DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student

Through the #DILO series of blog posts we have been bringing you insights into the life of our master’s students, sharing their thoughts and opinions, ups and downs, and key learning points during their online studies. The whole idea behind this series is to make you aware of realities of online studies, and help you in decision making.  

This week we take a look at a day in the life of our MBA student from University of Cumbria. Here is an insight and some words of wisdom from their own experience. 

An Introduction 

Which Uni are you studying with? 

University of Cumbria.

Which programme did you choose and why? 

Masters of Business Administration. I wanted the fluidity of the degree to be able to strategically move upward within organizations. 

The Study Plan 

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week? 

Prepare a study plan and pick a time of the day that works best for you

I followed the recommended guideline. I had some classmates who did the mandatory modules first, then took the modules that were aligned with their profession, but that would have prolonged the completion of the program.

I followed a mandatory two hours daily schedule, sometimes, three to four hours depending on the subject.

I would suggest however, to read through the course requirement at the beginning of the course to get an understanding of the requirement.

Begin early to draft the final assessment for the module and make revisions as the material becomes clearer.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?) 

Allow yourself enough time for each
assignment

Morning hours and weekends were more practicable for me.

How much time did you devote for each assignment? 

It depends on the subject. Some familiar subjects were easier and more interesting and those that were challenging got extra attention. Roughly 3-4 days per assignment, inclusive of research, rough draft and final submission.

Travelling and Communication 

How did travelling impact your ability to study? 

Initially, travelling impacted study times. It required major adjustment to after work schedule and infringement on family time. It really came down to prioritizing what was important at that particular time.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences? 

The interaction with the different time zones was a bit of negative factor for me. One had to keep in mind the time differences and make the adjustments.

A typical day as a master’s student 

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you? 

Getting up a little earlier to put in extra time, when it is quiet in the morning. Listening to podcast on related materials during breaks and the long drive home.

Any advice? 

Take advantage of every opportunity.

Make a structured daily schedule that includes two hours of daily studies. Break it up if necessary.

Most importantly during overwhelming and difficult periods… take a break.. take a deep breath… and start again.

Have a core group of people in the program that you can interact with, share and exchange information.

Well indeed, incredibly helpful advice. To get you through the master’s studies we have a great faculty who are subject-matter experts, guide and encourage the students to achieve their potential.  

If you have been dreaming of joining a master’s programme or have had this personal goal to gain a higher education, now is the time! Take the valuable advice from our current students, gain from their experience, add your own unique study strategies, and make your own success stories! I would love to feature you one day on our college blog. 

Chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, application process, and for information on discounts we might be offering at this time. 

DILO (A day in the life of) of RKC master’s student

Through the #DILO series of blog posts we have been bringing you insights into the life of our master’s students, sharing their thoughts and opinions, ups and downs, and key learning points during their online studies. The whole idea behind this series is to make you aware of realities of online studies, and help you in decision making.  

This week we take a look at a day in the life of one of our excited MBA student, on the way to complete the MBA programme. Let’s hear his experience studying for Master’s of Business Administration:

An Introduction 

Which Uni are you studying with? 

University of Cumbria

Which programme did you choose and why? 

I chose the MBA programme. I wanted the fluidity of the degree to be able to strategically move upward within organizations.

The Study Plan 

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week? 

I followed the recommended guideline. I had some classmates who did the mandatory modules first, then took the modules that were aligned with their profession, but that would have prolonged the completion of the program.

There was a mandatory two hours daily schedule, sometimes, three to four hours depending on the subject. I would suggest however, to read through the course requirement at the beginning of the course to get an understanding of the requirement.

Begin early to draft the final assessment for the module and make revisions as the material becomes clearer.

Prepare a study plan and pick a time of the day that works best for you

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?) 

Morning hours and weekends were more practicable for me.

How much time did you devote for each assignment? 

I would say it depends on the subject. Familiar subjects were easier and more interesting, those that were challenging got extra attention. Roughly 3-4 days per assignment, inclusive of research, rough draft and then final submission.

Travelling and Communication 

How did travelling impact your ability to study? 

Initially, travelling impacted study times. It required major adjustment to after-work schedule and infringement on family time. It eventually came down to prioritizing what was important at that particular time.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences? 

The interaction with the different time zones was tricky. One had to keep in mind the time differences and make the adjustments.

A typical day as a master’s student 

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you? 

Getting up a little earlier to put in extra time, when it is quiet in the morning. Listening to podcast on related materials during breaks and the long drive home.

Any advice? 

Take advantage of every opportunity. Make a structured daily schedule that includes two hours of daily studies. Break it up if necessary. Most importantly during overwhelming and difficult periods… take a break.. take a deep breath… and start again.

Have a core group of people in the program that you can interact with, share and exchange information.

If you have been dreaming of joining a master’s programme or have had this personal goal to gain a higher education, now is the time! Take the valuable advice from our current students, gain from their experience, add your own unique study strategies, and make your own success stories!

Chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, application process, and for information on discounts we might be offering at this time. 

Facing the Fear of Uncertainty and Embracing the Unknown

Life is an unpredictable journey, filled with unexpected twists and turns.

While some people love the thrill of the unknown, many become paralysed by dread. The fear of the unknown is a difficult roadblock that prevents us from realising our full potential and living life to the fullest. But with courage and resiliency, one may overcome this anxiety and embrace the unknowable. We’ll look at practical methods in this blog post to overcome our fear of the unknown and live happier lives.

Fear of the unknown is a roadblock that prevents us from realising our full potential

Recognise Your Fear

The first step towards conquering any fear is to acknowledge its existence. Recognise that fear of uncertainty is a normal human inclination and accept it. You may deal with this fear skillfully and constructively if you recognise it rather than suppress it.

Find the root cause.

Understanding the source of your fear will help you better understand why you’re afraid of the unknown. The past might influence this emotion, a lack of control, or a fear of failing. By recognising these triggers, you can confront them head-on.

Develop a Growth Mindset

Adopting a growth attitude is essential to overcome your fear of the unknown. Accept the notion that difficulties and ambiguity present chances for development and education. Consider the unknown an opportunity to broaden your horizons and acquire new experiences rather than a danger.

Develop mindfulness

You may stay grounded in the here and now by practising mindfulness, lowering anxiety about the future. Regular meditation and mindfulness techniques can train your mind to respond calmly to unexpected situations and become more at ease with life’s uncertainties.

Adopt a growth attitude to overcome your fear of the unknown.

Taking Baby Steps

Getting over your fear of the unknown doesn’t require you to make drastic adjustments right now. Begin by gradually stepping outside of your comfort zone. Expose oneself to novel situations, difficulties, and doubts gradually. Your confidence will grow, and your worry will lessen with each modest victory.

Visualize fruitful results

When faced with uncertainty, our minds frequently accentuate unpleasant scenarios. Visualising successful outcomes will help you overcome this temptation. Visualise yourself thriving and prospering in new circumstances. This encouraging visualisation lets you change your state of mind from dread to exhilaration.

Seek Assistance

Inform your support group, loved ones, or friends about your anxieties. Talking about your concerns can frequently bring relief and a new perspective. People that support and elevate you may be a great source of strength when things are unsure, so surround yourself with them.

Pay Attention to What You Can Control

By definition, we cannot control the unknowable. We always have control over our reactions and behaviours, though. Focus on the present and what you can do to prepare for the future rather than worrying endlessly about what might occur.

Study your past mistakes.

Think back to occasions when you overcame uncertainty and emerged stronger. Keep in mind your tenacity and the lessons you acquired. To tackle current uncertainties with renewed confidence, draw strength from those experiences.

Create a Supportive Schedule

Establish a regimen for the day that promotes comfort and stability. It can be simpler to deal with uncertainties when they come when your life is ordered and gives you a sense of control and certainty. Find things to do that help you feel grounded, and arrange them into your day.

Reframe failure as an opportunity for learning.

The prospect of failure is frequently what makes people afraid of the unknown. View failure differently by seeing it as a springboard for development and advancement. A lot of successful people have failed numerous times before succeeding. Accepting failure as a necessary learning component will make you more inclined to take risks.

Learn for Yourself

Fear can be effectively treated with knowledge. When faced with uncertainty, spend time learning about the circumstance or challenge. Knowing more about it might help you feel more confident and calmer whether you’re embarking on a new endeavour, moving to a new city, or anything else.

Set reasonable goals

When dealing with the unknown, it’s imperative to have reasonable expectations. Not everything will go as planned, and that uncertainty inevitably carries some unpredictability. Accept the possibility of hiccups; they are just a part of the journey.

Accept Flexibility

You must be flexible and ready to adjust to new circumstances to overcome your fear of the unknown. Recognise that adaptability is a skill and that life rarely happens as you expect. You can deal with uncertainty more graciously if you can adapt.

Salute Your Success

Celebrate and acknowledge the advancements you make along the road. Regardless of the outcome, every step you take to face the unknown merits praise. Any success is worth celebrating since it fosters good behaviour and promotes development.

Seek Professional Help

Consider getting professional assistance if your dread of the unknown overpowers you and interferes with your everyday activities. You can get helpful support and direction from a therapist or counsellor to overcome your concerns and create successful coping skills.

It takes time, self-compassion, and perseverance to overcome the fear of the unknown, and this path continues. By incorporating these tactics into your life, you can gradually gain the fortitude to face uncertainty with greater strength and resilience. Remember that anxiety about the future is acceptable, but don’t let fear prevent you from leading an exciting and rewarding life. If you embrace the allure of the unknown, you’ll discover that it opens up doors to opportunities and new experiences you never imagined were even conceivable.

The fear of the unknown can be a formidable force that hinders personal growth and happiness. Nevertheless, with a determined mindset and the willingness to embrace uncertainty, you can overcome this fear and open yourself to a world of possibilities. Remember that life’s most rewarding moments often lie beyond what is familiar, and by stepping into the unknown, you can discover a stronger, wiser, and more resilient version of yourself. So, take a deep breath, trust in your abilities, and embark on a journey of self-discovery and growth—one enriched by embracing the beauty of the unknown.

Do not let the fear of the unknown stop you from following your dream of pursuing a Master’s programme. Trust that it will be the most rewarding experience at the end of the programme. Take the first step and speak to one of our education advisors today. Conquer the fear of the unknown and embrace success.

#DILO (A day in the life of) of RKC master’s student

Through the #DILO series of blog posts we have been bringing you insights into the life of our master’s students, sharing their thoughts and opinions, ups and downs, and key learning points during their online studies. The whole idea behind this series is to make you aware of realities of online studies, and help you in decision making.  

This week we take a look at a day in the life of one of our MBA students, a pilot by profession and the one who addresses himself as a ‘transformation agent’. Let’s hear his experience studying for Master’s of Business Administration:

An Introduction 

Which Uni are you studying with? 

York St John University (UK) 

I chose the MBA in Leading innovation and change offered in exclusive partnership with York St John University

Which programme did you choose and why? 

I chose the MBA in Leading innovation and change : change is constant and without innovation, one can be knocked out or overran by change! 

The Study Plan 

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week? 

To be honest, it was like an adhoc system in the beginning..

Moreover, change of company, country and crazy flight schedules including night flights meant I had to search for what would work for me.

Prepare a study plan and pick a time of the day that works best for you

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?) 

Given the unique work requirements, studying early mornings or late nights had been virtually impossible owing to early flights or night flights.

Then I discovered I could do study while in cruise!

Long flights with extended periods in cruise became an interesting option…

How much time did you devote for each assignment? 

I usually could not set for myself a fixed time..often it was the fatigue levels from day and night flights that determined how productive I could be. It was chaos because I had flight exams at the new company that also had really demanding pass rates…(80%). Only the last of the four modules worked better after the work related chaos subsided.

Dr. Radu had a chat with me after failing the first module marginally. I had thought that balancing this chaos was stretching my capacities beyond the minimum required to pass. I had intended to put a stop to studies till a better time emerged. But, I am glad that I had the talk with Dr. Radu Negoescu…I kept going and never looked back.

Travelling and Communication 

How did travelling impact your ability to study? 

Travel brought more chaos into the works. I worked hard to bring order to it.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences? 

I communicated through WhatsApp! Fantastic…it can be lonely but when a group is available, fellow students share their challenges and give each other support.

A typical day as a master’s student 

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you? 

For a pilot, no day is typical. Cruising to different destinations means having to alternate study times when freshness is at its peak for maximum concentration. However during difficult times, I had to take a minimum an hour daily to either read or do a write up.

For the dissertation though, 100 words for 100 days was the least allowable minimums…instead of waiting until last days owing to the scope and research involved.

Any advice? 

There is no fixed working system. Everything is relative to one thing: one’s level of discipline!

If you have been dreaming of joining a master’s programme or have had this personal goal to gain a higher education, now is the time! Take the valuable advice from our current students, gain from their experience, add your own unique study strategies, and make your own success stories! I would love to feature you one day on our college blog. 

Chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, application process, and for information on discounts we might be offering at this time. 

Introducing the new MBA Open access module by York St John University

One of the most challenging decisions before venturing into a Master’s programme is – when to start. Most of us are so engrossed in our daily lives, trying to make a living, juggling family and work that the thought of starting a Master’s is often put on a back burner.

However, I feel when you fear the unknown, start small and take baby steps before taking the plunge.

This is precisely what York St John University is offering now in partnership with Robert Kennedy College.

Dr. iur. David Costa, Dean of Robert Kennedy College, explains the Online MBA Entry Module.

All you need to know about the Online MBA Entry Module

Why enrol in the entry module?

The online open access entry module is easy to get started with. It is a gateway to enrol for York St John University online MBA.

What is the duration of open access module?

You can complete the access module in as little as 3 months. The full MBA can be completed in 12 months.

What do you receive at end of the programme?

At the end of the programme, you will receive the University transcript from York St John University. You also will have the opportunity to continue to pursue Full Online MBA.

What is the fees for the programme?

1000 Swiss Francs (approx.  US$ 1079) payable in 3 monthly installments of 333 CHF. You can register and start with just 333 Swiss Francs.  If you decide to progress with the full York MBA the  1000 Swiss Francs Entry Module fee will be deducted from the full MBA fee. 

What are the steps to enrol and study the open access module?

Here are few simple steps to get enrolled and started:

  1. Register for Entry Module: Just one click and you can get started. Start your MBA with just 333 Swiss Francs
  2. Access to Online Campus: Once you pay the registration fee, you will receive access to OnlineCampus and University Library
  3. Study 100% online: The programme offers flexibility to view the recorded lectures anytime, anywhere.
  4. Submit assessments: Prepare for the assessments. Our Professors will assist you in preparing for your final assessment.
  5. And Finally… Start your MBA: After successful completion of the entry module, you can choose to continue with the MBA programme.

Still have more questions? Talk to one of our advisors live on WhatsApp to know more.

#DILO – (A day in the life of) a master’s student

The vast majority (if not all) of our students are working and leading remarkably busy professional lives. Some are motivated and have already decided to undertake a master’s, while others contemplate the unknowns of an online programme. In my experience, two things affect their decision the most.  

First – finances, and second, being able to strike the perfect work, study, and life balance. While I cannot completely help you with the finances (partially yes – check out the discount offers currently being offered on our online MBA, MSc, and LL.M programmes), I thought what I could do to help was to bring some facts to light about the other unknowns – what does a typical day in the life of an online master’s student look like? 

I asked a few of our students from different walks of life, occupations, and personal situations to answer a few questions on their study tactics and strategies, plans and reality, and so on. I thank each one of the respondents for taking the time to share their experiences and give valuable advice to you – possibly future students. In our ‘a typical day in the life of a master’s student’ blog series, we bring to you one of our real students or alumni sharing the insights.  

Today, we’re looking at one of our students journey, a busy professional being a CEO of an International NGO, who got only busier during and after Covid.  

An Introduction 

Which programme did you choose and why? 

MBA Leading Innovation and Change, because the “Aid industry” needs to innovate and change and I needed to learn so I could play a small part in that.

The Study Plan  

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week? 

Given my intense work schedule I chose to do the program over two years committing to 25 hours per week of study during the time actively enrolled in a module plus pre-reading between modules. It all went well for the first module and then I had to take a few years off due to a serious medical situation.

Since restarting It will took me two years to complete the remaining 3 modules and the dissertation. Time commitment on modules 25 hours per week average was close, albeit closer to 40 hours a week closer to deadlines.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?) 

Well, for me it was evenings and weekend, sometimes late evenings as late as 3am. I eventually understood that the studies cannot be done effectively in an hour or two at a time. It definitely needed longer periods of intense study.

How much time did you devote for each assignment? 

I took the 300 hours recommended very seriously in my planning (25 jours per week per module) In the end, I probably averaged 350-400 per module. There is so much reading to do and lots of great rabbit holes 🙂

Travelling and Communication 

Did you travel for work? How did travelling impact your ability to study? 

Immensely! My job involves me being all over the world 6 months out of 12 and this heavily impacted one module. I planned the best I could, but it was a huge challenge and in the end I had to get board permission to back off on some work commitments to ensure I succeed in my studies. Fortunately, my board is very understanding, I don’t think everyone would have that privilege. In the end, Covid slowed travel, but at the same time increased my workload very heavily.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences? 

I was so disappointed with the switch to an on-line residency because of Covid. Other than that, online interaction was fine and time differences were not a major issue for me.

A typical day as a master’s student 

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you? 

There was no typical day for me, intense travel schedules and work responsibilities made that extremely difficult. Some weeks I could not get more than a few hours and in other weeks I studied 60 to 70 hours.

Any advice? 

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies. 

Do not undertake this lightly. Be realistic in your planning, consider your work loads and travel schedules and make sure you build a realistic study plan around them. It takes huge discipline, you have to make it a priority and in doing so consider your family situation too. I am thankful that my wife understands how important this is to me and continues to support me throughout.

All right folks, this was a sneak peek of a typical day as a master’s student. I hope you find it insightful and informative and that it gives you an idea of what to expect when you enrol for our master’s programmes. Watch this space as we have many more interesting insights coming up! 

Education Leadership – It’s all about learning

Education serves as the foundation block of human society. It is a dynamic process, and education can be received from a variety of institutions all over the world. Education has seen numerous changes through the centuries and is an ever-evolving field constantly facing new challenges. Educational institutions aim at providing structured learning to develop knowledge and skills along with the holistic balance for overall growth, enabling the individual to lead a successful life. Various institutions operate to provide age-appropriate education to kids and adults.

Who is an education leader?

A leader in education is one that other educators look up to for guidance, direction, and example. An educational leader serves as a guide in an organizational setting. They operate either as sole leaders or as a team of education administrators. An education leader plays a pivotal role in determining the reputation and climate of the school. Learning communities function and thrive under the direction and vision of their leader.

What common traits make a successful (and influential) leader?

Unlike management leaders, the challenges that education leaders face are unique and diverse. There is no other industry with such constant learning as the education industry.

“Leadership is the capacity to translate vision into reality”

Education leader creates opportunities, supports processes and empowers educators. Here are some of the typical traits found in an inspirational, educational leader:

  1. An education leader is a lifelong learner
  2. An innovator, has vision and is a planner
  3. Expert in utilizing data and resources
  4. Leads by example
  5. They create collaborative, inclusive learning environments
  6. High emotional quotient and critical decision maker
  7. Has a positive and can-do attitude
  8. Excellent communicator and problem solver
  9. Empowers educators and promotes the development of leadership skills 
  10. Pivotal in community building and transpiring the values, philosophy, and ethos of the educational institution through the community

The list above is not exhaustive. 21st-century leaders operate in complex environments and are expected to be active facilitators of change.

“Change is an opportunity to do something amazing”

Education leaders must possess an in-depth understanding and knowledge of the communities’ learning requirements. In a heavily media-saturated society, the dynamism and rapidly changing education requirements are unpredictable. Still, education leaders are responsible for preparing learners for the future. Effective leaders tend to develop learning strategies focusing on the future while analyzing current education trends.

What leadership models are valid in education?

While various leadership models are adapted from the business world to the educational, theories and models regarding the role and function of education leaders have been reformed and remodelled to echo the change over time.

Here are a few of the leadership models applicable to the education sector:

Transactional leadership

Transactional leadership centres around rewards and punishments and these are made very clear from the beginning with straightforward job descriptions and expectations. The leader allocates work, and the subordinate is solely responsible for it.

Transformational leadership

This form of leadership allows dreams to take shape. A transformational leader develops a vision and implements it while taking care of their employees and giving them ample opportunity to succeed.

Servant Leadership

The servant leader puts the interest and needs of others first. The leader would share power, delegate, improve, and work for the benefit of the less privileged.

Laissez-faire Leadership

This leader’s involvement in decision-making is minimal because they allow people to make their own decisions. For this leadership style to be successful, the employees must have integrity and be self-driven.

Take a look at our list of 100% online master’s degree programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a Robert Kennedy College master’s student

Here’s another gem of our #dilo (a day in the life of) series featuring our students. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions and give feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning.

Learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student! Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am an ambitious 40 (soon to be 41) year old woman, juggling a very demanding job while trying to maintain a healthy lifestyle and continually developing myself on a professional level.

Which programme did you choose and why?

MBA Coaching, Mentoring and Leadership. I manage the HR function of a law firm, and I thought this programme would give me added skills which I can use in my current role.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I tried to watch all the videos and do as much reading as I possibly could during the first three weeks. I always aimed to start writing by week 4. A great piece of advice I got was, “Just start by writing sentences. The more you read, the more you’ll be able to articulate your ideas”. I found the advice to be very true and a good strategy. I would say I dedicated an average of 20 hours a week approximately.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

I would stay a couple of extra hours in the evening at work and dedicate that time to my studies. I found that to be easier than coming home and starting again. On the weekends, I would typically dedicate mornings to studying.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?  

I honestly cannot quantify that. One particular assignment required a lot more time than others, as it required a lot of practice. So I would say that I dedicated as much time as I could depending on the requirements for each module.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Travelling and Communication  

How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

My work does not require me to travel, so it was a matter of ensuring that any holidays would be planned in a way that they would not interfere with my studies.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

The online platform makes this pretty easy. Professors are usually quick in replying. I think the residency in York was an essential part of this programme because it made the whole experience real. You realise that most people are struggling with the same issues as you, and keeping in contact with several peers (mainly via Whatsapp) has provided a great support network, especially during dissertation!

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

Go out for a run first thing in the morning before getting ready for work (currently back in the office 3 days a week). Deal with everything the day throws at me. At the end of the working day, I either spend an extra couple of hours at the office to dedicate to my studies or go home. I would summarise it as busy; however, now that I am in the final stages of this programme, I can honestly say that I would do it all over again. Looking back, I can say that the past two years have gone by very quickly, and all the effort was well worth it.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

Always give yourself sufficient time to write your assignments, and don’t leave them until the last minute. Read, read and read, as that is the only way you’ll be able to write. If you have a block on some days, that’s fine, pick up the next day, and if you don’t know what to write, it means you haven’t read enough.


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been considering doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and answers to any questions you may have.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a RKC’s master’s student – Tomislava

Through the #DILO series of blog posts, we have been bringing you insights into the life of our master’s students, sharing their thoughts and opinions, ups and downs, and key learning points during their online studies. The whole idea behind this series is to make you aware of the realities of online studies and aid you in decision making.   

This week we take a look  at a day in the life of one of our master’s degree student, Tomislava. Here are a few insights and some words of wisdom that Tomislava has to share from her own experience:  

There is no better way to learn than from those who came before and see if what worked for them. It will help you become a better student and, hopefully, help you make an informed decision.

Tomislava is a mother of 3 kids and works as an assistant in emergency team at WHO

An Introduction

Who are you?

My name is Tomislava B and I am a mother of 3 kids, 8, 15 and 17. I work at WHO and as a assistant in emergency team who today are fighting the Covid-19 by supplying to the countries in need several essential items like Oxygen, masks, etc. and sending off different vaccines, medicine to be used in solidarity trials in testing and, so much more.

Which programme did you choose and why?

University of Cumbria’s MBA International Healthcare Management programme. I have been offered a job in WHO and I thought it would be good to learn on the subject.

The Study Plan

Photo by Jessica Lewis on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I worked in the evenings. I would block minimum 3 hours, reading a lot and getting all information by searching on the subject that I was studying. I did not have any experience, so it was all very new to me . I read every message and comments by students. That helped me a lot. Also asking a lot of questions.😀.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

I used to study in the evenings during the week and part of the day in the weekend. But mainly evenings for there were no distractions at that time of the day..

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

Once I would start a topic, I worked on it from the first day without leaving it in the middle. The time was precious, and working and studying at the same time was a great challenge. I also used my lunch time at work for looking what was taught and took few notes. I would do brainstorming by marking on the paper anything that will be useful for my writing.

Travelling and Communication

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

If travelling, I used to take all with me. All my books were online and when I was not travelling, I used my electronics notes. For anything that would come in my thoughts, I would pen it down.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

Evening time worked the best for me. We also formed a WhatsApp group and we could discuss any questions there. Also it was nice to hear different experiences and feedback.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online master’s student look like for you?

Getting up for the day, with books all over the place.😀. But, not a mess, as I arranged piles of books by unit and by subject in a very organised manner. I made a pile with different notes by period as to were I was in the writing. It was like building up something slowly but surely the final work was visible. Or like a song strophes by strophes 🎶 .

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Yes! One has to be very organised and never put anything down for tomorrow. Imagine you are making a wall and you have given yourself a goal to do let’s say half a meter. And you are ready but some other staff comes with more interesting things to do like to go out for a drink with a friend. And you say ok I will do it tomorrow. Tomorrow comes and what is going on? You have not started! You have to do everything that you were going to do yesterday and all that has been added today. You will find it very hard and will not be able to manage the way you would have done, if you had done a little part from yesterday and the part for today. It will demotivate you and tomorrow you will doubt etc.

So stay on track and do little by little but every day . Read everything and comments given by professor and by classmates is something not to be ignored! You will see that any question you have, you will find an answer in the precious discussions.


We at Robert Kennedy College are here to support you through the entire process and encourage you to get in touch with our team of Education Advisors and chat with them Live on WhatsApp if you have any questions about our programmes, fee structure, the application process, or details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

If you have already made up your mind and are ready to apply, then just click here.

#Dilo – A day in the life of an RKC student – Wilson K

As a former Education advisor, if I had to pick one of the most frequently asked questions by prospective students, it would be “How many hours do I need to study?”  

The vast majority (if not all) of our students are working and leading hectic professional lives. Some are motivated and have already decided to undertake a master’s, while others contemplate the unknowns of an online programme. In my experience, two things affect their decision the most.   

First – finances, and second, being able to strike the perfect work, study, and life balance. While I cannot completely help you with the finances (partially yes – check out the discount offers currently being offered on our online MBA, MSc, and LL.M programmes), I thought what I could do to help was to bring some facts to light about the other unknowns – what does a typical day in the life of an online master’s student look like?  

I asked a few of our students from different walks of life, occupations, and personal situations to answer a few questions on their study tactics and strategies, plans and reality, and so on.  So, through our ‘#DILO ‘a typical day in the life of a master’s student’ blog series every month, we bring to you one of our actual students or alumni sharing the insights.   

Today, we’re looking at Wilson’s typical study days. Wilson, the Managing Director of an advertising company in Kenya for the past 14 years, offered us these answers:

An Introduction  

Vidhi Kapoor (VK): Which programme did you choose and why?  

Wilson K (WK): I chose an MBA programme in International Business in order to boost my wealth of knowledge for conducting business through a wider lens that could help me steer the company and any new initiatives to greater heights from an informed foundation.

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Stayed focused and consistent

The Study Plan   

VK : How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?  

WK:  While the modules are structured with the ease of flexibility, the fundamental aspect is that each revolves around the individual’s ability to keep the pace as a member of a group class. And this means serious balancing between work expectations and deadlines, not to mention that you must also research and study to reflect the mind of a master’s student. My strategy was to allocate the first 2 hours on Monday, 2 hours Wednesday morning and at least 3 hours on Friday to catch up with the reading and contribute to class work and assignments as well. 

VK: What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

WK: I found morning hours very apt especially if the assigned time implied adjusting your wake-up schedule and morning routine. The mind is less polluted and cluttered with the day’s requirement and one is able not only to concentrate but also bring out the best in terms of thinking and concentration.

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Wilson allocated time based upon the requirements of each assignment

VK: How much time did you devote for each assignment?  

WK: Time devotion for each assignment was dictated by the requirements and details of the questions. In most cases, each weekly assignment needed about 4 hours, but the examinations required at least 4 days considering that one is given the benefit of knowing each paper in advance.

Travelling and Communication  

VK: Did you travel for work? How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

DA:  My work involves a lot of travel around the country but whenever such need arose, I had to plan for a trade-off in terms of hours where either delegation or relegation of priorities had to be effected. Missed classwork and deadlines sounded like the best recipe for failing a module and facing the menacing consequences that are well defined within the rules.

VK: How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

WK: With proper planning and calculated awareness of time differences, I really can’t say I had a problem interacting with peers. The University timetable was also well aligned to this as both the classwork and assignment deadlines did not create overly demanding adjustments.

A typical day as a master’s student  

VK: What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

WK: A typical day comes with lots of anxiety on not only how well you are faring in class but your preparedness towards the assessments. You also have to keep check of your performance within the organisation especially if you are a leader so that you do not jeopardize the organization you guide.

Any advice?  

VK:Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

WK: This programme demands individual discipline especially on time management. The risk of just skimming through the course is real and the most important thing to keep at the back of the head is that this should not just be for passing the exams and getting an award but to ensure that you obtain the incredible insights that propels your line of thought, intelligence, and faculties higher than where you are today.

   

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Wilson says the programme aims forthe incredible insights that propels your line of thought, intelligence, and faculties higher than where you are today.

Alright friends, this was a sneak peek of a typical day in Wilson’s life as a master’s student. I hope you find it insightful and informative and that it gives you an idea of what to expect when you enrol for our master’s programmes. Watch this space as we have many more interesting insights coming up!