Venturing into the world of Cryptocurrency – 5 reasons why businesses should move towards digital currency

One day I was sulking over the pitiful return I got from my money in a bank’s saving account (The rate of interest offered by my bank is a little shy of 0.01% for a balance over $5000 and 0% on balances less than $5000). My colleague shared a similar disappointing story of seeing his money stay the same over a period, giving no returns. He was a risk-taker and invested in crypto about a decade ago. I stayed put as I knew little about crypto and thought it was all a scam! Fast forward ten years, he now owns a healthy bank balance or, should I say, digital currency balance and a brand new mode of payment!

Cryptocurrency has come a long way in the last decade. Cryptocurrency ownership increased 63% just in 2020, and the valuation exceeded $2 trillion for the first time in April 2021. Bitcoin has been one of the oldest and most iconic cryptocurrencies in the blockchain domain. Closely following its footsteps is the Ethereum blockchain – the second largest digital coin. And both combined hold the most significant shares of crypto valuation.

This trend is here to stay and become a financial revolution in the currency world.

Photo credit: Canva.com

There is an increasing interest in buying and using cryptocurrency, especially among millennials, as this is the future of payments. Consumers don’t want to miss out on this lucrative investment opportunity or miss being part of the futuristic trend of being able to pay with digital currency for retail purchases. The market has a strong interest, and the findings suggest that current owners, former and even non-owners, are eager to own and use cryptocurrencies for making purchases in the future. As per the Cryptocurrency Payments Report May 2021, “12% of consumers (a projected 30 million) currently own one or more cryptocurrencies, 4.5% (11.5 million) have owned them in the past, and 17 million non-owners may acquire cryptocurrency to make purchases in the near future.”

Currently, crypto owners have spent their digital currency on making purchases of jewellery, grocery, online gaming/gambling, food delivery and even real estate. They would like to pay for retail products, travel, financial services, furniture and appliances and streaming services with cryptocurrency.

All they await is more merchants to open doors to cryptocurrency and start accepting the new mode of payment! So, merchants pay attention!

Here are 5 reasons why businesses should join this revolution and should consider accepting cryptocurrency:

1. Opening doors for new customers

Businesses can give their brand an instant facelift by accepting virtual currencies. It provides a cutting-edge image to the company, attracting new customers keen on spending cryptocurrency.

2. Lower fraud risk

Unlike credit cards, cryptocurrency is safe from chargebacks or fraud. The transactions processed with cryptocurrency usually cannot be reversed or cancelled, which means lesser chances of fraud.

3. Lower transaction fee

Businesses can potentially save a lot on the processing fees they usually pay on transactions using the traditional methods. With cryptocurrency, the processing cost will reduce even more if using the same blockchain crypto. Hence, businesses will eventually get a bigger slice of the profits.

4. Lesser trading risk

Cryptocurrencies are meant to pose smaller risks. The market fluctuations do not affect the value of your business when you are dealing in cryptocurrency.

5. Boundaryless payments

In this international market, especially in post-covid conditions, businesses can go global by accepting digital payments from anyone anywhere. Anyone having an internet connection can make a purchase without worrying about the exchange rates for currency conversions.


Cryptocurrencies have been gaining momentum and have caught the eye of one too many. This is one of the ways to stay ahead of the competition by taking on the forward-thinking opportunity.

Robert Kennedy College has recently become one of the merchants where one can pay with cryptocurrency. RKC offers a secure method to pay your course fees using Coinbase. Payment is accepted using Bitcoin, Ethereum, USD Coin and Litecoin.

Talk to one of our advisors on WhatsApp to know more about paying course fees using Coinbase.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Paul

Here’s presenting another gem of our #dilo -a day in the life of RKC student series. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. 

There is no better way but to learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student! Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision..

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am a Supply Chain Officer(Procurement) and my brief involves acquisition of goods, works, services , consulting and non consulting services for a project funded by the World Bank in the energy sector.

Which programme did you choose and why?

MSc in Procurement,Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Having been in supply chain management for well over 20 years, I felt that by acquiring advanced qualifications would enhance my unique capabilities in supply chain management. My overall goal is to offer consulting services independently as a consultant or contractor.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

By allocating at least three hours daily for each unit in the morning and after finishing my day’s work. I spent weekends studying and sometimes reading up to midnight to catch up with the tutorial offered by UoS (University of Salford) and RKC (Robert Kennedy College). Strictly adhering to my study schedule, it really worked for me.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

Early mornings an hour and two hours in the evening. Saturday I spent the whole day studying and on Sundays half a day.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?  

I devoted at least a week fo revision, drafting and finalizing the assignment.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Travelling and Communication  

How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

Much of it positively. However, there was one instance that I was negatively impacted when in an overseas travel. I experienced network problems and unlucky fell unwell for a whole week in the final submission time.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

Ensuring that I respond to all posts and participate actively when I have time. Every time after work I had to go through all posts and submitted my posts too to any forum discussions.

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

Extremely busy for me but very flexible given my tight work schedule.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

One has got to have interest in the studies.This is quite self motivating and gives one the impetus to keep studying despite challenges that come from busy work schedule.

I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and answers to any questions you may have.

Risk Management – 5 steps to better manage risks

If this year, 2020, has taught us anything, it is that risk is a part of life for humankind. The sooner we come to terms with it, identify the cause, plan and strategise to arrive at effective counter-measures, the greater our chance to survive and prosper!

What is risk?

Organisations have a number of internal and external factors that make it uncertain to meet their vision, missions, values, goals and objectives. These uncertain conditions that persist are collectively termed “risks”. 

In general, our tendency is to try avoiding risks as a lot of these instances can lead to negative outcomes, but there can also be positive ramifications of risk. The positive results are an outcome of companies being able to capitalise on the opportunities presented by the risk.

Identifying negative risks and avoiding them, while at the same time being able to take advantage of the opportunities presented by positive risks can be a daunting task for a manager, as a wrong call might result in great loses or a missed opportunity for greater growth.

Risk is a future uncertain event and being able to predict the event and putting in place solutions or strategies to either avoid or take advantage of the event is what risk management is all about. But every organisation’s appetite for risk is different and that is usually directly dependent on the tolerance an organisation might have towards risk.

So, what are risk appetite and risk tolerance?

We have all heard the saying “no risk, no reward”. Taking big risks could lead to big losses, or conversely, could lead to greater rewards. 

The risks which are identified as opportunities should be low hanging fruits to deal with and to reap their benefits. 

Risk appetite is the willingness of an organisation to take risks, while risk tolerance refers to how much risk an organisation can bear

Risk Management

According to Douglas Hubbard (The Failure of Risk Management: Why It’s Broken and How to Fix It) – Risk management is the identification, evaluation, and prioritization of risks followed by coordinated and economical application of resources to minimize, monitor, and control the probability or impact of unfortunate events or to maximize the realization of opportunities.

Risk management can and should be implemented across any industry or vertical, such as project management, operations, finance, military, medical, etc. Like any other department in an organisation, the risk management team should ensure that it is able to justify its costs by first creating value for the organisation by becoming an integral part of the strategy and decision-making process of the organisation. The team should be responsive to changes (both internal and external), systematic and process oriented about their analysis, transparent about their processes, and capable of adapting and growing. 

Effective implementation of risk management will provide an organisation with

  • Early warning to potential risk due to uncertain events
  • Better decision making through a good understanding of risks and their likely impact
  • Effective allocation of resources
  • Reassuring stakeholders

Risk management can be broken down in five basic steps

  1. Plan –  A risk management plan specifies the management’s intent, systems, and procedures required to manage risks, roles and responsibilities, and tools to be used in identifying risks. The plan will specify how the following four steps are to be executed by the organisation. 
  2. Identify – Identify the potential risks, their causes and their potential consequences. This is usually done by a team of subject matter experts  using methods such as brainstorming and tools like SWOT analysis, flow diagrams, Ishikawa diagrams, etc.
  3. Analyse – Once you have identified the potential risks, analyse them using either qualitative (a subjective analysis that is quick and easy to implement using tools like matrices probability and impact matrices) or quantitative (a detailed and time intensive analysis of risk using tools such as expected monetary value analysis, Monte Carlo analysis, decision tree, etc.) methods to classify them as high, medium, and low priority risks. Organisations may not have the resources to plan for all the risks and might be able to accept some risks without action, some with only periodic monitoring, and finally, some with a detailed action plan to take advantage of or to all together avoid the risk event. 
  4. Plan a response – Depending on the priority of the risk, a strategic response needs to be planned, and resources allocated with the goal of reducing the impact of negative risks, and capitalising on the impact of positive risks. Some of the strategies are avoid/transfer/accept/exploit.
  5. Monitor and control – Nothing in this world is static, change is the only constant. Risk monitoring and control should be an ongoing and continuous process. A change in external or internal conditions might result in a low priority risk evolving into a high priority risk or a high priority risk devolving into a low priority one. By monitoring them you will not be caught unprepared!  

This is why, not only is risk management an important module in a number of our online master’s degree programmes, but we also offer, through an exclusive partnership with the University of Salford, UK, a 100% online M.Sc. programme in MSc Fraud and Risk Management.

If you are interested, or have any questions, you can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programmes we offer, the application process, and for information on discounts we might be offering at this time.