#Dilo – A day in the life of an RKC student – Wilson K

As a former Education advisor, if I had to pick one of the most frequently asked questions by prospective students, it would be “How many hours do I need to study?”  

The vast majority (if not all) of our students are working and leading hectic professional lives. Some are motivated and have already decided to undertake a master’s, while others contemplate the unknowns of an online programme. In my experience, two things affect their decision the most.   

First – finances, and second, being able to strike the perfect work, study, and life balance. While I cannot completely help you with the finances (partially yes – check out the discount offers currently being offered on our online MBA, MSc, and LL.M programmes), I thought what I could do to help was to bring some facts to light about the other unknowns – what does a typical day in the life of an online master’s student look like?  

I asked a few of our students from different walks of life, occupations, and personal situations to answer a few questions on their study tactics and strategies, plans and reality, and so on.  So, through our ‘#DILO ‘a typical day in the life of a master’s student’ blog series every month, we bring to you one of our actual students or alumni sharing the insights.   

Today, we’re looking at Wilson’s typical study days. Wilson, the Managing Director of an advertising company in Kenya for the past 14 years, offered us these answers:

An Introduction  

Vidhi Kapoor (VK): Which programme did you choose and why?  

Wilson K (WK): I chose an MBA programme in International Business in order to boost my wealth of knowledge for conducting business through a wider lens that could help me steer the company and any new initiatives to greater heights from an informed foundation.

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Stayed focused and consistent

The Study Plan   

VK : How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?  

WK:  While the modules are structured with the ease of flexibility, the fundamental aspect is that each revolves around the individual’s ability to keep the pace as a member of a group class. And this means serious balancing between work expectations and deadlines, not to mention that you must also research and study to reflect the mind of a master’s student. My strategy was to allocate the first 2 hours on Monday, 2 hours Wednesday morning and at least 3 hours on Friday to catch up with the reading and contribute to class work and assignments as well. 

VK: What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

WK: I found morning hours very apt especially if the assigned time implied adjusting your wake-up schedule and morning routine. The mind is less polluted and cluttered with the day’s requirement and one is able not only to concentrate but also bring out the best in terms of thinking and concentration.

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Wilson allocated time based upon the requirements of each assignment

VK: How much time did you devote for each assignment?  

WK: Time devotion for each assignment was dictated by the requirements and details of the questions. In most cases, each weekly assignment needed about 4 hours, but the examinations required at least 4 days considering that one is given the benefit of knowing each paper in advance.

Travelling and Communication  

VK: Did you travel for work? How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

DA:  My work involves a lot of travel around the country but whenever such need arose, I had to plan for a trade-off in terms of hours where either delegation or relegation of priorities had to be effected. Missed classwork and deadlines sounded like the best recipe for failing a module and facing the menacing consequences that are well defined within the rules.

VK: How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

WK: With proper planning and calculated awareness of time differences, I really can’t say I had a problem interacting with peers. The University timetable was also well aligned to this as both the classwork and assignment deadlines did not create overly demanding adjustments.

A typical day as a master’s student  

VK: What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

WK: A typical day comes with lots of anxiety on not only how well you are faring in class but your preparedness towards the assessments. You also have to keep check of your performance within the organisation especially if you are a leader so that you do not jeopardize the organization you guide.

Any advice?  

VK:Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

WK: This programme demands individual discipline especially on time management. The risk of just skimming through the course is real and the most important thing to keep at the back of the head is that this should not just be for passing the exams and getting an award but to ensure that you obtain the incredible insights that propels your line of thought, intelligence, and faculties higher than where you are today.

   

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Wilson says the programme aims forthe incredible insights that propels your line of thought, intelligence, and faculties higher than where you are today.

Alright friends, this was a sneak peek of a typical day in Wilson’s life as a master’s student. I hope you find it insightful and informative and that it gives you an idea of what to expect when you enrol for our master’s programmes. Watch this space as we have many more interesting insights coming up! 

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Anicet

We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

There is no better way but to learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student!

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am Anicet.

Which Uni are you studying with?

University of Cumbria

Which programme did you choose and why?

Energy & Sustainability. Chose this to acquire skills and knowledge in environment impact assessments and protection.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I took one module at a time. Depending on the volume of reading and assignments, spent on average 2 hours a day

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

Early morning and lunch break

How much time did you devote to each assignment?  

Research, book/articles selection and reading, writing and reviewing took a lot of time. I would say on average 40 hours per week.

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Travelling and Communication  

How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

Except the time seating on the plane, no major impact as long as I was connected to the Internet

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

It was not a big deal since I spent most of the time in Kinshasa, DR Congo.

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

Wake-up at 5:00 AM. Meditation, Gym and toilets till 6:40 AM. Breakfast at 7AM. Arrive at office at 8:30 AM. Stay at work till 6:00PM. Arrive at home at 6:25 PM. Diner at 8:00 PM and bed at 10:00PM

Photo credit: Canva.com

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

Prepare and start reading materials/books ahead of time. Do not wait until last minute to work on your assignment. Avoid overloading oneself with many modules at a time.


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and answers to any questions you may have.

4 ways in which International Business Law affects trade

In the global economy that we live in today, everything and everyone is connected and inter-dependent. The demand for companies to grow multi-nationally has grown exponentially since the pandemic started last year. Internet boom in the late ’90s and 2000s had been instrumental in the dramatic rise in international business. Now, it seems to have exploded manifold.  

The scale and scope of business operations are not limited to one country. While the raw material is procured in one country, it is manufactured or assembled in a different country and marketed and sold in yet another. Businesses have crossed boundaries set by a country’s borders. They operate and thrive on foreign land. It is however not the same as operating in the homeland. Before setting foot on the foreign land and expanding, a business must familiarise itself with the land’s laws, legal system, social and economic conditions, political system, and culture. All these factors have a significant impact on the running of the business and its bottom-line.  

Laws affect every business, whether it is being operated as a ‘brick and mortar store or selling goods/services online. Different countries have different legal systems established to protect the country’s economy and trade and preserve their social, economic, cultural, political environment.

National governments have an important relationship with global businesses. Governments tend to control and manage their trade relationships with an array of policies like taxation laws, tariffs, subsidies, currency controls, import-export policies, free-trade zones, and so on. For instance, China is a Communists government, and the government formulates and strictly controls all business sector laws.

On the other hand, India has a democratic government, and business laws are made to protect small businesses and consumers.

There are three types of legal systems: 1. Civil law, 2. Common law and 3. Religious law. Countries like the United States, India, and Australia use common law systems; Germany, France, and Russia use civil law systems and countries like Pakistan, Middle Eastern countries, Saudi Arabia and Iran operate on Islamic laws. Therefore, it is imperative for any business to fully understand the legal system that it is going to operate in and abide by its rules and regulations for conducting a business.  

Here are four ways in which international business law affects trade and things every business must research well before venturing into the country or region to avoid any failures:  

1.   Taxes  

Taxes take a major cut out of a company’s profits. When it comes to taxes, companies should do their homework well. From how much taxes are levied on the goods and services, manufacturing or selling, to how the taxes should be charged, i.e., either include taxes in the sale price or charge extra tax, the businesses must follow the standards set by the law. Companies like to operate in countries that offer attractive tax regimes with low tax rates on income, capital gains, and dividend income. Singapore, for these reasons, has been one of the most popular locations for companies to set up offices in the country and enjoy its lowest corporate tax rates.  

2.   Intellectual property  

Legalities around intellectual property can be complicated and expensive. Trademarks, copyright, and patents are intellectual properties that every business needs to guard and protect. Countries take extra measures to attract international business by establishing stringent IP protection laws and reducing piracy. Governments across the world have established several acts and international conventions to protect international businesses and resolve issues if any arise. The Paris Convention for the protection of Industrial property, the United Nations Convention on contracts for International Sale of Goods, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the Madrid Protocol, the Singapore Treaty, the Nice Agreement, the Patent Law Treaty and the Hague agreement are a few of the many international treaties formed to protect international business and trade.  

3.   Supply Chain and Infrastructure  

Establishing an effective and efficient infrastructure is the backbone of any successful business. Cheap sources of raw material can help companies to have huge profit margins. International business laws exist that regulate international shipping, export and import duties.  

4.   Labour Laws  

While cheap labour attracts foreign investment into a country, labour laws exist to protect human resources from any exploitation. The textile and footwear industry are among the many industries that have shifted their manufacturing operations to Asian countries that offer cheap labour. The Rana Plaza collapse, an incident in a Bangladeshi factory, happened in 2013 but is still fresh in the memory of many who lost their near and dear ones in this event. The plaza collapsed, killing thousands of its workers due to large structural cracks and poor labour protection laws. The incident stirred up an international movement and led to the establishment of International Labour Law (ILO). The ILO is the source of international labour law that is embodied in its Conventions, recommendations and the documents that emanate from the supervisory mechanism responsible for applying those international labour standards.  

These are a few of the things that any organization should take into account before venturing out into international business. If these legalities are correctly taken care of, legal counsels suggest that companies can maximise their bottom lines and enjoy huge revenues and profits. If International business law interests you or you would like to understand it better, join our one-year Online Master of Laws programme specialising in International Business Law.