Students for students: Patricia and Mike’s advice on reading for academic writing

Hello everyone,

I’m sure you’ve missed me 😉 Life has a funny habit of getting in the way at times, so I have been very silently on the blog lately. Now however, I am back, with a new piece of advice from one of your fellow students, Patricia, whom I’ve met in Zurich last summer. Time flies – it will be almost one year ago soon!

Anyway, neither myself nor the MALICs present at the dinner managed to convince Patricia to stand in for a short video, but she promised she’d send us something once she’s home, and she did! Patricia works as a Senior Digital Inclusion Specialist, and here’s what she had to say about her experiencing in MALIC, with a particular emphasis on reading for the modules:

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"This was taken the weekend of her wedding last year, so a very happy time for us as we had a quiet mother/daughter meal together." ~ Patricia

“This was taken the weekend of her wedding last year, so a very happy time for us as we had a quiet mother/daughter meal together.” ~ Patricia, Sep’2011 cohort, Qatar

I will add to this what I also told Patricia on listening to her recording for the first time: in reality, it is difficult to give a generic piece of advice in what concerns reading. We are all different, and different types of learners read differently – one may be very comfortable skim-reading, while another will find that unless they read everything cover to cover they can’t make sense of it.

Just as I was preparing this post this morning a further discussion on this topic was taking place in the Induction module, where Mike, another MALIC “veteran”, had the following to say:

My experience is that in the beginning you try to read the books from cover to cover but I found that I quickly became overwhelmed and depressed at my lack of progress, so you need to learn to read differently.

I learned to take a topic in a book and read that and then look for similar topics in other books to get a range of opinions on that topic. Some you can read properly if it sounds valuable and some you scan looking for things of interest. Try also to read all the Introductions in each book to give them context.

Doing this means you can get through up to 25 books or articles in a module without have to read all of them completely. Only read what is relevant and what fits into the section you are researching using the Power Point slides in each unit as a guide. You will find things of interest not covered in the slides which is also good.

I always tried to thoroughly read the essential books and not so thoroughly the recommended books, but do look out for the recommended books marked with a # as they are usually very good.

Mike, Sep’2011 cohort, Papua New Guinea

 

Students for students – Kaiss’ advice on using journals

Hello everyone,

I thought I’d fire just one last post before the end of the world 😉 So here’s Kaiss’ advice on reading – just like many of you, Kaiss is a busy person and it seems he found a good way of reducing slightly the amount of reading one must do to catch up with the field.

We too, of course, often tell students to read journal articles, both because they summarise the theory before making their own point, but also because they are more recent than some of the books out there – but who listens to the prof?

I give you Kaiss:

Students for students: Sean’s tip about academic thinking

Hello everyone,

After a somewhat longish break, here I am again with some more videos from the Zurich residency last autumn (so far already, considering the 20cm of snow on my balcony!). Today’s student is Sean, who works for Vodafone as solutions architect and holds, as he says it, a Bachelor of Experience. Here’s his tip about wrapping your head around all these academic theories!

Enjoy, and drop a word off for Sean to say thanks – he had the impossible task of staying focused in a room of 30 MALICs having fun 🙂

Students for students: Greg’s advice on assignment writing

You have probably noticed a bit of silence since my return from York – breaking the routine of daily life has an effect on tutors as well, just as it does on students: had to focus on delivering feedback on midterm drafts for the September cohort, so the blog took the back seat.

Back now, and continuing our series on student tips and tricks, here comes Greg, with a bit of advice on writing assignments. Greg was also in Zürich and had a part in making everyone have a jolly good time.

The floor to Greg:

Live from York: Graduation for RKC’s own MALICs – photos inside!

I have been telling you for about a week now about the excitement this week was to be filled with. Well, guess what, today was graduation day, and we got to see, cheer and hug our very first MALICs to graduate from York St John in the York Minster.

Yours truly had a good seat for taking some unofficial photos, and as promised (and demanded – hi Biliana!), here they are! You might recognise Francis, Adriaan, Reda, Helgi and of course Sarah, George, and Alistair. Susan received the Postgraduate Prize in Leading Innovation and Change, so congratulations are in order!

 

Live from York: MALIC residency well under way

Hi everyone,

So excited yesterday about meeting a whole group of MALICs that I even forgot to take any photos. I mended this today: here are the MALICs in one of the group-discussion sessions. To be continued with reports from tomorrow’s graduation!

There are many photo cameras in the room – feel free to share your own photos on our Google+ page!

Deanna’s MALIC story

Currently on my way to the airport, heading for yet another week of excitement in York, in the company of more than 50 MALICs: 40 attending their residency, and about 20 attending their own graduation! Will try to have some photos from the event as well.

Seen how so far I am the most prolific RKC blogger, I’m leaving you with a bit of a testimony from Deanna, a soft-spoken jamaican with a big heart.

Sorry for the rather noisy audio, but a room full of MALICs having fun tends to get noisy! Thanks Deanna for sharing your experience with the rest of us and hope to hear from you and the good things that happen in Jamaica!

Students for students: Marcela’s advice on life-study balance and assessing the workload

In Zürich we also met Marcela, management consultant and happy person extraordinaire – and certainly one of the students keeping the group on its toes throughout the week. Here’s what she had to share with herself if she could go back in time to when she first started:

If you think she’s about to burst into laughter, you’re not far from the truth – she is officially the record holder for the number of takes and the one who sparkled the idea of a bloopers video as well … *hint*hint*