you learnt

As human beings we are always in a state of learning and as a professional, learning and self-improvement is the cornerstone of success. Today, professionals have a number of avenues opened to them for learning, whether it is through a structured educational setting like online education or through short term courses and seminars or learning informally through reading and research.

While learning and absorbing information is important, the point of the whole thing is lost if you are not able to put into practice what you have learnt. The following are a few suggestions of how you can go about putting into practice what you learnt.

  • Learn relevant: Before joining any programme, it is important for you to identify the reason behind undertaking this learning, both short and long term. Identify how this programme will contribute not only towards your continued professional growth but also the learnings that can hasten your professional growth.
  • Play to your strengths: As a professional, I am sure by now you are aware of both your strengths and weaknesses, what works towards helping you successfully complete your projects in the least possible time. Let your strengths work for you, identify what you have learnt that is in-line with your strengths and if it is relevant to your project use your learnings to your benefit.
  • Feedback is important: One of the most important aspects of examinations and tests is to give feedback to students. To identify the areas where a student is weak so that the student can get assistance in improving in those areas. When working on projects for your organisation and implementing the theories you learnt to practice, try to implement a method of getting feedback in order to refine your implementation. Share your theories, challenges and strategies with a colleague or a former classmate, someone you feel is knowledgeable or a subject matter expert who will be in a position to guide you through feedback.
  • Skill development: Every new theory you learn is a skill and like all skills, it will grow with time, experience and more learning. Practice what you learn and keep a track of its growth, if your skills are not growing then you are not learning. Attend new advanced courses and continually supplement your learning to enhance your skills. Schedule a plan to periodically evaluate your skill growth, set goals where possible to ensure that there is a progression in your learning and keep moving the benchmark, you will find that your career progress will more often than not parallel your skill growth. And always keep an eye out for new learning opportunities and development of new skills. Learning is growing.
Group photo of RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

Group photo of RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

  • Phycological, is all: As the saying goes, “it is all in the mind”. Put yourself and be open to new learnings. Don’t get disappointed if you are unable to connect what you have learnt with what you are doing, learning is never a waste of resources. If you are unable to connect what you have learnt with what you are doing then may be all you need is to develop a new skill that will bring it all together or just patience, the project that might require the skills you have already learnt and developed might just be around the corner.
  • Mentor: Finding a good mentor can go a long way in bridging the gap between theories and practice. A good mentor can help you get a clearer understanding of the theories you learnt and at the same time guide you to better implement your learning into your projects. A good mentor can also be your best source for feedback.

  • Learn through mistakes: As will all things, theories can only take you so far, the best way of learning is doing what you learnt. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes but don’t forget to learn from them.

Robert Kennedy College with 31 Master’s degree programmesand almost 14,000 students from almost every county in the world offers one of the most diverse, accredited and globally recognised online master’s degree programmes in both Business Law, Leadership and Management through exclusive partnerships with British universities. For more information download programme catalogue.

Attitude or Aptitude?

In my last blog, I talked about Entrepreneurship in modern times. It encompassed the various factors that led to the rise of entrepreneurship and why being your own boss is rather beneficial than working for someone else. However that made me thinking, what really makes a good entrepreneur? Having being said that the economic, political and social environment are pro-entrepreneurship and new businesses, not everyone is doing it. And not everyone who tried it, tasted success. There could be many reasons for the failure – wrong product, not the right market, not enough marketing, competition etc. But if I narrow it down to the Entrepreneur themselves – would be right to say – success/failure really pivoted upon the entrepreneur’s Attitude. Failure is actually a learning curve for any individual or organization. As Thomas Edison rightly quote, “ I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work”. This is where ‘Attitude’ comes into play. An entrepreneur with the right attitude never gives up! Most successful entrepreneurs, including James Dyson, Walt Disney, Vera Wang and Steve Jobs, failed several times before winning big. Steve Jobs was even fired from Apple in 1985! Steve Jobs said, “ Don’t Let the noise of other’s opinion drown out your own inner voice”.

This holds true for the employees’ of the organization as well. Attitude Or Aptitude? Which is a more crucial trait in an individual; this has been a debate amongst employers, businessmen, financiers and entrepreneurs equally. However if recruiter or entrepreneur has to choose one, they would choose the person with the right attitude every time.

This approach is backed up by studies which have shown that our 80 percent of our success is based on our EQ, compared to 20 percent for our IQ. This means that aptitude only accounts for a paltry 20 percent of our success. It has become a famous recruitment phrase – “Hire for Attitude, Train for Skills” –  It is easier to train aptitude than attitude. While attitude is positive / negative / indifferent feeling towards a person, object, event or idea; aptitude is a competency to do certain kind of work. One can always develop, learn or harness their skills or ability to do things. It is really hard to change someone’s attitude, that one develops over years, with factors such as family, upbringing, peers, prejudices, media, social, educational, religious and physical factors, influencing attitude.

 

Also, it’s easier to overcome obstacles with the right attitude. Any business or organisation constantly faces new challenges and in such difficult times, its only people with right attitude, determination and resilience can envision and direct the company out of the corporate mess.

Always remember, Your Attitude not your Aptitude, will determine Your Altitude!

How to better market your master’s degree when applying for a job

Most master’s degrees will equip students with essential skills that are indispensable in the work place. But what most employers don’t realise or take for granted is that master’s degree also equips students with a higher level of skill, discipline and specialist knowledge needed in today’s highly competitive and global business environment.

Thus, the importance of properly marketing your master’s degree, highlighting specialised skills and knowledge learnt is vital in securing the career you seek. Do not assume that your employer recognises the value of your degree, after all there are a number of unique master’s programmes out there and you are not the only applicant for the job. The following are a few tips on how you can better market your master’s degree.

  • The Degree

The importance of education and selling the value proposition of your degree cannot be understated, thus it is important that you believe in the degree that you have worked so hard to earn.

Whether your degree is a specialised one or a generic degree, both can add value to an organisation. A generic degree helps students to see the big picture, to better see the various factors that come into play in the functioning of a department or the organisation. A specialised degree will help in distinguishing the applicant in todays competitive job market, equipping the student with specialised skills and knowledge to excel in a particular career profile.

  • The University/ College

 

Students today are no longer limited to getting an education from their local university or college, they can travel to any part of the world and attend any university for which they are eligible to apply. As a result, most employers might not be aware of the university attended or course completed. This provides you with the perfect opportunity to extol the virtues of your university, from your alumni network to the local/ global ranking, it could be anything that you are proud of and believe can make a positive impression on the employer.

  • Love what you learnt, do what you Love

In most cases, applicants (especially those who have returned to studying after working for a few years) would have completed their master’s programme in a subject that they feel passionately about. Which is why they have invested time and money in a programme that would not only improve their long-term career prospects in a field of their interest, but also increase their knowledge and skill in the subject they are passionate about. Don’t be afraid to let this passion be seen by your employer as it will give them a good indication of your enthusiasm and commitment to your field of interest. A passion that will only prove to be beneficial to the organisation.

  • What’s in it for me

Put yourself in the shoes of your employer. At the end of the day what it comes down to is tangibles – Sales, Production, Operations, Customer Satisfaction, etc., whatever the field, think how you can contribute towards the company’s bottom-line growth and it goals. Talk about the theories, principles and skills you learnt from the programme and connect them back to your prior work experience and the projects you completed. Impress upon your employer the skills and knowledge you can bring to the organisation because of your education, such as – flexibility and adaptability, time management, critical thinking and problem solving, presentation skills and research and writing, to just list a few.

Your commitment towards your studies, especially if you have good grades to back you up, is also a good indication of your commitment and will leave a positive impression with your employer.

Robert Kennedy College with 31 Master’s degree programmesand almost 14,000 students from almost every county in the world offers one of the most diverse, accredited and globally recognised online master’s degree programmes in both Business Law, Leadership and Management through exclusive partnerships with British universities. For more information download programme catalogue.

On behalf of the faculty and staff of Robert Kennedy College, I would like to wish all our readers a Very Happy and Successful New Year 2019!!

Entrepreneurship in modern times

Last decade has changed the business world manifold. Lot of factors contributed to the rapid growth of entrepreneurs. Financial crisis of 2007-2008 played a very important role in this sudden and rapid development. The recession brought with it changes that many took as blessing in disguise. Many talented employees (future entepreneurs) were laid off who started looking for new opportunities. The real estate went to all time low. The costs to do business, machinery, equipment, land, office rentals went down. That created an affordability for small businesses to thrive.  At the same time the internet and technological advancement were reaching new heights, propelling the growth of businesses. A new era of starting low cost internet-based businesses began. Businesses had all the resources on their finger tips and indefinite reach of internet, as a powerful tool, meant they could expand globally in short span of time. An entrepreneur, is defined as a person who organises and operates a business or businesses, taking on greater than normal financial risks in order to do so.  Many experienced professionals turned towards entrepreneurship to get rid of the rat-race. The newer and younger generation, was soon attracted to this new trend of entrepreneurship. They witnessed the success of other entrepreneurs and opportunity that the new tech-savvy, social media based audience had to offer.

RKC Alumni and MeetVibe founders – Mircea Baldean and Carol Aebi, joined by co-founder Gabriel Paun (left) at Web Summit 2017

Not only the business environment and circumstances were congenial to entrepreneurship, but the new generation was looking for more satisfied and meaningful careers. Managers, who wanted to manage their own business, work on innovative ideas, earn profits for themselves and have a better work- life balance. The business world has seen  entrepreneurs emerge in all walks of life, showcasing that rags-to-rich is not a dream far-fetched.  Entrepreneurs like Steve Jobs and Bill Gates in technology, to Oprah Winfrey and J. K Rowling in entertainment industry, to Jack Ma, co-founder of world’s largest e-commerce business; set new influence and inspire millions of people towards entrepreneurship, where you are your own Boss. There are several advantages of owning and running your own enterprise:

  1. Innovation: Bring your unique ideas on the table and set a new niche in the business world.
  2. Decision Making : As an entrepreneur you are responsible for decision making for all aspects of business.
  3. Profits: You are driven towards profits for the growth of your enterprise and also potential higher returns for your hard work to yourself.
  4. Work- Life balance: While establishing a business on your own can be a daunting process, it can eventually smooth out and you can enjoy more free time to yourself for personal development or furthering business.
  5. Business is your own asset: The entity you develop is your own estate, an asset that can be further inherited by your family. As an entrepreneur you not only build your own future, but your whole family’s.

We offer several entrepreneurship programmes, that will help shape your career and start your entrepreneurial journey. We offer Online MBA Entrepreneurship and Innovation. Download the catalogue to find more details about the programme.

University of Cumbria Graduation Ceremony

Last month, on a wet Wednesday afternoon, more than 350 RKC students (plus about ten students from other UoC institutions) graduated in the historic medieval Carlisle cathedral. Many of the graduates were there in person to collect their diploma from the Chancellor of the University, the Most Reverend and Right Honourable Dr John Sentamu, Archbishop of York. Some graduates had come from far away, and many were supported, often very enthusiastically, by family members who were not fazed by the poor weather.

Following the ceremony the new graduates socialised together and with their families and faculty members in a nearby hotel over drinks and dinner.

An RKC student, Gregory Foster, graduating with the MBA in Leadership and Sustainability received the university’s Postgraduate Student of the Year prize. Greg had come all the way from Australia to receive his degree and the award, and is shown below between (left to right) David Duffill of RKC, Caroline Rouncefield, Grace Hurford and David Murphy, all of the UoC.

RKC & York St John Graduation 2018

It’s that time of the year again, when I get to travel to York and meet a bunch of our students who have made it all the way! Graduation is a special event, and more so when it takes place in the gigantic York Minster.

There is no way to really convey the feelings during such an event, even with photos and video, but short of having been there, you will have to try!

Congratulations George and Sarah for all your hard work getting the programme started, and Nigel, Amir, Ann, Rinnah, Sasha, Rula, Tim, Naomi, Joseph, Juliana, Misheck, Hannes, Tina, Mark, Leah, Nicole, Ryanhardt, Mufta’U, Wisdom, and sorry we missed you in the photo Patrick, Seth, Chris, Juan and Macaria – and even sorrier you could not be there Luis, Dawnia, Asuncion, Nicolas, Kourosh and Marilyn.

RKC Graduation 2018 @YorkStJohn

RKC Graduation 2018 @YorkStJohn

I am thoroughly excited about continuing this great event in the years to come with all of you now in the York MBA programmes! Looking forward to more smiley photos and silly videos! CONGRATS YOU ALL!

More photos from the day:

Group photo of RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

Group photo of RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

Group photo of RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

Group photo of RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

Group photo of RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

RKC 2018 Graduation @YorkStJohn in the Quadrangle

P.S. stay tuned for some in-depth interviews with the graduates, sharing their challenges and tips and tricks for successful studies.

Statement of Purpose

In the last blog, we looked into the admission and qualification requirements for a successful application. Now we continue to explore, how you would fit into the university’s criteria of a suitable Master’s applicant. Another important aspect of your application is the ‘personal statement’. The universities attach increasing importance to the personal statement for shortlisting and finally selecting suitable candidates for their programmes.

Often the personal statements make or break your application’s success. A well written statement can secure admission or lead to denial. Therefore, you must pay utmost attention and thoughtfully draft your statement. Here are some pointers to help you write an ‘admission winning’ statement:

  1. It’s in the name – Statement of ‘Purpose’ – Present a convincing statement, about your purpose and intent for applying to the selected programme at the University. The statement should clearly indicate that not only you are eligible to enrol and but will also prove to be a valuable contributor to the programme. Keep clear focus.
  2. Tailor the statement specific to the University – As in a job interview, candidates are asked why they would like to work with the company; similarly you must include in your statement of purpose, the reasons for choosing the University and applying to it and how the university is a right fit for you. 
  3. Simplicity is the best policy – Whilst you may feel pressing need to include jargons, sophisticated vocabulary words to impress the reader with your language skills. However a simplistic and straightforward  statement, works the best.

    4. Include only relevant accomplishments – Do not include your accomplishments spanning from       junior high school to undergraduate level. Highlight only those achievements that sync in with your interests and aligns well with your ambitions.

5. Quote..Unquote! – I would advise, stay clear from quotes. You may feel tempted to include a famous saying. It adds, practically, no value to your statement.

 

6. Watch the length – You don’t want your statement to sound like a drag. Always keep in mind, the admission committee has limited time, to read through and evaluate hundreds of application. Aim for a short and precise statement.

7. Be Yourself – The more the statement describes your actual self and intent, the better, The reader is interested to know your vision and ambition and not the idealistic statements. Stand out from the crowd with a powerful statement.

8. Last but most important – Proofread your document! – The statement of purpose represents You and it can be nothing short of Perfection! On the statement you are judged not only on your writing abilities but also on how serious efforts you have put in your statements. There is no scope of any grammatical or factual errors or misspellings.

 

 

 

Are you a suitable Master’s applicant?

As a former education advisor, this is one of the most frequently asked questions, I heard from potential applicants: ‘what is the admission criteria of the University’; ‘do I qualify to apply for the programme?’; ‘what is required in the statement of purpose?’. So, here are answers to all your questions. I aim to write this blog as a two part series; the first part, unravelling the admission and qualification requirements. And the second part would focus on what an ‘ideal statement of purpose’ should include.

Reflection session

Reflection session

As a student, I am sure you all do your homework well in researching about the University you would like to apply for the Masters’. You would like to enrol with a University that is accredited, offers wide choice of courses of your interest, competitive fees, great student support, an excellent alumni network; in short the best university according to your requirements. Similarly, University also looks for the best talent; students that can academically outshine and cope the challenging pace of Online Masters; their potential contribution to the programme and the fellow students. While no one factor can be a sole deciding factor, however all the aspects put together constitutes a successful application. Therefore, you can impress the admission officers with one, all or a mix of these following aspects:

  1. Academic excellence: This is the basic, first and foremost factor that all the universities would look at. Your previous qualification forms a basis for your Master’s degree and to a great extent an admission criteria. Many universities consider this as an elimination factor, to select the qualifying applicants. For RKC Online Programmes, minimum qualification is an honours degree at 2:2 or above. **                                                            
  2. The chosen subject – Your interest and passion towards the course: You must demonstrate your background in line to the chose Masters subject and your passion towards it that goes above and beyond what is required in the classroom. Perseverance is the key quality that that will get the attention of the admission committee.
  3. Work Experience: The Online Masters’ with its flexibility has become increasingly accessible to the working professionals. The working professionals bring a lot of real life experience on the table and enrich the programme value with their contributions. Hence, the number of years of experience of your resume will have a positive impact on your application. RKC has a minimum requirement of 2 years of work experience.

    RKC Alumni and MeetVibe founders – Mircea Baldean and Carol Aebi, joined by co-founder Gabriel Paun (left) at Web Summit 2017

  4. Ability to think, work independently and time management: While the Online programme offers flexibility and ease to study from anywhere in the world; it can be quite challenging to manage the study, assignments, work life and personal life. It could be quite a juggle. The university expects you, as a Masters student, to be able to efficiently manage the requirements of the programme.
  5. References: References are an important part of your application process. A reference could be your academic or professional references. Though professional (most recent) are considered to be the most favourable. A reference can tell a lot about the applicant :  maturity, character, leadership, self-confidence, warmth of personality, concern for others, and grace under pressure.
  6. Ability to work in groups: Ability to teamwork is important as well. Most of the course through RKC is conducted online with independent assignments to be submitted online itself. Some part of the modules taught in residency week require group discussions and assignments to be submitted on the basis of such group work. This ability will be reflected in your previous qualification or work experience (as team player or manager) or extra curricular activities. 
  7. English Language Ability: Since the course is fully taught in English, you will be evaluated for your English language skills, through various aspects – how well your resume is penned; formulation of the statement of purpose; verbal communication skills evaluated by education advisor. For admission with RKC, minimum requirement is: English language at IELTS 6.5 (minimum of 5.5 in each component). (This requirement could be waived, depending your previous qualification or experience in English speaking work environment- reference required –speak to our education advisor today for more information).
  8. Statement of Purpose: SOPs have increasingly become one of the most important deciding factors when evaluating an admission application. Its the summary of your past achievements and an insight of how motivated are you going forward. (more details on the next blog.. watch this space :))

 

Now that you have the insiders view of the application requirements, do not delay any further! Apply for your online Masters’ MBA and LLM and Online MSc programmes today and get started for the next intake.

 

 

**Applications are considered from candidates who do not meet the formal entry requirements but can provide evidence of equivalence. Examples of equivalence are:

  • A wide range of professional qualifications and/or work experience.
  • Working or studying in English or an English-speaking environment.

Applications will be considered from candidates who do not meet the formal entry requirements but who can demonstrate by interview the commitment to complete the programme successfully.

 

 

 

How to become a better Student

Going back to school is never easy, especially if you are a working professional and have to juggle a career and your personal life along with your education. But now that you have decided to go back to school, you might as well focus on becoming the best student you can be.

But what does becoming a better student mean to you? Have you sat down and really thought about it? Does it mean better – Work-Life-Study balance or better grades or a better understanding of what is being taught in class? No matter what your answer to the question is, the way to success is by creating effective habits.

The following are a few suggestions that could help you in achieving your goals.

  • The Scouts Motto – BE PREPARED

Time management is probably one of the biggest reasons why students fall behind or stay ahead in their classes.

    • Get organised – Organise your notes in such a way that it is easy to find when the time comes to refer to them.
    • Use a calendar, keep track of your class and fee payment schedules, know when your assignments are due and ensure that you complete your tasks before they are due.
    • Knowing your syllabus beforehand will go a long way in helping you prepare for a class. You will already have access to the study material before hand and by reading what is going to be thought in your next class you will get a better understanding of the subject when your teacher is explaining the topic. You will also be able to ask questions and clarify any doubts that was not clarified during the lesson.
  • Participate in Class

Active participation in class can have a number of positive impacts on your student life. Teachers notice to the students who are active in class and will in general  be more positively disposed towards these students. Don’t be afraid to raise your hands and ask questions, it is always better to come away from a class with a clear understanding of the subject.  And finally, take notes during class – it is the best aid that you can have during your revision of the subject.

 

 

  • Read

The best way to gain knowledge is to read. The more you read, the more you will know. If what you have read is related to your area of learning, the article, blog or book will give you a new point of view. Try to understand what the author is trying to put across and analyse if it falls inline with what you have learnt. Discuss your takeaways with your class and your teachers.

  • Complete your assignments early

The sooner you start work on your assignments, the sooner you will complete your research, the sooner the draft of your report will be ready. This will give you sufficient time to review your report and re-examine your conclusions. Get a friend or a classmate to read your report and ask them if there is any point that was not clear to them, you have the time to rework on the point, if you also feel it is required.

  • Do not procrastinate – A rushed job is seldom a good job.

When you choose a course, ensure its in the area of your interest so that you don’t regret your decision in the end.

Robert Kennedy College with 31 Master’s degree programmes and almost 14,000 students from almost every county in the world offers one of the most diverse, accredited and globally recognised online master’s degree programmes in both Business Law, Leadership and Management through exclusive partnerships with British universities. For more information download programme catalogue.

Dissertation – An Important part of your Masters’ Programme

A dissertation is a critical part of the masters programme, required for you to graduate. By definition dissertation means: “a substantial paper that is typically based on original research and that gives evidence of the candidate’s mastery both of their own subject and of scholarly method.”

There is a wealth of material on aspects of doing dissertation research, from working in a conducive physical environment, through planning and time management, to academic writing style. You may be well adept with researching and have a flair for writing; or could be like many other students, especially those who have little or no experience of producing an academic dissertation.

Outlined here are some of the key points that would help you write a dissertation worthy of ‘full marks’ leading you to your prized Master’s degree.

  1. Choosing a topic

A good start can give you a good finish. This is perhaps the first and most crucial step that you would be taking in the process of producing a good dissertation. There is a considerable literature on ways to decide on a topic, plan and write up a dissertation.

If you do not have any good ideas about a topic, contact your supervisor outlining some general areas, and ask for advice. Look at what other people have done, or in text books or articles, and/or talk to people in your organisation, and see if anything sparks off an idea, as can often happen. If you do already have concrete ideas, write them all down (do not discard any at this point – even ones which may seem not so good) and discuss them with your supervisor and professors.

  1. Constructing the plan

This is a very important exercise. Without a clear plan at the outset, you may find you have collected a large quantity of data with too vague an idea of what to do with it. Some students prefer to read around a subject-area while making extensive notes before constructing a plan. There are various ways of making a plan. Many people like to start with what is known as the Star system: a central idea with subsidiary ideas attached to it, as illustrated here. You begin with a central idea, then attach related ideas to it using lines, out to two or three levels (normally three levels at most, otherwise the diagram becomes unwieldy and even incomprehensible).

3.  Managing time

Time management is something you must have been dealing with right from the onset of the Masters programme. As you inch towards the final stages the course, you must be well aware of all the time management advises you have been given by friends, colleagues, professors, and even internet,  such as not working on your dissertation if you are exhausted, or ignoring something which seems to be distracting you while you work, or working with either background music or in silence depending on what you prefer to do (by the time you get to Masters-level research, it can surely be assumed that you know which you prefer).

 

  1. Data security

Apart from obvious good advice about keeping data well organised, as outlined above, keeping your data secure as well, isn’t really counted as a priority for many. But you will understand how it is of upmost importance to safeguard your hard work.  Do not trust your memory, however good you think it is. Keep complete records of everything you read. Keep a backup copy of all drafts and all notes in a separate location. Do not rely on a single computer. Back up to a removable hard disk or memory stick, or regularly write backups to a CD, or email them to yourself. There is almost nothing worse than the disaster of having lost weeks of work. Data recovery services are expensive and not always successful.

 

  1. Stick to the Basic structure

It is imperative the you follow a structure to pen down an effective dissertation write-up.

  1. Acknowledgements if appropriate/
  2. List of abbreviations.
  3. List of figures and/or tables
  4. Abstract or Executive Summary – normally no more than one page
  5. Introduction – not a description of a company, market etc., but an exposition of the hypothesis or hypotheses, and/or an explanation of the problem(s) or question(s) which will be treated.
  6. A critical review of the relevant literature, partly in order to show the examiner that you are familiar with other people’s work in the field
  7. The method(s) used for gathering the information, and a justification for your decision(s)
  8. The method(s) used for analysing that information and a justification for your decision(s)
  9. The analysis itself, which is often a statistical analysis (and if not, why not?
  10. Presentation of the results.
  11. The conclusions, judgements and/or recommendations (if appropriate) based on the evidence, plus (again if appropriate) suggestions for future research or business activities
  12. Appendix or appendices, if relevant.

 

These steps would assist you getting yourself started on the process. However at any stage, our esteemed professors are always there to guide you through.

 

Get registered for Online Masters today. Download the catalogue for more information.